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Biographical IRcview 



THIS VOLUME CONTAINS BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF 



LEADING CITIZENS OF 



CUMBERLAND COUNTY 



MAINE 



"Biography is the home aspect of history" 



BOSTON 

Biographical Review Publishing Company 

1896 






of 



PREFACE. 



IN all this wide earth there is nothing else so interesting and important as human 
life; and the history of individual lives is recognized as, at its best, one of the 

most attractive and valuable forms of literature. It behooves every generation 
to write its own records, to leave behind its own memorials. The present volume ol 
local biographies, carefully prepared from materials furnished by the patrons of the 
work, is issued by the publishers in the confident hope that it will prove satisfactory 
as the fulfilment of promise and a work of permanent value. These pages treat of 
earnest toilers of to-day and of yesterday, workers with hand and brain, who have 
been largely instrumental in the industrial, social, and political development of 
Cumberland County — men and women who, taking life in "earnest," have made 
"footprints on the sands of time." The conquests here recited art of mind over 
matter and circumstance. 

To preserve the memory oi local worthies, as well as of national celebrities, is 
to foster home ties, local attachments, and patriotism, and to encourage good citizen- 
ship. Furthermore, to borrow the words of an eminent speaker, "Whatever fame 
great achievements may bestow, whatever honors the world may erive, it i- ever the 
most cherished hope of every seeker after fame and fortune to be kindly remembered 
and lovingly honored on the spot which gave him birth." 




NEAL DOW. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




V EN£RAL NKAL DOW, who 

is "greatest in great things," 
was born in Portland, Me., 
March 20, 1804. He is yet 
interested, active, and influ- 
ential in his chosen field 
of philanthropic, reformatory 
labor. To be able to say 
that in the closing months of 
1 895 of one who was born 
when the century was but three years old; who 
was engaged in affairs before John Ouincy 
Adams attained the Presidency; who in early 
manhood achieved success in business; who 
served his city and State in civil positions 
with distinction; who, after the age when 
men are exempt from such demands, gave 
three years to the military service of his 
country, commanding successive,])' a regiment, 
a brigade, and a division, suffering mean- 
while sickness in hospital and wounds in 
battle and subsequently confinement in mili- 
tary prisons; whose form has been familiar for 
mme than the lifetime of a generation on plat- 
forms in over a score of States in this country; 
who has been a welcome speaker in the largest 
cities of the English-speaking world; who has 
reached the people through the press of three 
continents during all this time ; and who even 
now looks forward to work to be done rather 
than back upon that accomplished — is to prove 
that Ncal Dow, of whom it is said, has won a 
place on the roll of the world's great and 
grand old men. 

The subject of this sketch is of English 
stock. His ancestry on both sides came to 
this country from England in the first half of 
the seventeenth century. His race has been 
a long-lived one, his family records showing 



many who lived beyond the allotted age of man. 
He is a lineal descendant of John Dow, who 
resided in Tylner, Norfolk County, England, 

dying there in 1561, whose grandson, Henry, 
was the first of the family to come to America, 
settling in Hampton Falls, N.H., in 1637. 
On the maternal side Neal Dow is descended 
from Christopher Hall, who was the earliest 
settler of the family in this country. His 
parents, Josiah and Dorcas (Allen) Dow, were 
members of the Society of Friends, as indeed 
were his ancestors on both sides for three 
generations. His mother died in 1851 at 
seventy-seven years of age, and his father in 
1 861 at ninety-five. 

Possessing by inheritance British pluck and 
Quaker patience and persistency, physical and 
mental vigor, Neal Dow was providentially 
prepared to be a leader in a great reform. His 
boyhood presaged the man. He was educated 
in the town schools and in the Portland Acad- 
emy and at the Friends' Academy in New Bed- 
ford, Mass. In the latter school among others 
he had for a classmate the late Moses H. Grin 
nell, of New York ; while in the Portland Acad- 
emy among his school-fellows was Henry 
Wadsworth Longfellow. He was fitted for 
college; but, because of the prejudices which 
then generally prevailed among the Friends 
against it, his parents would not permit him to 
pursue a collegiate course of study. His love 
for reading was never abated, and books have 
been his closest companions through his life. 
He was far from a recluse, however, and in his 
youth entered with ardor into all the athletic 
sports of the period. Twice it has been his 
good fortune to turn his skill and strength as 
a swimmer to account in the saving of life. 

Neal Dow's attention was early given to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



business. His father, who had been a teacher, 
established a tannery, building up a successful 
business, to which Neal succeeded. His in- 
tuitive judgment and flash-light perception 
unusually qualified him for affairs; and a 
comfortable competency, which he soon ac- 
quired, enabled him early to withdraw much 
of his attention from business pursuits to de- 
vote his time, at first largely and later almost 
wholly, to the cause that he early espoused. 
During his active business career his assistance 
and advice were sought in many enterprises 
which served to develop his city and State; 
and he was found in the directorate of banks, 
railroads, manufacturing and other business 
corporations. 

As was the case with most of the active 
young men of his time, he was connected with 
the volunteer fire company, rapidly rising to 
be its chief. Under his charge the Portland 
Fire Department became famous for discipline 
and efficiency. It is undoubtedly true that the 
confidence and respect which he won in that 
capacity attached to him a corps of earnest, 
active young men who materially aided him in 
the contests in which he was afterward in- 
volved. His first temperance speech resulted 
from his connection with this department. He 
was twenty-three years of age and clerk of the 
Deluge Engine Company, which voted to fur- 
nish liquors on an anniversary occasion. Upon 
the declaration of the vote young Dow- took 
the floor, and following his speech the com- 
pany reversed the vote and established a prece- 
dent which it always followed during its 
existence, and which soon became the rule 
throughout the Portland Fire Department. 
Thus in 1827 the majestic moral victor was 
born. 

From that time on his efforts at reform have 
been unremitting. In 1829, in an address 
before the Maine Charitable Mechanics' Asso- 
ciation, he called attention to the subject; and 
in the same year he introduced in its meetings 
a proposition to abolish the custom then pre- 
vailing among employers of furnishing liquor 
to their workmen, and the ringing of the 
eleven and four o'clock town bell, with which 
up to that time for many years it had been cus- 
tomary to notify laborers that the usual hour 
for dram drinking had come. With such a 



beginning, encountering as he did almost 
single-handed and with marked success the 
social customs and prejudices of the day, it 
was inevitable that his field of labor should 
broaden ; and after 1830 he sought every oppor- 
tunity with pen and speech to awaken the 
public conscience and to impress upon his 
fellow-citizens a sense of their personal respon- 
sibility. 

He and his friend, the now venerable Hon. 
William W. Thomas, of this city, with a lew 
of their associates, took the first steps in organ- 
izing the Young Men's Total Abstinence So- 
ciety of Portland. He was also active at that 
early day in procuring the enforcement of the 
penal provisions of the then existing license 
legislation against the violators of those laws. 
It was at that time that the necessity of legis- 
lative suppression of the traffic forced itself 
upon his mind. Progress was slow. The road 
over which it was made was steep and rugged, 
involving the severing of social ties, the break- 
ing of political connections, the sacrifice of 
time and money, of comfort and of pleasure. 
All this Neal Dow accepted without faltering. 
One of the first results of the agitation was 
the enactment of a law, practically the local 
option system prevalent in some States to-day, 
which permitted selectmen of towns and alder- 
men of cities to submit to the people the ques- 
tion whether Licenses should be granted. In 
1839, under its provisions, Mr. Dow appeared 
before the aldermen to oppose the granting 
of licenses. As a result the question was 
submitted to the people. The vote favored 
license by a considerable majority, but a year 
or two later the public expression was reversed 
by a large majority. 

In pursuing the work Mr. Dow, with others, 
took long tours into different parts of the 
State. Meetings for arousing public interest 
were held in school-houses, in town halls, 
where these existed, and in churches, and 
where, as was sometimes the case, none of 
these could be obtained, in private houses, 
or, when the weather would permit, out of 
doors. This was before the days of railroads; 
and Mr. Dow travelled with his own team, 
often accompanied by one or two or three others. 
Some of these tours involved two hundred 
miles of travel in open sleighs with the ther- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



mometer at times below zero. This method of 
agitation continued for a term of years ex- 
tending from about i 835 to 1850. Meanwhile 
Mr. Dow had appeared at nearly every session 
of the legislature, advocating the enactment of 
a law prohibiting the liquor traffic, but with in- 
different success. At first the result was a 
vote authorizing the petitioners to withdraw; 
then the measure would be passed in one house 
to be rejected in the other; the next year, per- 
haps, the latter branch would pass the bill and 
the former reject it; later still both houses 
approved the measure, leaving to the Governor 
the responsibility of vetoing it. 

In 1851 Neal Dow, who had been in poli- 
tics a Whig, was nominated by that party as 
its candidate for Mayor of Portland. This 
nomination was brought about rather by the 
rank and file than by the party leaders, to 
many of whom the selection of Mr. Dow as 
a candidate was far from agreeable. A con- 
siderable number of what were at the time 
called "Liberal Whigs," under the guidance 
of some of the leaders of the party, bolted the 
nomination; but Mr. Dow was elected by a 
larger vote than had ever been given to a Whig 
candidate before. 

A few weeks after his election Mr. Dow 
again appeared before the legislature and advo- 
cated the prohibition of the liquor traffic. He- 
had formerly appeared before that body simply 
as a private citizen : now he took with him 
whatever of weight and influence his official 
station could add to his character and ability 
as an individual. The legislature was Demo- 
cratic in both branches, and some of the war 
horses of that party did not take kindly to a 
measure urged upon them by a representative 
Whig. An amusing but earnest speech made 
by a leading Democrat begged Democrats not 
to follow "this popinjay Whig, Lord Mayor 
of Portland." But the bill passed both 
branches of the legislature just as it was 
written by Mr. Dow. This was on May 31, 
185 1. On June 2 it was signed by Governor 
Hubbard, also a Democrat. It is safe to say 
that no measure of only local effect ever at- 
tracted wiiler attention than did that enact- 
ment, which earned world-wide celebrity as 
the "Maine Law." Similarly the fame of its 
author commenced its extension in constantly 



widening circles throughout the English- 
speaking world. 

Upon Mayor Dow fell the task of enforcing 
this new and startling measure in the largest 
city in the State. It demonstrated its effi- 
ciency under an earnest and impartial enforce- 
ment ; and the marked results of the law for 
good throughout the State not only firmly 
established the policy of prohibition in the 
convictions of the people of Maine, but 
aroused agitation in behalf of similar legisla- 
tion in several of the States in this country 
and also in Great Britain. Mr. Dow's ser- 
vices upon the platform and through the press 
were widely sought; and, being relieved by a 
defeat at the polls in the spring of 1852 from 
the cares of the Mayoralty, he was able to re- 
spond to many of those invitations, and 
travelled extensively in the northern part of 
the Union, addressing by request the legis- 
latures of several States. In 1855 he was again 
elected Mayor of Portland as the first candi- 
date for that position of the Republican part}-, 
which was then just organized in Maine. He 
was unanimously elected as a Representative 
to the State legislature in 1858, and re- 
elected in 1859. In 1S57 he visited England 
and Scotland by invitation of the United King- 
dom Alliance, and addressed audiences in all 
the larger cities. 

In the latter part of 1861, after the first flush 
of war enthusiasm had expended itself and 
enlistments were dull, Governor Washburn, 
of Maine, requested Mr. Dow to raise a regi- 
ment of volunteers; and about the same time 
the Secretary of War commissioned him to re- 
cruit a battery of artillery. He was made 
Colonel of the Thirteenth Maine Regiment, 
and was ordered to the Gulf Department under 
General Butler. On the way thither the 
steamer "Mississippi, " in which was Colonel 
Dow with a portion of his regiment ami a 
Massachusetts regiment also under his com- 
mand, was wrecked off Frying Pan Shoals. 
The occasion afforded an opportunity for the 
display of his wisdom and fortitude in trying 
circumstances. He was shortly after commis- 
sioned Brigadier-general by President Lincoln, 
and was in command at Fort St. Philip and 
also at Pensacola, Fla., and subsequently of 
the defences of New Orleans to the north 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of the city. He participated with his brigade 
in the first assault upon Port Hudson, where he 
•was wounded, and, while convalescing at a 
farm-house within the Federal lines, was capt- 
ured by a party of Confederate cavalry. He 
was confined at Libby Prison, at Mobile, and 
again at Libby Prison, for some nine months, 
when he was exchanged for General Fitz 
Hugh Lee. Finding his health and strength 
impaired by the exposure of army life and the 
hardships of his imprisonment, he then re- 
signed his commission, and upon the conclu- 
sion of peace returned with unflagging zeal to 
his labors for the promotion of temperance, in 
which he has ever since been engaged. 

From the inception of the troubles incident 
to the election of President Lincoln, Mr. Dow 
was active with speech and pen in support of 
a policy which should at once preserve the 
Union and abolish slavery. At the suggestion 
of his friends in Great Britain, with a view to 
counteracting the machinations of the enemies 
of the Union there, he wrote many articles for 
publication in English journals; and, by tend- 
ing to show that the war was precipitated upon 
the country in an effort to perpetuate and ex- 
tend slavery, he was enabled to render good 
service to the cause of freedom. While he 
was connected with the army he devoted all 
his leisure to this work, with such result upon 
the public sentiment of Great Britain that he- 
was formally thanked therefor by the Union 
Emancipation League of Great Britain and the 
United States Minister at the Court of St. 
James. 

On January 20, 1830, Mr. Dow married 
Maria Cornelia Durant Maynard, of Boston, 
a woman of culture and refinement. Mrs. 
Dow died on January 13, 1873. Of the ten 
children born of this marriage, but four are 
living — Mrs. Louisa Dwight Benton, of Lan- 
caster, N. H. ; Emma Maynard Gould, of Bos- 
ton, Mass. ; Frederick Neal Dow, recently 
Collector of the Port of Portland ; and Cor- 
nelia Maynard Dow, of Portland, who presides 
over her father's home. 

On March 20, 1894, Mr. Dow attained the 
age of ninety years. Anniversary celebrations 
were held all over this country, and two hun- 
dred in Great Britain, many in Australia, and 
several in other parts of the world, among 



them one in Jerusalem. Congratulatory mes- 
sages, letters and floral offerings, and formal 
addresses poured in upon him from all sides. 
The Old World and the New, and many foreign 
tongues, as well as his native language, contrib- 
uted to the memorable occasion. The State 
Board of Trade, then in session in Portland, 
passed appropriate resolutions upon the occa- 
sion, congratulating General Dow upon his 
great services to the State, and appointed a 
committee to wait upon him and convey the 
good wishes and respect of its members. '1 lie 
city government of Portland did the same. 

The immense audience which filled the City 
Hall of Portland in the evening exchanged mes- 
sages by cable with a great gathering in Free 
Trade Hall, Manchester, England. Among 
the distinguished speakers at the Portland cel- 
ebration were Governor H. B. Cleaves and ex- 
Governor Selden Connor. A portrait of Gen- 
eral Dow was presented, to be placed in the 
rotunda of the State capitol ; and the Hon. 
James P. Baxter, Mayor of Portland, who pre- 
sided, said : — 

"No son of Portland has thrown about it 
such a halo of wholesome light as the man 
whose ninetieth birthday we celebrate to-night. 
He sits here as an example for the old and 
young, and may the memory of this night 
long live with our people." 




ATHANIEL DEERING, merchant, 
came to Portland, then Falmouth, in 
1 761, from Kittery, where he was 
born January 29, 1736. He was of 
the fifth generation in descent from George 
Deering, who was one of the early emigrants 
to this country, coming from Devonshire, 
England, about 1635, anc l settling at Black 
Point, now part of Scarboro, Me., not far from 
Richmond Island. 

His son, Roger Deering, died in Kittery in 
1676, leaving a son, Clement Deering, who 
married Joan Bray, a daughter of John Bray, 
of Kittery. Joan Bray's sister Margery mar- 
ried William Pepperell, and became the 
mother of Sir William Pepperell. Clement 
Deering died in 1701. His son, John Deer- 
ing, was born June 17, 1680, and married 
Temperance Fernald, a daughter of William 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



13 



Fernald, whose wife was a Miss Langdon, a 
member of the well-known New Hampshire 
family of that name, being a grand-daughter 
of the Tobias Langdon who married Eliza- 
beth Sherburne. John Deering was a sea 
captain, and commanded for many years 
vessels of his cousin, Sir William Pepperell, 
in their foreign voyages. His son, John 
Deering, was born July 16, 17 10, married 
Anne Dunn, of Boston, and was the father of 
Nathaniel Deering. The second John Deering 
also was a sea captain, and he died at sea in 
1758. 

The responsibility of providing for his 
mother with her large family thus fell upon 
Nathaniel, and in order to better his condition 
he came East and settled at Falmouth. His 
family soon followed him; and before long his 
mother married Deacon James Milk, a promi- 
nent merchant and ship builder here, with 
whom Nathaniel associated himself in busi- 
ness. In 1763 James Milk, a son of Deacon 
Milk, married Mary Deering, a sister of Na- 
thaniel, which event was followed the next 
year by the marriage of Nathaniel Deering to 
Dorcas Milk, a daughter of Deacon Milk, 
and in 1766 by the marriage of his brother, 
John Deering, to Eunice Milk, another daugh- 
ter. Willis, in his history of Portland, says 
of these marriages, "This quadruple alliance 
formed a strong family cement, and concen- 
trated the efforts and extended the influence of 
prominent and enterprising men, which en- 
abled them to accumulate property and create 
a large business." 

Nathaniel Deering's mother died in 1769 
at the age of fifty-eight; and in 1772 Deacon 
James Milk died, leaving a large estate to be 
divided among his children. Among other 
portions was the large and valuable tract of 
land lying between Exchange and Market 
Streets and extending from Middle Street to 
low water mark. Nathaniel Deering lived in 
a house which stood on the corner of Exchange 
and Fore Streets till it was destroyed in the 
bombardment of the town by the British in 
1775. After this he purchased and occupied 
the land on the corner of Exchange and 
Middle Streets, upon which the post-office 
now stands. He was actively interested in all 
town affairs, and was twice chosen Selectman, 



his associates being General Peleg Wadsworth 
and John Fox, these being the first Selectmen 
chosen after the separating of Falmouth and 
Portland in 1786. 

In 1776, the commerce of the town having 
suffered severely from the depredations of the 
British cruisers, Mr. Deering bought and fitted 
out the ship "Fox " as a privateer; and, letters 
of marque and reprisal being issued by Gov- 
ernor John Hancock to Mr. Deering, John Fox, 
and Deacon Titcomb, the "Fox" did consider- 
able damage to the property of the enemy. 
Mr. Deering subsequently sold one-half of the 
"Fox" to Messrs. Fox and Titcomb. After 
the Revolutionary War was over he was the 
first to resume business in the town, engaging 
largely in commercial enterprises, to accom- 
modate which and to promote the mercantile 
facilities of the town, he extended the pier 
which had belonged to Mr. Milk and himself, 
near the foot of Exchange Street, and at that 
time called Deering's Wharf, into the spacious 
wharf which from its extent took the name of 
Long Wharf, and was for many years the 
principal centre for the shipping of the port. 
It was begun in 1793; and here Mr. Deering, 
having taken his son James into partnership 
with him, transacted a large commercial busi- 
ness, and co-operated extensively with such 
well-known merchants as the Amorys, Grays, 
Dexters, and Derbys, in their varied enter- 
prises. 

Purchasing large and valuable tracts of land 
in different parts of the city, he laid the foun- 
dation of the Deering and Preble estates. 
Among the purchases made by him was the 
beautiful grove of oaks, containing about fifty 
acres, known for so many years as "Deering's 
Oaks," and immortalized by Longfellow in his 
poem of "My Lost Youth." This grove his 
descendants wishing to preserve gave in 1879 
to the citizens of Portland for a public park 
on the condition that it should be kept for 
that purpose forever. The family at one time 
declined an offer of fifty thousand dollars for 
it from the city of Portland. 

Mr. Deering died September 14, 1795. A 
man of energy, business capacity, and un- 
swerving integrity, he was universally re- 
spected; and his death, when in the vigor of 
life and in the midst of large enterprises, was 



14 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



a serious loss to the community. His widow, 
a woman remarkable for her strong common 
sense and excellent judgment, survived him 
until 1826. She was greatly interested in the 
First Parish of Portland, and was one of the 
founders of its charity fund. Mr. Deering 
left two children — James Deering, of whom 
an account will be found below; and Mary 
Deering, who married in 1801 Commodore 
lid ward Preble of the United States Navy, cel- 
ebrated for his bombardment of Tripoli. 



'AMES DEERING, a distinguished mer- 
chant of Portland, was born August 23, 
1766, and was the eldest of the two 
children of Nathaniel Deering. He 
received his education principally at the Dum- 
mer Academy at Byfield, Mass., then the most 
frecpiented institution for preparatory studies 
in New England, under the care of the well- 
known Master Moody. Commodore Preble 
and other young men from Portland were also 
sent there in the absence of all means of in- 
struction at home during the disastrous period 
of the war. On his return and before coming 
of age, James Deering entered into commercial 
business with his father, a connection that ter- 
minated only at the death of the latter. The 
heavy responsibility then cast upon the son 
was relieved by the practical sagacity of his 
mother, which enabled him to continue the 
improvements of the estate in various direc- 
tions, especially the erection of the brick 
blocks on the easterly side on Exchange 
Street, commencing at the foot in 1797 and 
going up the street to Middle Street. By his 
judicious management, aided by the growing 
prosperity of the town, he accumulated a large 
estate. 

He married Almira Ilsley, a daughter of 
Enoch Ilsley, Esq., a prominent and influen- 
tial citizen, in March, 1789; and they lived 
in uninterrupted happiness for more than 
sixty-one years. In 1804 Mr. Deering, having 
purchased some years previously the farm in 
Westbrook in the vicinity of Deering's Oaks, 
built the present Deering mansion, and took 
up his residence therein. At the time of his 
death his estate there consisted of over two 
hundred acres and was a model farm. He 



was a member of the Massachusetts Horticult- 
ural Society, and introduced here the best 
variety of fruit-trees that could be imported, 
and always adopted the latest and best methods 
of scientific farming. His stock was of the 
best breeds, and usually took the prizes at 
the county fairs; if they did not, he at once 
purchased those that did. His fondness for 
real estate was proverbial. He bought large 
tracts in different parts of the city and in the 
suburbs, and time has shown the wisdom of 
those investments. In the development of his 
property he showed uncommon and far-seeing 
liberality, giving street after street to the city 
of Portland without asking for any compensa- 
tion. In 1849 he gave the land for New State 
Street, a broad and beautiful thoroughfare over 
seventy feet in width, running from Congress 
Street to Deering's Oaks, and contributed in 
addition seven hundred dollars toward making 
it. He also gave to the city part of the 
Eastern Promenade, which ran through his 
property for a long distance. He was greatly 
interested in the building of the Atlantic & 
St. Lawrence Railroad, and was the largest 
subscriber to its stock in Portland, and was 
one of its first Directors. For many years he 
was a Director in the Maine Bank. 

Mr. James Deering was singularly exact, 
conscientious, prompt, and methodical in all 
his transactions, and required the like quali- 
ties from those with whom he dealt. He was 
at the same time a generous man, and freeh- 
and largely contributed to all objects which 
received his approbation; but he neither be- 
stowed his charities nor performed any other 
act of his life from ostentatious motives or 
with desire for popular favor. This he never 
courted. No man ever avoided notoriety 
more sincerely than he did; and his benefac- 
tions to meritorious persons, which were fre- 
quent and liberal, were privately conveyed, 
the recipients never knowing their source. 
In the domestic and social relations of life he 
was kind, affectionate, and courteous. In no 
house were friends or strangers received more 
freely or entertained with more generous hos- 
pitality. In the street his acquaintances were 
always greeted with a smile. Forms and cere- 
mony and all the artificial rules of society 
were to him as distasteful as they usually are 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



IS 



to guests. Many distinguished men were en- 
tertained at his cheerful mansion, and his 
manner of receiving them was most cordial 
and unceremonious. lie was of a bright and 
happy temperament; and it is to the cheerful 
views which he took of life, and his moderation, 
that we may attribute the long period he was 
permitted to enjoy its pleasures. Nor was he 
insensible in his last sickness to the numerous 
blessings which had surrounded him, or the 
source from which they came; but he laid 
them clown in perfect calmness and resigna- 
tion. 

The death of a man of so many good quali- 
ties was a severe bereavement, not only to the 
family, but to the community in which he 
lived. The poor lost a friend always ready to 
relieve, and society an example of honorable 
and successful effort, of cheerful, generous 
sympathy. An obituary notice in the Portland 
Advertiser concludes as follows: — 

" He was one whom great wealth could not 
intoxicate, and whose best sympathies, feel- 
ings, and affections it could not dry up or 
wither. In his intercourse with his fellow- 
citizens of every class he was always, in real- 
ity as well as in manner, the same genuine 
republican, one of nature's gentlemen, al- 
ways cheerful, interesting, and unaffected. 
There was nothing about him to remind the 
most humble that he was conversing with a 
rich man. It was a matter unthought of in 
his presence. As a consequence he was sin- 
cerely respected and beloved to an extent that 
but few wealthy men are." 

After his death the name of the town of 
Westbrook was changed to that of Deering in 
his honor. He died at the Deering mansion 
on September 21, 1850, aged eighty-four 
years, leaving a widow, a son, Nathaniel 
Deering, and five daughters — Harriet and 
Mary L. Deering, Mrs. Thomas Amory Du- 
blois, Mrs. Henry Merrill, and Mrs. William 
Pitt Fessenden. Harriet and Mary Deering 
lived for many years at the family mansion, 
carrying on the large farm left them by their 
father with a reverential regard for his mem- 
ory. Possessed of large wealth, they were en- 
abled to do many deeds of private and public 
charity. Never was a deaf ear turned by them 
to any worthy appeal, and their names are 



connected by generous contributions with 
nearly every great and good work in the com- 
munities of Portland and Deering. 



|Jg\ATHANIEL DEERING, author, son 
I =# of James Deering, was born in Port- 
Jjs ^ land, June 25, 1791. At the time 
of his birth his father resided on 
the corner of Middle and Exchange Streets, 
on the site of the First National Bank, the lot 
upon which the house stood having been part 
of the garden of Deacon James Milk, his great- 
grandfather. In early boyhood Nathaniel 
Deering attended the school of Mr. Patten; 
and from there he went to Phillips Exeter 
Academy, then under the charge of the well- 
known and beloved preceptor, Benjamin Ab- 
bot, for whom Mr. Deering always enter- 
tained the highest respect, and to whom he 
subsequently dedicated his first play. After 
finishing his preparatory studies at Exeter he 
entered Harvard College, and was graduated 
there in 1810, standing fourteenth in a class 
of sixty-three, and leaving with a reputation 
of being a great wit and one of the best clas- 
sical scholars in the qollege. Intending at 
first to become a merchant, he spent some 
time in the counting-room; but, as his father 
was anxious that he should adopt the law as a 
profession, and as that was more congenial to 
his tastes, he entered the law office of Judge 
Ezekiel Whitman, Congressman, and one of 
the most distinguished members of the bar in 
the district of Maine. 

Mr. Deering was one of the foremost in the 
band of talented young men of the town, in- 
cluding William Willis, Bellamy Storcr, 
Charles S. Daveis, and William P. Fessenden, 
and others, who established a club for literary 
and social purposes, and published in manu- 
script an exceedingly bright and witty paper 
called the Torpedo. Mr. Deering was the edi- 
tor of this paper and one of its most constant 
contributors. Plis services were also in de- 
mand for Fourth of July orations and various 
other public occasions, and as early as 1813, 
at the dinner given by the citizens of Portland 
to the officers of the United States brig "En- 
terprise," he sang an ode composed by himself 
for the occasion, of which the battle between 



i6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIF.W 



the "Enterprise" and the "Boxer" was the 
theme. He was admitted to the bar in 1815, 
and began the practice of his profession in the 
Kennebec valley, where he resided for some 
years in the town of Skowhegan. 

In 1824 he married Anna Margaret Hol- 
well, the daughter of Major John Z. Holwell 
of the British army, whose father, James Hol- 
well, was a Lieutenant Colonel of the famous 
Ninety-third Regiment of Foot, known as the 
"Scots Grays," and whose great-grandfather 
was John Z. Holwell, Governor of Bengal, 
who commanded the English garrison at Cal- 
cutta at the time of its capture by Surrajah 
Dowlah in June, 1756, and with one hundred 
and forty-five others was confined in the 
terrible Black Hole of Calcutta, of whom only 
twenty-three, including their commander, 
Governor Holwell, came out alive. 

Mr. Deering returned to Portland in 1836, 
and gradually relinquished the law for the 
more congenial pursuit of literature. He be- 
came for a short time the editor of a political 
paper called the Statesman, published in the 
interests of Henry Clay; and during his life 
he was a constant contributor to the daily 
papers, nearly all of his articles appearing 
anonymously. William Cullen Bryant, im- 
pressed with his ability in this field, urged his 
acceptance of a place upon the New York 
Evening Post ; but Mr. Deering, preferring to 
remain in his native town, declined the flatter- 
ing offer. In 1830 he published "Carra- 
basset," a tragedy in five acts, founded upon 
the story of the massacre of Father Rasle and 
the Norridgewock Indians by the British in 
1720, a theme suggested to him during his 
residence in the vicinity of Norridgewock. 
This was followed by the "Clairvoyants," 
a comedy. Both these plays have been several 
times produced upon the stage in Portland and 
Boston. In 1851 he published his tragedy of 
"Bozzaris," which is the most carefully 
written of all his productions, the characters 
being finely conceived and well sustained 
throughout. The critics of the day all spoke 
in the highest praise of the work. 

As a humorous writer he became quite popu- 
lar at one time; and some of his stories, as 
"The Donation Visit," "Mrs. Sikes," and 
"Tableaux Vivants," appearing originally in 



the old Portland Gazette, Portland Transcript, 
and Coleman's Magazine, were extensively 
copied by newspapers in different parts of the 
country. His brilliant wit, sparkling repar- 
tee, and striking bon-mots will long be re- 
membered in his native town and vicinity. 
His native humor was also manifested in sev- 
eral ballads, political songs, and epigrams, 
published in the periodicals of the day. But 
it is in such beautiful poems as "The Grave," 
"The Harp, "and "The Solitary," that Mr. 
Deering showed the true poetic quality of his 
mind, and indicated what he might have 
written in a more serious vein. He was ex- 
ceedingly musical in his tastes, and composed 
a number of hymns and anthems, which ap- 
peared in various collections of sacred music, 
and are still in use. 

In 1858 Mr. Deering lost his eldest son, 
Edward Deering, a young man of brilliant 
promise. For some years he had been en- 
gaged in business in Boston, and later came 
back to Portland, and entered into mercantile 
business. Generous by nature, endowed with 
those qualities of person and manner that win 
general favor, he was the idol of a large circle 
of devoted family friends, and he was equally 
at home in the ranks of business men and in 
society. 

His second son, James Deering, at the be- 
ginning of the Rebellion entered the navy, 
and was on blockade duty on the frigate 
"Santee" and other vessels for over two 
years. He was then transferred to the Mis- 
sissippi squadron, commanded by Admiral 
David D. Porter, and in 1864 received bis 
commission as Acting Ensign in the navy. 
He was executive officer of the iron-clad gun- 
boat "Ozark" during the Red River expedi- 
tion, and was repeatedly complimented in the 
reports of his superior officers for his gallant 
and meritorious conduct at that time, lie 
remained on duty till the close of the war, 
when he resigned his position in the navy to 
accept one in the Quartermaster's department 
in the army, and was stationed on various 
posts in the West. He died in 1876. Up- 
right, generous, and open-hearted, no one had 
fewer enemies or warmer friends. 

In 1878, on the death of his last surviving 
sister at the ancestral homestead in Deering, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'7 



Nathaniel Deering, with his family, moved 
out to the family mansion, and resided there 
in an exceedingly peaceful and happy old age 
till his death, which took place on March 25, 
1 88 1. He left one son, Henry Deering, and 
three daughters — Harriet H. Deering, Mar- 
garet D. Gilman, and Marion D. Noyes. 

He was a man of sterling character, uniting 
the strictest integrity with the sensitive ten- 
derness of a woman. Possessed of great 
talents, he was prevented by extreme modest)' 
and self-distrust from taking the position in 
the community that was clearly his, and which 
men of far less ability did take. No man was 
more charitably disposed or more ready to re- 
lieve the unfortunate, and no one more unpre- 
tending in his daily walk. Singularly happy 
in his home life, he was content that others 
should strive for the brilliant prizes that 
might easily have been his. We cannot find 
a more fitting word with which to close this 
notice than the following lines from his own 
poem of "The Solitary": — 

" And in his matchless features one might trace 
The march of thought, the majesty of mind. 

And his was one that learning had refin'd, 
And it was lull of high imaginings. 

No more the joys of time and sense could bind 
Him down to earth. On Fancy's fairy wings 

He loved aloft to soar and muse on heavenly things." 



f^5|"ON. WILLIAM W. CUTTER, Mayor 
of the city of Westbrook, Me., a 
leader in mercantile as well as po- 
litical circles, was born at Cape 
Elizabeth, Me., January 11, 1S51. His par- 
ents, Ephraim P. and Ardelia M. (Warren) 
Cutter, were both natives of Cumberland 
County, Maine. 

Richard Cutter, his first progenitor in this 
country, emigrated from the north of England 
and settled in Cambridge, Mass., about the 
middle of the seventeenth century; and in 
Cambridge several generations of the family 
lived and died. They were an energetic and 
long-lived race, and reared large families. 
Ammi Cutter, the great-grandfather of Mayor 
Cutter, fought in the battle of Lexington; 
and his death occurred on April 19, 1795, the 
twentieth anniversary of that fateful engage- 



ment. He was three times married, and was 
the father of twenty-one children. 

His son Simon, the father of Ephraim P. 
Cutter, was born in Cambridge, Mass., in the 
latter part of the eighteenth century. He was 
educated at Ipswich Academy, graduating 
therefrom, being especially proficient in math- 
ematics. He taught navigation and survey- 
ing for several years, both in Cambridge 
and in Westbrook, Me., whither he moved 
in 1806; but in the latter part of his life 
he was engaged in the manufacture of lum- 
ber. Injured by an accident in one of his 
mills, he died about 1842, when fifty-four 
years of age. Simon Cutter was a member of 
the Commissary Department during the Wai 
of 1S12, and later was Colonel of the State' 
militia. He married Mrs. Christiana (Dyer) 
Simonton, daughter of Captain John Dyer, of 
Steuben, Me., a Revolutionary patriot who 
raised ami commanded a company of Conti- 
nentals. Mrs. Christiana Cutter died in 
Westbrook in 1852. 

Ephraim P. Cutter was born in 1822 in 
Westbrook, opening his eyes to the light in a 
house which stood where now stands the hand- 
some structure known as Odd Eellows Block, 
in which is his son's place of business. 
Reared to manhood in Westbrook, he there 
learned the trade of a millwright, but subse- 
quently worked in a number of different 
places. In 1858 he went to California by way 
of the Isthmus of Panama, and obtained em- 
ployment in the ship yards on Mare's Island. 
In 1862 he returned home, and after a short 
stay made another visit to California, travel- 
ling overland. He died in 1876. His wife. 
Mrs. Ardelia M. Cutter, who was born in 
1822, became the mother of four sons. She 
now makes her home with her youngest son, 
William W., enjoying the peaceful sunset of 
a useful life. She is a member of the Univer- 
salist church. Her other sons, who are all 
married and living in Minnesota, are: Charles 
P., a practical painter; Oscar L., a bank 
cashier at Anoka; and Cassimer W., a retired 
merchant. Soon after the birth of William 
W. Cutter in Cape Elizabeth his parents re- 
moved to Portland; and from there they went 
to Lovell, from which town in the fall of [S54 
they came to Westbrook. He attended the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



common schools of the town and Gorham 
Academy, and taught school for a while after 
completing his studies. Possessed, however, 
of a natural taste for mercantile life, Mr. 
Cutter embraced the first opportunity to enter 
the world of trade, obtaining employment in 
the store of Mr. L. W. Edwards, a dry-goods 
merchant, who is still in business in West- 
brook; and he was subsequently employed as 
clerk for one year in the large store of East- 
man Brothers & Bancroft in Portland. Re- 
turning to Westbrook, Mr. Cutter started in 
business in a comparatively small way in 
[882, putting in a stock of dry goods, boots, 
and shoes. His enterprise prospered to such 
an extent that he was soon obliged to seek 
more commodious quarters, and he moved into 
the large store which he now occupies in Odd 
Fellows Block. This is situated in the very 
heart of the thriving city of Westbrook, and is 
the centre of an ever-increasing trade. 

Mr. Cutter is man of inherent business abil- 
ity, and has attained his present eminence 
through his own unaided efforts. As a Repub- 
lican of some local prominence, he has taken 
an active part in public affairs. He was a 
member of the School Board for two years, 
held the office of Treasurer of the town for 
several years, and in 1892, one year after 
Westbrook was granted a city charter, was 
elected to the Common Council. The follow- 
ing year he was re-elected, and chosen Presi- 
dent of that body; and in the spring of 1895 
he was elected Mayor of the city, being re- 
elected in 1896. His administration has been 
of the progressive order, and his integrity and 
tact have won for him a warm place in the 
hearts of his fellow-citizens. 

Mr. Cutter was married in Westbrook in 
1875 to Miss Addie S. Hazleton, a native of 
Westbrook, daughter of Ivory and Jane R. 
Hazleton. One child has blessed their union, 
a daughter, Elizabeth E., a young lady of 
many gifts and accomplishments, who is still 
pursuing her studies at the academy at Brad- 
ford, Mass. 

Mayor Cutter has been a member of Sac- 
carappa Lodge, No. 11, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows of Westbrook for twenty years, 
and has held all the principal offices. He is 
also a member of Temple Lodge, No. 86, 



A. F. & A. M., of Westbrook, and a charter 
member of Wawenock Tribe, No. 35, Im- 
proved Order of Red Men of Westbrook, 
in which organization he has held the most 
important positions. Through his great- 
grandfathers, Captain John Dyer and Ammi 
Cutter, he is eligible to membership in the 
Sons of the Revolution. 




ILLIAM GORE, who at his late re- 
tirement from active business life, 
was the oldest merchant of Freepoi I, 
was born in Roxbury, Mass. (now a part oi 
Boston), on November 23, 1810, son of Paul 
and Mary (Davis) Gore, both his parents being 
natives of that place. His father, who was 
born January 7, 1767, was a hatter, and 
worked at his trade during the greater part of 
his active life. He owned a small farm in 
what is now Jamaica Plain, Mass., which he 
cultivated for family needs, and was an indus- 
trious and prudent man, one of the most pros- 
perous citizens of old Roxbury. In politics a 
Whig, he took an active part in public affairs, 
and represented his district in the legislature 
for a number of years. In religious belief he 
was a Unitarian. He died at the age of 
eighty-five. Paul Gore Street, Jamaica Plain, 
to-day perpetuates his name. His wife, Mary 
Davis, was one of fifteen children, thirteen 
of whom married and established homes. She 
was called to rest in her eighty-fourth year. 
They were the parents of eight children, all ol 
whom reached maturity, but only one of whom 
is now living — William, the subject of this 
sketch. 

William Gore was educated in the common 
schools of Roxbury and at Newburyport 
(Mass.) Academy. In 1826 he went to work 
as clerk for his brother, Martin Gore, a dealer 
in hats and furs in Portland. In the fall of 
1827 he engaged with Dana & Smith, with 
whom he remained nearly four years. In [83] 
he removed to Freeport, and, forming a part 
nership with Samuel Holbrook, opened a gen- 
eral store. This connection lasted five years, 
at the end of which time Mr. Holbrook's 
son, Samuel A., purchased his father's in- 
terest ; and the firm of Holbrook & Gore con- 
ducted a successful and growing trade lor 



BIOGRAPHICAL' REVIEW 



'9 



thirty years. Mr. Gore then became sole pro- 
prietor of the establishment, which he con- 
ducted alone for fifteen years, subsequently 
taking William A. Davis as his partner, which 
connection lasted fourteen years. At the end 
of that time Mr. Gore sold his stock to E. B. 
Mallett, Jr., and retired from active business, 
having been engaged in trade for sixty-two 
years, an unusual and gratifying record. He 
looked well to the essentials of success in his 
line, keeping first-class goods, promptly meet- 
ing the demands of his customers, and dealing 
courteously with all. 

On August 5, 1835, Mr. Gore was married 
to Helen Louisa Nye, who was born in Free- 
port, October 11, 18 16, and is a daughter of 
Nathan and Susan (Lazed) Nye, her father 
being a representative of one of the oldest 
families of Freeport. Three children blessed 
the union of Mr. and Mrs. Gore, of whom but 
one is living — Clara W., wife of C. C. Luce, 
of Boston, Mass. Helen Louisa, who was 
born October 11, 1836, died August 5, 1894; 
and William P., who was born September 8, 
1844, died December 9, 1861. Mr. Gore is 
one of the most respected citizens of Freeport, 
well known on account of his long and honor- 
able mercantile career, and active and ener- 
getic to-day, though the frosts of eighty-five 
years have silvered his hair. He votes the 
Republican ticket, and is a member of the 
Unitarian church, to which his wife also be- 
longs. Among the oldest residents of this 
place, they have witnessed many changes 
during the growth of the town, and have made 
friends among the representatives of three 
generations. 




)N. FREDERICK ROBIE, Presi- 
dent of the First National Bank of 
Portland and ex-Governor of the 
State of Maine, is a native resident 
of Gorham, Cumberland County. He was 
bom on August 12, 1822, son of Toppan and 
Sarah Thaxter (Lincoln) Robie, and is a de- 
scendant of Henry Robie (or Roby), who is 
supposed to have been born at Castle Dunning- 
ton, Yorkshire, England, February 12, 1618. 
Henry Robie had at least two brothers, 
Thomas and Samuel, the former living and 



dying at Castle Dunnington. Of Samuel it 
is recorded that he left home for America, but 
his arrival was never heard of. Thomas Ro- 
bie's son William emigrated to America, and, 
settling in Boston, married Elizabeth Green 
ough ; and tradition says they reared fifteen 
children. Their descendants still live in New 
York, Illinois, and Michigan. 

The exact date of the arrival in America of 
Henry Robie, the far-off ancestor of ex-Gov 
ernor Robie, is not known. The first we hear 
of him is that he was at Dorchester, Mass., 
early in 1639. He went to Exeter, N. H., in 
that year; and his name is appended to a pe- 
tition signed by a number of the inhabitants of 
Exeter, dated May 4, 1639, addressed to Kin- 
Charles I., declaring their allegiance to him 
and their obedience to such laws as he should 
make for the government of the colon)' and to 
such wholesome regulations as they should 
make for themselves. His name also appears 
on a similar petition addressed to the Governor 
of the colony asking that the town be laid out. 
In 1653-54 Henry Robie went to Hampton, 
and was Constable there in 1662. October 18, 
1669, he was an attorney in a matter before 
the court of Boston; and on July 13, 1680, he- 
was foreman of the grand jury. In 1 6S3 he, 
with other residents of Hampton, petitioned 
the Colonial Governor to be freed from head 
money. The same year he was elected a mem- 
ber of the Council from Hampton, and the 
year following he was made a Justice of the 
Peace. He died in 1688, leaving a wife, 
Sarah, and the following children : Thomas, 
Samuel, Ichabod, Mary, John, Judith, and 
Ruth. 

John Robie, the next in line, was a soldier 
in King Philip's War, under Captain Joseph 
Syll, and was credited on the books of Haver- 
ell (Haverhill) Town, November 30, 1675, as 
having earned one pound, sixteen shillings. 
Part of the time he served in the garrison at 
Chelmsford; and, for like services the next 
year under Lieutenant Benjamin Swett, on 
June 14, 1676, he was further credited with 
eight shillings, sixpence. In 1675 or 1676 
he built himself a house at Haverhill, Mass., 
in that part of the town now known as Atkin- 
son, N.H. ; and there he met his death on June 
16, 1691, being killed by the Indians. His 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



wife had died a few days before, leaving seven 
children, the oldest not quite eleven years old. 
Warned of impending danger from the Indians, 
Mr. Robie had taken his family from his home 
to a place of safety, and was returning with 
his cart and oxen about two hours before sun- 
set, when he was shot down. His son Ichabod, 
who was with him, was taken prisoner and 
carried to Canada, where he was kept about a 
year, then ransomed, and returned home. 

Ichabod Robie, the great-great-grandfather 
of ex-Governor Robie, was born in Haverhill, 
Mass., in 1680, and worked as a tanner and 
surveyor. An entry in the Provincial Records 
of New Hampshire, dated July 3, 1697, states 
that he is entitled to two pounds and two shil- 
lings for seven clays' work on the fort erected 
for protection against the French and Indians. 
He appears to have been an enterprising man, 
and was a prominent member of the society for 
settling the "Chestnut Country" (or Chester, 
N.H.), organized in October, 1 7 1 9 ; a mem- 
ber of the committee to manage the affairs of 
the society, and chairman of the committee to 
lay out lots; one of the petitioners to the Gov- 
ernor of the colony asking that they might 
have a grant of said lands; and one of the pro- 
prietors of the town of Chester, N.H., named 
in the grant from King George, dated May 8, 
1722. He was a member of the Assembly from 
Hampton in the Provincial House of Repre- 
sentatives for the years 1735, 1736, 1 741 , and 
1742, on May 8 of the last-named year being 
appointed by the House one of the committee 
to address his majesty the King upon matters 
relating to the colony, and was also elected to 
another committee to answer the speech of the 
Colonial Governor and present it to the House 
for approval. In the proceedings of the House 
in many instances he is called Captain. On 
January 13, 1706, he married Mary Cass, who 
became the mother of the following children: 
John, born in 1 71 2; Henry, born in 1 7 14 ; 
and Samuel, born in 171 7. 

Samuel Robie settled on his father's lot, 
No. 116, March 1, 1744. He was a Lieuten- 
ant in the New Hampshire regiment of which 
Samuel Moore was Colonel; and in January, 
1775, he was chosen a deputy to nominate del- 
egates to the Congress of May 10 following. 
In 1777 he was one of the Committee of Safety 



for Chester. He married a Miss Perkins; and 
their son Edward married Sarah Smith, daugh- 
ter of John and Sarah (Toppan) Smith. Ed- 
ward and Sarah (Smith) Robie were the 
parents of the Hon. Toppan Robie, of Gorham, 
Me., who had three brothers and two sisters. 

Toppan Robie was born i-n Candia, N.IL, 
January 27, 1782. He was a man of courage 
and ability, Captain in a company of State 
militia which participated in the War of 1812; 
and when, in 18 14, it was feared that Portland 
was in clanger of invasion and General Irish's 
brigade was ordered there, Captain Robie 
marched to the front at the head of his com- 
pany. In politics first a Federalist, then a 
Whig, and later an ardent Republican, he rep- 
resented his town six years in the General 
Court of Massachusetts. In 1820-21 he was 
a Representative in the legislature of Maine, 
and in 1S37 was a member of Governor Kent's 
Executive Council. He held many offices of 
public trust, and was liberal in his benefac- 
tions for the furtherance of the common weal, 
giving freely to religious and educational in- 
stitutions. The soldiers' monument at Gorham 
village was his gift, and on his eightieth birth- 
day he gave five thousand dollars to the Con- 
gregational church and parish of Chester. lie 
died, universally regretted, January 14, 1S71. 
The Hon. Toppan Robie was three times 
married. In 1S04 he was united to Miss 
Lydia Brown, daughter of Benjamin Brown, of 
Chester, N.H., and a sister of the late Rev. 
Francis Brown, President of Dartmouth Col- 
lege from 181 5 to 1S20. Mrs. Lydia B. 
Robie died in February, 1S11; and Mr. Robie 
was married in September, iSii, to Miss 
Sarah Thaxter Lincoln, daughter of Captain 
John Lincoln, who came originally from Iling- 
ham, Mass., but was a resident of Gorham at 
the time of his daughter's marriage. He was 
a worthy representative of the distinguished 
Lincoln family of Massachusetts. The second 
Mrs. Robie died in 182S, leaving three sons — 
Charles; George; and Frederick, the special 
subject of the present sketch. 

Frederick Robie, after attending the public 
schools of his native town, fitted for college at 
Gorham Academy, studying first under the 
tuition of the Rev. Reuben Nason, who died 
many years ago, and later under the Rev. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Amos Brown, D.D. He entered Bowdoin in 
1837, and was graduated in 1841 at the age of 
nineteen. That same year he aeted acceptably 
as principal of academies in Georgia and Flor- 
ida. Having decided to become a physician, 
he shortly entered the Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege at Philadelphia; and, receiving the degree 
of M. D. in 1844, in April of that year he 
opened an office in Biddeford. He was there 
actively engaged in the duties of his profes- 
sion until May, 1855, when he removed to 
Waldoboro, Me., where for three years he en- 
joyed a large and lucrative practice. At the 
end oi that period he decided to settle perma- 
nently in his native town, but destiny had 
other views for him. 

In 1 861 he was a member of the Executive 
Council of Governor Israel Washburn ; and at 
the breaking out of the war he was appointed 
by President Lincoln additional paymaster of 
United States Volunteers, his commission, 
which was one of the first of this special grade 
of appointments, being dated June 1, 1S61. 
Resigning his position in the Governor's 
Council, he entered at once on active duty and 
paid off a number of regiments in the Army 
of the Potomac in 1S61-62, as well as several 
new Maine regiments mustered into the 
United States service in August, 1862. In 
1S63 he was stationed at Boston as chief pay- 
master of the Department of New England ; 
and in the early part of 1S64 he was trans- 
ferred to the Department of the Gulf at New 
Orleans, where for more than a year he judi- 
ciously handled the government's money. 
The spring of 1865 brought the termination 
of the war and also an order to Paymaster 
Robie to return to Maine to superintend the 
final payment of the citizen soldiers from that 
State at their muster out of the service. His 
invaluable services in this important branch 
■of the army system earned for him the brevet 
of Lieutenant Colonel, an honor that few 
paymasters received at that period. His last 
commission is dated November 24, 1865. 

July 20, 1866, he was honorably mustered 
out of service; and among other encomiums of 
the public press the following appeared: "He 
has been a gentleman]}' and courteous officer, 
and has faithfully discharged the duties of his 
office" (from the Argus). "Colonel Robie's 



service has been honorable to himself and 
eminently satisfactory both to the government 
and its claimants with whom he has had to 
deal" (from the Press). "Major Frederick 
Robie, the popular and efficient paymaster of 
the United States, who has been so long sta- 
tioned in this State, has been promoted to 
Lieutenant Colonel by brevet. This is the 
first instance of a Maine paymaster securing 
such honor ; and it could have been bestowed 
on no more faithful, modest, and unassuming 
officer. He is held by the paymaster-general 
as one of the best officers in the pay depart- 
ment of our country" (the Portland Star). 

That the press voiced popular sentiment was 
indicated by the fact that in September of that 
year Colonel Robie was elected to the Senate 
of Maine, and re-elected in 1867. He was 
appointed by the Hon. William Pitt Fessen- 
den in 1S66 special agent of the Treasury De- 
partment, and served two years; and from 
1868 to 1873 he was an active member of the 
Republican State Committee. Eight times he 
has been called on to represent his native- 
town in the Lower House of the State legislat- 
ure, officiating acceptably as Speaker in 1872 
and again in 1876. Three times he has been 
a member of the Executive Council, in that of 
Governor Washburn in 1861, of Governor 
Davis in 1880, and of Governor Plaisted in 
18S1-82. He was formerly a member of the 
Whig party, but has been in full sympathy 
with the. Republican party since its organiza- 
tion. In 1873 he revisited Florida and re- 
ceived hospitable entertainment from those 
who thirty years before had been his pupils. 
The fact that many had served in the Confed- 
erate army had not impaired the strong friend- 
ships formed in early manhood. 

In the educational and industrial interests 
of Maine Mr. Robie has always taken a warm 
interest. The establishment of the State Nor- 
mal School at Gorham is largely due to his 
influence while representing his native town 
in the State legislature. In 1878 he was one 
of the commission to the Paris Exposition of 
the world's industry and art; and during that 
year he travelled extensively in Europe, by 
keen observation and philosophic thought 
maturing his views and increasing his qualifi- 
cations for the high office which he was after- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ward called to fill. The society called the 
rations of Husbandry attracted his favorable 
notice some years ago, as he saw in the organ- 
ization an instrument fitted to infuse fresh 
vigor into the agricultural interests of Maine 
and tn prevent the depopulation of the rural 
districts. Giving the weight of his personal 
influence to the society, he has largely aug- 
mented its efficiency for good. In 1882 he 
was chosen Worthy Master of the State 
Grange, being re-elected its chief officer for 
eight years; and under his administration the 
order grew in numbers and social power to 
a phenomenal extent, becoming one of the 
must beneficent of the industrial and social 
organizations of Maine. 

The idea that Colonel Robie would make 
an admirable Governor of the State occurred 
simultaneously about fourteen years ago to 
many minds in different parts of Maine, and 
at once became active; and, though late in 
the field as a candidate, he was received with 
marked favor. His familiarity with public 
affairs, his integrity and sound sense, with his 
many other marked qualifications, made him a 
favorite. Hundreds of old soldiers remem- 
bered him as the courteous and obliging pay- 
master; scores of men were familiar with him 
as a member of nearly a dozen legislatures; 
hundreds of farmers regarded him as the head 
of their order; business men everywhere 
acknowledged his possession of attributes 
which make a wise and prudent governor. 
Thirteen hundred and thirty-one delegates 
were present at the convention which nomi- 
nated him (the largest convention of the kind 
ever held in the State), and gave him ninety- 
eight votes more than were cast for his dis- 
tinguished competitor, William W. Thomas, Jr. 

The ensuing political campaign was one of 
the most exciting ever known in Maine, one of 
the leading issues being the difference be- 
tween Governor Plaisted and the Executive 
Council, of which the Republican candidate 
was Chairman. Colonel Robie's canvass was 
cordially commended by the Republican press 
within and without the State, his public 
career of twenty years being so irreproachable 
that no flaw in his record could be found; and 
the fact that he was personally known to 
voters in three-fourths of the towns in the 



State strengthened the ticket, which contained 
the names of four candidates for Congress. 
An independent movement was organized to 
defeat the Republican ticket, but fell to the 
ground. James G. Blaine privately stated 
that in his opinion "the nomination of Colonel 
Robie was the strongest that could have been 
made, and that to it was largely attributable 
the subsequent splendid victory at the polls." 
Mr. Robie received a majority of nearly nine 
thousand votes over his competitor, Governor 
Plaisted; and his inauguration took place' in 
January, 1883. His inaugural address to the 
legislature was a strong and sensible document, 
evincing a just State pride and an intelli- 
gent familiarity with the affairs and demands 
of the Commonwealth. Governor Robie was 
re-elected in 1884 by a largely increased ma- 
jority, reaching nearly twenty thousand. He 
was in office from January, 1883, to 1887, his 
record showing him to have been one of the 
most popular and efficient chief magistrates 
the State has ever had. 

In many business enterprises he has been 
and is a most potent factor. He has been 
many years a Director of the Portland & Roch- 
ester Railroad Company, whose early life his 
father was active in fostering. Mr. Robie 
was likewise for a long period a Director ol 
the First National Bank of Portland, of which 
he is now President; and in 1885 he was 
President of the Eastern Telegraph Company. 
He is a Director and member of the Financial 
Committee of the Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, and at one time was Business Manager 
of the Portland Press Publishing Company. 
He is a member of the Portland Commandery 
of A. F. & A. M., an active member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, and an intei 
ested member of the Loyal Legion of the 
United States. Pie has recently been honored 
by his town by the changing of the corporate 
name of their high school to "Frederick Robie 
High School." A very large grange of 
Patrons of Husbandry at Otisfield, Me., also 
bears his full name. 

Frederick Robie was married November 2~, 
1847, to Olivia M. Priest, an accomplished 
lady of Biddeford, Me., and the following- 
children have blessed their union: Harriet, 
wife of Clark II. Barker; Mary Frederica, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 3 



wife of George F. McQuillan, Esq. ; Eliza, 
who died September 3, 1863; and William 
l'itt Fessenden Robie. 




DWARD NEWMAN, who passed from 
earth to the fuller life beyond on De- 
cember 11, 1892, at his residence on 
Spring Street, Deering, was actively engaged 
in business in Portland for nearly half a cen- 
tury, lie was born May 16, 1816, in the 
town of Westbrook, son of Ebenezer and Mary 
(Dyer) Newman, his father being a native of 
Westbrook. Ebenezer Newman followed the 
occupation of a wharf builder during his work- 
ing clays, though for some years prior to his 
decease he was forced into retirement from 
active labor, being severely afflicted with 
rheumatism. His wife was the daughter of 
Clement Dyer, a sea captain, who made long 
voyages to foreign ports, and who was an 
active participant in the War of 181 2. They 
reared seven children, namely: George; Eben ; 
John; Thomas; Edward, the special subject 
of this sketch ; Sarah, wife of George Hopkins, 
of Cape Elizabeth, Me. ; and Mary, wife of 
John Bedell, of Portland. 

Edward Newman was bred and educated in 
his native town, where he afterward learned 
the tinsmith's trade of Elijah North. Mr. 
Newman subsequently worked as a journeyman 
in Portland, first for Mr. Glover and later for 
the firm of Warren & Milliken, finally engag- 
ing in business for himself in 1843 on Fore 
Street. He was an expert workman, and 
carried on a large and successful business, 
giving constant employment to quite a number 
of men, and doing all the heavy sheet-iron 
work that was clone in the city at that time. 
When the Portland, Saco & Portsmouth Rail- 
road was constructed, he made all the spark 
catchers for the locomotives, and also covered 
the engines, he being the only man in Port- 
land who had the requisite facilities for doing 
that kind of work. He likewise did a great 
amount of work for the Grand Trunk Railway, 
continuing in business until his health became 
seriously impaired, when he sold out to his 
son-in-law, Mr. William H. Scott, who is still 
carrying on a most prosperous business, lo- 
cated on Union Street. Mr. Newman then 



engaged in the real estate business, buying 
land and building a large number of houses 
both in Portland and Deering. In September, 
1892, he was compelled by ill health to rest 
from his labors, which he never again resinned, 
his death occurring about three months later, as 
before mentioned. He was a man of sterling 
integrity and worth, but of a quiet and retiring 
disposition, not taking any prominent part in 
public affairs. Deeply interested in the relig 
ious and moral advancement of the community 
in which he lived, Mr. Newman was one of 
the founders of the Congregational Church of 
Woodford's, and when the present edifice was 
erected he was a member of the building com- 
mittee, having charge of the work. Both he 
and his wife were active members of the 
church for many years, Mrs. Newman being 
still connected with it. 

In 1843 Mr. Newman was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Mary A., daughter of William 
Patterson, of Portland, where she was edu- 
cated, attending the school on Spring Street, 
afterward remaining with her parents until, as 
a bride, she removed to the pleasant residence 
which has since been her home. Seven chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Newman, but 
only three are now living, namely: Mary D. , 
wife of William H. Scott, of Deering; Ed- 
ward Augustus, General Manager of the Port- 
land Street Railway Company; and Abbie 
Louise, wife of Augustus K. Small, of 
Scarboro. 



JOSEPH L. ROBINSON, President of 
the Robinson Mills Manufacturing 
Company at South Windham, Me., was 
born on February 1, 1S67, in the town 
of Oxford, Oxford County. He is of English 
stock on the paternal side, both his father, the 
late Thomas L. Robinson, and his grand- 
father, Joseph, having been natives of Leeds, 
England. 

Joseph Robinson learned the trade of a 
dyer and finisher when a young man, and 
followed that occupation in England and 
Austria until 1846, when he came to Amer- 
ica. He had married on March 26, 1833, 
Frances A., daughter of Thomas Lewis, 
of Leeds; and in 1847 he was joined by 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his family at Ballardvale, Mass., where he 
worked for a year as an assistant in the 
dyeing and finishing room of a woollen- 
mill. The next year he continued at his 
trade in the factory of John Townsend at Mil- 
ton Mills, afterward working as a dyer and 
finisher at Rochester, N.H., with the Norway 
Plains Manufacturing Company. In 1857, in 
company with Mr. John Hall, of Rochester, 
N.H., he located in Oxford, Me., buying an 
old mill which they fitted up and started as a 
woollen-mill. He subsequently bought out 
his partner, and afterward sold one-half inter- 
est in the mill to H. J. & F. O. Libby, the 
business being incorporated as the Robinson 
Manufacturing Company, with Joseph Robin- 
son as President, Treasurer, and General Man- 
ager, a position for which he was well adapted, 
and which he filled creditably until his death, 
March 6, 1895. He was, in very truth, the 
architect of his own fortune, securing afflu- 
ence and influence by honesty, ability, and 
upright manliness. Coming to this country 
with a very small amount of money, when he 
first found work he had but two English 
pennies to his name; and these very same 
pieces of coin, which he always kept, are 
now treasured by one of his grandsons. 

Fifteen children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Robinson, the following six of whom 
are now living: Mary S., Frances A., Louisa, 
John B., Selina E., and Albert E. Mary S. 
Robinson, born Februarys 1835, is the wife 
of George J. Parrott, and has five children, 
namely: Joseph R., Vice-President and Gen- 
eral Manager of the Jacksonville, Tampa & 
Key West Railway and of the Indian River 
Steamboat System; James E. ; Elmer L. ; Eva 
L. ; and Albert E. Frances A., born in Oc- 
tober, 1838, is the wife of Lieutenant George 
E. Andrews, and has one child, P"rances J. 
Louisa, born May 17, rS4S, married, Edwin 
Richmond. John B., born August 16, 1852, 
married Cora E. Millett, of Norway, and has 
one child, Joseph. Selina E., born in Roch- 
ester, N.H., December 5, 1855, is the 
widow of Thomas Carr, and has one daughter, 
Selina. Albert Ii. Robinson was born in Ox- 
ford, Me., May 20, 1858. 

Thomas L., son of Joseph and Frances A. 
Robinson, was born on August iS, 1840, and 



was about seven years old when he came to 
this country with his mother in the sailing- 
vessel "Orazebee," the rough and tedious 
voyage occupying eight weeks. He attended 
the district schools of Rochester, N.H., in his 
boyhood, later completing his education at 
Comer's Business College in Boston, Mass. 
At the age of seventeen, when his father 
moved to Oxford, Me., Thomas took the place 
he had vacated in the Rochester mill, working 
as a dyer and finisher for about a year. Going 
then to Oxford, he worked for his father until 
1863, when he secured a position under S. S. 
Fisher as superintendent of the Raritan 
woollen-mills in New Jersey. He remained 
there until 1866, when he became superin- 
tendent of his father's mill at Oxford. Being 
at length obliged, on account of ill health, to 
seek another occupation, he opened a country 
grocery store in Oxford, which he conducted 
until 1879. Then, leasing the old Malison 
Falls mill for three years, he started it as a 
woollen-mill, and in 18S0, before the lease 
had expired, purchased the property. 

In 1 88 1 he erected a mill with a capacity 
of five sets, managing this successfully until 
the mill was burned in 1888. Two years 
prior to this event he had bought the plant of 
the Great Falls Woollen Manufacturing Com- 
pany, the mill having a capacity of ten sets; 
and at the time of the purchase in 1886 he 
owned a larger amount of machinery for man- 
ufacturing woollens than any one man in all 
New England. He at once rebuilt the burned 
mill in South Windham, increasing its capac- 
ity to double its former size. He did not put 
it in operation, however, owing to the depres- 
sion of business at that time, but continued 
the management of the Great Falls mill until 
his death, June 26, 1890. While in Raritan, 
N.J., he married December 3, 1865, Louisa 
Weeks, a daughter of Albert and Jane (Bur- 
nett) Weeks, of Dutchess County, New Vork. 
Of the three children born of their union, 
but two are now living — Joseph L. and 
Charles A. 

In 1 89 1, after the death of the father, the 
mills at Great Falls were sold, ami the sons 
started work in the new mills at South Wind- 
ham, giving employment to one hundred and 
ten hands, and manufacturing fine woollen 




THOMAS B. REED. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



-7 



goods, broadcloths and kerseys, shipping the 
products to New York and the Western 
markets. The present company was incorpo- 
rated in 1892 with Joseph L. Robinson as 
President, and Charles as Treasurer and Gen- 
eral Manager. Both are prominent business 
men of the town, active and influential in re- 
ligious, political, and social circles, affiliat- 
ing with the Republican party on State and 
national issues. Charles A. Robinson, born 
September 28, 1868, married Edith M. Nute, 
of Great balls, N.H., their nuptials being 
solemnized June 30, 1892. They have one 
child, Alberta, born May 3, 1893. 

Joseph L. Robinson acquired his element- 
ary education in the schools of Oxford and 
Windham, afterward attending Phillips Acad- 
emy at Andover, Mass. Since leaving school 
he has been connected with the mill. Mr. 
Robinson, socially, is a member of Oriental 
Lodge, No. 17, Knights of Pythias, of South 
Windham; while his brother Charles is con- 
spicuously identified with the Masonic frater- 
nity, having taken the thirty-second degree. 
On March 9, 1888, Mr. Joseph L. Robinson 
was united in marriage with Miss Mary E. 
Doughty, a daughter of Albert and Elizabeth 
(Simpson) Doughty, of Gray, Me. Their 
pleasant home has been brightened by the 
birth of three children, namely: Vera L., 
born August 1, 1889; Thomas L., -born Au- 
gust 11, 1 891 ; and Albert L., born November 
15, 1893. 




"ON. THOMAS BRACKETT REED, 

Speaker of the House in the Fifty- 
fourth Congress, in political life 
to-day the most prominent citizen 
of Maine, has long been recognized as one 
of the ablest leaders of the Republican party. 
He was born in Portland on October 18, 
1839, son of Captain Thomas B. and Matilda 
Prince (Mitchell) Reed. His father was a 
native of Peak's Island, and was of old Co- 
lonial stock, his mother, from whom, it is said, 
he inherits his ready wit, being a native of 
North Yarmouth. One of his remote ances- 
tors was George Cleeve, the pioneer white 
settler of the Neck — as Portland was formerly 
called — two of whose grand-daughters married 



brothers, named respectively, Anthony and 
Thomas Brackett, a Braekett great-grand- 
daughter eventually marrying into the Reed 
family. 

In 1S56 Thomas B. Reed entered Bowdoin 
College, where he was more fond of the library 
than of the curriculum, and did not especially 
shine in the class-room until near the end of 
his course. At his graduation in i860 he won 
the first prize in English composition. lie 
was an assistant teacher in the Portland High 
School for a year, and then applied himself to 
the study of law. On April 19, 1864, he was 
appointed Acting Assistant Paymaster in the 
United States Navy, being assigned to duty on 
the "tin-clad " "Sybil," at that time engaged 
in patrolling on the Cumberland, Tennessee, 
and Mississippi Rivers. 

After the war Mr. Reed was admitted to 
the Cumberland County bar, and began prac- 
tising law in Portland. In 1867 he was 
elected a member of the State legislature, and 
began his long and conspicuous political 
career. During his first term he secured the 
passage of a bill giving a superior court to 
Cumberland County. In 1869 he was re- 
elected to the lower house, and in 1870 he 
was chosen State Senator. In the same year 
he was called to the office of Attorney-general, 
and assumed his duties at the age of thirty, 
being the youngest man to serve in that ca- 
pacity since the organization of the State. lie 
became City Solicitor of Portland in 1874, and 
remained in office four years, his experience 
and ability being of great advantage to the 
city, which had at that time large interests at 
stake. In 1876 he was elected to Congress; 
and he has remained a member of that body 
up to this date, 1896, being now, as men- 
tioned above, Speaker of the Fifty-fourth Con- 
gress. For several years before his election 
as Speaker of the Fifty-first Congress he had 
been the acknowledged leader of the Republi- 
cans in the House. 

The greatest service Mr. Reed did to the 
country during his first term as Speaker was 
the death blow which he gave to the assumed 
right of the minority to obstruct legislation. 
His complete triumph ami the adoption of his 
rulings by his Democratic successors are still 
fresh in the mind of the public. 



28 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



The chief characteristics of Congressman 
Reed are admirably shown in his conversation 
with Robert F. Porter, who asked him how 
he felt when he was being held up as the 
"czar," a man whose iron heels were crushing 
out American popular government. 

"Oh," he promptly replied, "you mean 
what were my feelings while the uproar about 
the rules of the Fifty-first Congress were going 
on, and while the question was in doubt? 
Well, I had no feeling except that of entire 
serenity; and the reason was simple — that I 
knew just what I was going to do if the House 
did not sustain me, and when a man has de- 
cided upon a plan of action for either contin- 
gency there is no need for him to be disturbed, 
you know. " 

"And what, may I ask you, did you deter- 
mine to do if the House decided adversely?" 

"I should simply have left the chair, resign- 
ing the Speakership, and left the House, re- 
signing my seat in Congress. There were 
things that could be clone, you know, outside 
of political life; and for my own part I had 
made up my mind that, if political life con- 
sisted in sitting helplessly in the Speaker's 
chair and seeing the majority powerless to pass 
legislation, I was ready to step down and out. 
Did it ever occur to you that it is a very sooth- 
ing thing to know exactly what you are going 
to do if things do not go your way? You 
have, then, made yourself equal to the worst, 
and have only to wait and find out what was 
ordained. " 

"You never had a doubt in your own mind 
that the position was in perfect accordance 
with justice and common sense?" 

"Never for a moment. Men, you see, 
being creatures of use and wont, are naturally 
bound up in old traditions. While every 
court which had considered the question had 
decided one way, we had been used to the 
other. Fortunately for the country, there was 
no wavering in our ranks. " 

Robert F. Porter says: "Mr. Reed is a born 
debater, aggressive and cautious, able to strike 
the right nail on the right head, and at critical 
moments to condense a whole argument with 
epigrammatic brevity. His epigrams are 
worthy the literary artist, in that they are 
perfect in form : though struck out on the spur 



of the moment, you cannot take a word from 
them nor recast them." 

At one time, after a sharp reply to a mem- 
ber who attacked him, Mr. Reed quietly con- 
cluded in this way: "Since I have embalmed 
this fly in the liquid amber of my remarks, 
I will proceed with the main question." 

A writer in McClure s Magazine says: 
"Reed has shown better than any parliamen- 
tarian living how the turbulent battlings of 
legislative bodies, so chaotic in appearance, 
are not chaos at all to one who has the ca- 
pacity to think with clearness and precision 
upon his feet. Such a man assimilates the 
substance of every speech and judges its rela- 
tive bearing upon the question. At the be- 
ginning it is hard to tell where a discussion 
will hinge; but gradually, as the debate goes 
on, the two or three points which are the key 
of the situation, become clear to the true 
debater." 

Mr. Reed will neither vote for a man whom 
he distrusts nor a measure which he detests, no 
matter how much his constituents clamor for 
it. He is not one who can be "all things to 
all men." Socially, he is serene and good- 
natured, and his conversation sparkling and 
exhilarating. He belongs to the Cumberland 
Club, whose one hundred members are of the 
different political parties. Most of them have 
been boys together at school and call each 
other by their Christian names. There reigns 
supreme a fine spirit of equality, an unpreten- 
tious, give-and-take sort of intercourse, which 
is the ideal object of a club. Mr. Reed says 
such a club is only possible in a conservative 
city like Portland. 

Mr. Reed has never allowed his engrossing 
duties as a public man to interfere with his 
literary pursuits. He is well versed in Eng- 
lish and foreign literatures, and he has con- 
tributed political articles to some of the lead- 
ing magazines of the day. He takes cheerful 
views of human life and society, and is not 
one of those who look backward for a golden 
age. His words give no uncertain sound: 
"Whoever doubts progress doubts God. The 
rich have grown richer, but so have the poor 
— richer in rights and privileges, richer in 
comforts and happiness." 

Mr. Reed married in 1870 a daughter of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



(9 



Rev. S. H. Merrill, who served in the war as 
Chaplain of the First Maine Cavalry. The 
Portland residence of Mr. Reed and his 
charming wife and daughter is a substantial 
three-story brick house, commanding a fine 
view of Casco Bay and picturesque shores. 




<V. HARRISON SPOFFORD 
WHITMAN, President of Westbrook 
Seminary, which under his able 
management has entered on a new 
era of usefulness and prosperity, has been a 
resident of Deering since 1892. He was born 
February 5, 1844, in Woodstock, Me., son of 
Harrison and Delphina (Perham) Whitman. 
His great-grandfather, Jacob Whitman, was a 
patriot soldier of the Revolutionary War. 

Harrison Whitman was a native of Wood- 
stock, and received his education in the com- 
mon schools of that town. He remained with 
his parents on the farm, and throughout the 
active period of his life was engaged in agri- 
culture. At the time of the Aroostook War 
he was made Captain of a company of infan- 
try organized to take part in that contest. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Delphina 
Perham, was born in Woodstock. They had 
a family of four children, three of whom are 
now living, namely: George Washington, 
residing in Norway, Me.; Angela, the wife 
of Rufus Farrar; and Harrison Spofford, the 
leading subject of the present sketch. 

Harrison S. Whitman was first an attendant 
of the public schools of Woodstock, later of 
the Norway Liberal Institute; and in 1864 he 
entered Bowdoin College, from which he was 
graduated with honor in the class of 1869, 
being among the foremost in scholarship. 
Immediately after leaving college he accepted 
a position as principal of the high school at 
Thomaston, Me. ; and two years later he went 
to Dean Academy in Franklin, Mass., where 
for a year and a half he was Professor of Latin 
and Greek. In 1874 he entered the Divinity 
School of Tufts College, near Boston, Mass., 
for a three years' course; and shortly after 
completing his studies there he was ordained 
as pastor of the Mechanic Falls Universalist 
Church. During the six years that he had 
charge of that church its membership was 



largely increased, and provision was made for 
the payment of a heavy debt that had been in- 
curred. On leaving Mechanic Falls he ac- 
cepted a call to the Universalist chinch in 
Dexter, Me., where he ministered faithfully 
for three and a half years. He was installed 
as pastor of the Winthrop Street Universalist 
Church in Augusta in 1886, ami was closely 
identified with its work and interests until 
1890, when he accepted the position of State 
Missionary. The two years of his incumbency 
were characterized by able service, among his 
labors being the raising of a permanent mis- 
sionary fund of ten thousand dollars. 

In 1S92 Mr. Whitman entered his present 
position as President of Westbrook Seminary. 
Since he took charge of this institution its 
attendance has increased about forty per cent. 
He has also strengthened the corps of teachers, 
and advanced the grade of scholarship. The 
sum of twenty-five hundred dollars, which has 
been received from the alumni, has been used 
in making various needed repairs and altera- 
tions; and at the present time he is interested 
in a movement to raise ten thousand dollars 
to be added to the endowment fund of tin- 
seminary. 

On June 5, 1879, the Rev. Harrison S. 
Whitman was joined in marriage with Miss 
Susan Frances Warren, who is a lady of supe- 
rior ability and attainments, a daughter of 
Chadbourne Warren, of Great Falls, N.H. 

When in Dexter, Mr. Whitman served as 
Supervisor of Schools; ami he was Secretary 
of the Maine State Universalist Convention 
for four or five years before he became the 
State Missionary. He is a member of the 
Masonic Lodge of Mechanic Falls and of Asy- 
lum Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows of Augusta. 




EV. EPHRAIM CHAMBERLAIN 
CUMMINGS, A.M., was born in 
Albany, Me., September 2, 1825. 
His father was Francis Cummings, 
a man of enterprise and public spirit, chiefly 
engaged in farming with some lumbering oper- 
ations upon wild lands in which he was inter- 
ested. His mother was Lois (Chamberlain) 
Cummings, daughter of Deacon Ephraim 



3° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Chamberlain of Waterford, a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War. 

Mr. Cummings's paternal grandfather, Asa 
Cummings, was one of the pioneers of the 
town of Albany, of patriarchal character, a 
Deacon of the Congregational church, who 
regularly conducted religious services, when 
there was no settled minister. lie kept the 
records of the town for a long series of years, 
and was a Revolutionary soldier. 

Ephraim Chamberlain Cummings left his 
home in Albany after the death of his mother, 
when quite young, and came to Portland to 
live with his uncle, Dr. Asa Cummings, edi- 
tor of the Christian Mirror. He prepared for 
college at North Yarmouth Academy, and 
when not quite sixteen years of age entered the 
class of 1844 at Bowdoin. But the state of 
his health was not deemed equal to a college 
course at that time; ami it was not till after 
some years of alternate labor and study in the 
country, and still other years in his uncle's 
office in Portland, that he again entered Bow- 
doin College, where he graduated in the class 
of 1853. 

He became a teacher during that fall and 
winter in the Bucksport Academy. The fol- 
lowing summer he taught the Augusta High 
School, and in the year 1855 was a tutor of 
Latin and mathematics at Bowdoin. Though 
he was not averse to mathematics, his early 
preference was for philosophical studies and 
the languages. His home associations, train- 
ing and intellectual tendencies led him toward 
the Congregational ministry. He entered 
Bangor Theological Seminary the same year 
that he was tutor, and was graduated in 1857. 
In March of the following year he became 
minister of the First Congregational Church 
in Brewer, and in May, i860, he assumed the 
pastorate of the North Congregational Church 
in St. Johnsbury, Vt. For nine months, in 
the years 1862-63, he served as Chaplain in 
the Fifteenth Regiment of Vermont Volun- 
teers, of which Redfield Proctor, afterward 
Secretary of War, and now United States 
Senator, was the brave and efficient Colonel. 
While residing in St. Johnsbury Mr. Cum- 
mings made his first tour in Europe and the 
Orient, remaining ten months. 

The Rev. Ephraim C. Cummings was mar- 



ried October 18, 1S66, at Portland, Me., to 
Miss Annie Louise Pomeroy, daughter of the 
Rev. Swan Lyman Pomeroy, D.D., of this 
city, and in 1869, with his wife, again crossed 
the ocean, remaining in Europe nearly two 
years. He was in Rome at the time of 
the Ecumenical Council, saw and heard some 
distinguished representatives of the Roman 
church; and in Germany he witnessed the 
memorable demonstrations of triumph after 
the Franco-Prussian War. He saw the old 
Emperor, William I., the Crown Prince Fred- 
erick, and the great Bismarck and Von Moltke, 
then in the zenith of their power. 

Since his return in 1871, Mr. Cummings has 
been a resident of Portland. In December, 
1872, he was appointed Provisional Professor 
of Mental and Moral Philosophy in Bowdoin 
College. This engagement expired at the end 
of the college year in 1873, and since then he 
has devoted most of his time to his studies, 
which are of a nature to demand a more or less 
retired life, and exemption from distracting 
professional efforts. He has been, and is, a 
student of current as well as classical litera- 
ture, but his mental energies have been di- 
rected mainly to theological and philosophical 
subjects. 

In 1873 Mr. Cummings published a volume 
of discourses entitled "Birth and Baptism," 
and in 1885 another work called "Nature in 
Scripture." With reference to this book it is 
enough to quote the words of the late Thomas 
Hill, D.D., LL.D. , sometime President of 
Harvard University, afterward pastor of the 
First Parish Church in Portland, Me., a ven- 
erable name with which any author might be 
happy to have his work associated: — "One 
hundred and forty-nine years ago, Joseph 
Butler published his immortal 'Analogy.' 
Taking, as it were, a text from Origen, he 
illustrated it by a profound series of argu- 
ments, in which he shows that the very objec- 
tions raised by deists of that age against 
Christianity, lie with equal force against ad- 
mitting the existence of a Divine Providence. 
No weightier line of thought and argument 
ever came from the pen of an English theo- 
logian. And now, after the lapse of nearly a 
century and a half, Mr. Cummings has given 
to Portland the honor of first producing a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3' 



worthy companion and complement of 'The 
Analogy of Religion, Natural and Revealed, 
to the Constitution and Course of Nature.' 
That work was confined to the task of showing 
that the difficulties and mysteries of religion 
have their perfect parallel in the difficulties 
and mysteries of nature. This takes up, in an 
equally broad and comprehensive manner, the 
other half of the subject, and shows that the 
general doctrines and teaching of the Hebrew 
and Christian Scriptures are»in precise accord- 
ance with the general course of that education 
by which nature and experience begin the de- 
velopment of the mind and character of man. 
If the reader will have the patience to read 
the volume carefully, chapter by chapter, in 
order, he will find it full of unexpected light. 
He must be a well-read theological scholar if 
he does not find it in the highest degree in- 
structive; anil he must lack all interest in re- 
ligious themes if he does not find the volume 
interesting." 

Mr. Cummings is also the author of a work 
entitled "The Great Question, or Twelve 
Lessons in the Faith," besides various papers 
read before the Maine Historical Society, 
especially those concerning the Catholic mis- 
sions of the Jesuit period, not to mention con- 
tributions to the newspaper press. 

The labor of such men as Mr. Cummings, 
though in general but faintly appreciated by 
the bulk of society, is doubtless of benefit and 
importance to mankind. Few men, even when 
possessing the inclination, are able to devote 
much time to the study of the higher problems 
of life. The busy cares and tumultuous anxie- 
ties which press sternly on every hand and 
confront the majority of men, with threaten- 
ing mien, in the daily struggle for existence, 
force them to concentrate their faculties upon 
material, rather than on spiritual things; it is 
left therefore, to a chosen few, whose natural 
bent, acquired scholarship, and greater free- 
dom from material cares, fit them for such 
pursuits, to devote their talents and opportu- 
nities to research in the higher realms of 
thought, that through their efforts in co-opera- 
tion with recognized teachers having more di- 
rect access to the popular mind, the dark tide 
of modern materialism and unbelief may be 
stemmed, and every human soul have the 



strengthening assurance that in the acceptance 
of revealed religion our trust is not founded 
upon "cunningly devised fables," but on the 
eternal truth of nature, the testimony not 
alone of man, but of God and his universe. 

A general characteristic of Mr. Cummings 
is his entire freedom from dogmatism. His 
thoughts take a wide range and he is toler- 
ant of wide diversities of opinion and belief. 
His satisfaction and reward in bis work must 
lie in the fact that it is intimately connected 
with the progress of mankind in those season- 
able revelations of truth, that make for the 
practice of righteousness, and the life erf faith, 
hope, and charity. 

Mr. Cummings is Vice-President, and a 
regular attendant, of the Fraternity Club of 
Portland, whose members are mostly men of 
strong intellectual bent, who delight in dis- 
cussions which tax the highest human facul- 
ties. Mr. Cummings is always listened to 
with pleasure and profit, and highly appre- 
ciated for his amplitude of information and 
readiness in its use. He is also a Trustee of 
the Portland Public Library. 




ON. LEANDER VALENTINE, the 
first Mayor of Westbrook, Me., was 
born in Westbrook, March 14, 
1 8 14. He was the son of William 
and Abigail (Spring) Valentine, and the scion 
of an ancient family, many generations of 
which were born in Eccles, England. The 
immigrant Valentines settled in Massachu- 
setts; and in Hopkinton, that State, William, 
the father of the Hon. Lcander Valentine, was 
born on April 14, 1773. In 1S03 he removed 
to Westbrook, Me. (then Falmouth), where 
for some time he was engaged in the manu- 
facture of nails; and he was also for a while 
in the grocery trade. In 181 5, disposing of 
his other business, he turned his attention 
wholly to farming, which occupied his time 
during the remainder of his life. A Demo- 
crat in politics, he took an active interest in 
public affairs, serving efficiently as Selectman 
of the town for several years; and he was one 
of the original Trustees of the Saccarappa 
Grammar School Association. He died in 
Westbrook, April 16, 1845. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Lcander Valentine received his education 
in the common schools of Westbrook and at 
the Westbrook Seminary. He taught school 
in his early manhood, from 1835 to 1854, most 
of the time within the limits of his native 
town. Subsequently he was engaged in the 
grocery trade at Saccarappa, first with T. B. 
Edwards, afterward as successively a member 
of the firms of Valentine, Hardy & Co. and 
Valentine & Pennell. A capable and in- 
fluential business man, he was elected Presi- 
dent of the Westbrook Trust Company at the 
time of its incorporation in 1890, and re- 
mained in office up to the time of his death. 
In politics he was a Republican from the or- 
ganization of the party, and one of its stanch 
supporters. In the early days of Westbrook 
he served as Selectman for two years, and he 
was a member of the School Committee twelve 
years. He represented the town in the legis- 
lature of 1847-48, was a member of the State 
Senate in 1849; and in 1850-52 he was a 
member of Governor John Hubbard's Execu- 
tive Council. He was appointed by President 
Lincoln weigher and gauger at the Portland 
custom-house in 1861, and after serving 
creditably for six years was promoted to the 
position of Assistant Appraiser. One year 
later he succeeded to the Appraisership, an 
office which he held for nine years. He was 
then forced to resign on account of ill health. 
In 1 89 1 Westbrook was incorporated as a city, 
and it was natural and fitting that the voters 
should call their foremost citizen to the chief 
executive's chair. Mr. Valentine served one 
year with credit as Mayor; and at the end of 
his term, feeling the weight of increasing 
years, retired from public life; but, though 
freed from the responsibility and care of office, 
he was not forgotten by his fellow-citizens, 
his advice and counsel being constantly sought. 
He died July 23, 1895. 

August 28, 1842, Mr. Valentine was mar- 
ried to Margaret W., daughter of Joseph W. 
and Alice Coolbroth, of Gorham, Me. Mrs. 
Valentine died May 23, 1892. She had but 
one child, a daughter, whom they named 
Marcena Adriana. This child was born May 
16, 1845, anc l died April 1, 1846. 

In religion Mr. Valentine was a Universal- 
ist. He was always a generous supporter of 



the church of his choice; and at his death he 
bequeathed the society one thousand dollars as 
an endowment, the interest only to be i*sed. 
He also bequeathed one thousand dollars to 
Westbrook Seminary. He was a man of very 
engaging social qualities, possessed of wide 
general information and good conversational 
powers. Every one enjoyed his company, and 
delighted to hear him talk. Liberal and op- 
timistic, he always looked on the bright side 
of life, and never lost confidence in mankind. 
All who knew him reposed in him the utmost 
confidence, and in his long life he never did 
anything to shake their trust. 

This sketch was prepared by Charles P. 
Woodman, of Westbrook, who was for many 
years a townsman of Mr. Valentine. 



YJ2)TARTWELL LITTLE, a prosperous 
I ; I farmer of Brunswick, has a pleasant 
\(s I home about a mile and a half from 

— the village on the River Road. He 
was born in Whitefield, Me., December 10, 
1837, son of Samuel and Hannah (Boynton) 
Little. Mr. Little's paternal grandfather, 
who also bore the name of Samuel, was a na- 
tive of Whitefield, but spent the greater part 
of his life in Pittston, Me. A cooper by 
trade, he was likewise a successful farmer. 
He died at the age of seventy-eight. 

His son, Samuel Little, the father of Hart- 
well, was born in Pittston, and reared to farm 
life. He learned the trade of a ship carpen- 
ter, and followed it for many years, acquiring 
a sufficiency of this world's goods. He is now 
living on a farm in Bowdoinham, Me., at the 
advanced age of eighty-four. Mr. Samuel 
Little is a man of intelligence and good judg- 
ment, a fact fully recognized by the citizens 
of Whitefield during his residence in that 
town, who made him Selectman and Town 
Treasurer. His wife, who also has attained 
the age of fourscore and four, was born in 
Alna, Lincoln County, Me., daughter of John 
Boynton, a well-to-do farmer. Mr. and Mrs. 
Samuel Little are members of the Baptist 
church. They have had eleven children, 
eight of whom arc yet living, namely: Albion; 
Hartwell; Harriet, wife of Nathan B. Peasley, 
of Whitefield; Celia, wife of L. W. Blen, of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



33 



San Jose, Cal. ; Henrietta A., wife of James 
A. Morse, of Zempa, Ariz. ; Melissa Ann, 
who is living with her parents; Zina F., a 
broker in Portland; and John, superintendent 
of Lord & Taylor's dry-goods establishment 
in New York. The two last named are twins. 

Hartwell Little remained with his parents 
until he was twenty-one years of age. He 
acquired the rudiments of his education in the 
common schools, finished his course of study 
at the Pittston Academy, and then taught in a 
district school in Pittston. On attaining his 
majority he went to California, where he at 
first rented and afterward purchased a farm. 
There he remained seven years, engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, and teaching school at 
intervals. In 1866 he returned East and set- 
tled on the farm which he now occupies, a fine 
estate of one hundred and twenty-five acres, 
beautifully located. Here for nearly thirty 
years he has been successfully engaged in gen- 
eral farming, making a specialty of fruit rais- 
ing. He also has a choice dairy, which now 
includes fourteen cows. For ten years, from 
1882 to 1892, he had a milk route and em- 
ployed a team, supplying customers in Bruns- 
wick. He then kept eighteen cows; but, 
finding the work too arduous in connection 
with his other interests, he disposed of some 
of his cows, and gave up the route. He has 
some fine live stock on his farm, and raises a 
number of horses. Mr. Little is a charter 
member of the Patrons of Husbandry. He has 
served for some time as Assistant Steward of 
the State Grange, and has served as Master of 
the local Grange. 

On March 10, 1863, he was married to 
Lovesta F., daughter of Deacon Peter King, 
a manufacturer of edge tools in Whitefield 
and one of the prominent men of the town, 
which was Mrs. Little's birthplace. Mr. and 
Mrs. Little have two sons, Charles Winfield 
and Harry Hartwell. Charles W. Little, 
who is a farmer in Brunswick, married Carrie 
Griffin, of Freeport, and has two children — 
Florence May and Winfield Edward. Harry 
Hartwell Little, who also is a farmer, resides 
with his father. He married Mary Way, of> 
Lawrence, Mass., and has four children — 
Gladys Lovesta, Samuel, Jennie M., and 
Clara Belle (the last two being twins). 



Mr. Little is prominent in the councils of 
the Democratic party in his district, and was 
in the State legislature in 1874 and 1875. 
He is a member of the United Lodge, No. 8, 
A. F. & A. M., and of the Order of the 
Golden Cross. He joined the Baptist church 
when he was fifteen years of age, and has for 
a long time been prominent in parish affairs, 
serving efficiently on the various committees 
and holding the office of superintendent of the 
Sunday-school for many years. Mrs. Little 
also is an esteemed member of the Baptist 
church. Mr. Little is a well-informed man, 
being one who reads a great deal and takes an 
especial interest in history and biography. 
Gifted with sound judgment in practical 
affairs, he has taken a leading part in local 
politics; and his opinions are always worthy 
of respect. 



KRY J. DAVIS, an esteemed citi- 
cn of Deering, who is now in busi- 
ness as a florist and landscape gar- 
dener at Deering Centre, was born 
in Westport, Me., Decembers, 1847. He is 
the son of Captain Daniel O. and Mary E. 
(Jewett) Davis, and comes of Revolutionary 
stock on the paternal side. 

His great-grandfather Davis, who was an 
officer in the Continental army, lost a limb 
while in the service; and after the war he was 
pensioned by the government and was granted 
a large tract of land in New Hampshire. His 
son John, the father of Daniel O. Davis, was 
in youth an expert tool-maker, and later was 
engaged in the marble business in New Hamp- 
shire. In 1849 he went to California and 
made a fortune in mining, later returning 
home to invest the money acquired. He died 
in Ohio. 

Daniel O. Davis entered the navy when a 
boy, and followed the sea for forty years 
as a master mariner. Being subsequently ap- 
pointed messenger in the custom-house at 
Portland, he performed the duties of that office 
for some time, resigning his position in 1895, 
and in April of that year going to California, 
where he is now supervisor of the office work 
of the Pleasanton Hop Company at Pleasanton. 
In politics a Republican, he represented West- 



34 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



port, Georgetown, and Boothbay in the State 
legislature in 1857-58, and was Chairman of 
the Board of Selectmen of Westport for years. 
Captain Davis is now about sixty-seven years 
of age, and is strong mentally and physically. 

His wife, Mary E. Jewett, was a daughter 
of Stephen and Mary (Quinn) Jewett, of Row- 
ley, Mass. Stephen Jewett was an enterpris- 
ing and successful man, a large farmer and 
mill-owner, who also owned many vessels en- 
gaged in plying between Maine ports and the 
West Indies, trading at various marts along 
the coast. He was likewise interested in the 
fisheries. Mrs. Davis died in California in 
1890. Of the children born to her and her 
husband, four are living — Henry J. ; Daniel 
O. , Jr. ; George A. ; and Emeline R. The 
latter married and lives in California. George 
A. Davis is general manager of the Pleasanton 
hop works, where his father is supervisor. 
Daniel O. , Jr., also lives in California. 

Henry J. Davis received his education in 
Westport, graduating from the- high school. 
He followed the sea for twenty years, ship- 
ping first before the mast, and rising gradually 
to the position of chief mate. He saw a great 
deal of the world while on the high seas, and 
about the time of the Franco-Prussian War, 
being then first mate of the hark "J. S. 
Winslow, " was in harbor in Belgium for a 
while. On the return of his vessel to America 
he accepted the position of engineer for the 
Portland Steam Packet Company, running be- 
tween Portland and Boston, and was first on 
the steamer "Forest City" and then on the 
"John Brooks," alternating between the two. 
He worked in this way for nine years, and then 
left the sea, taking charge of stationary en- 
gines in different localities for some years. 
Finally he engaged in floriculture in Deering 
Centre, starting in a small way, and now has 
a large trade in several States, the bulk of his 
business being in Maine. His establishment 
at 37 Central Avenue is well worth a visit, 
not only for the sake of the beautiful plants, 
hut also for the pleasure of meeting the genial 
proprietor, who is a man of diversified knowl- 
edge and courteous manners. 

In 1872 Mr. Davis was united in marriage 
with Harriet L. Morse, daughter of John R. 
and Harriet A. (Murch) Morse; and they have 



one daughter, Adele S. Davis. Mr. Davis is 
prominent in local politics, and in 1893 was 
elected to the Board of Aldermen of the city 
of Deering on the Republican ticket, as a mem- 
ber from Ward 3. He was subsequently 
twice re-elected, and is to hold office till 1897. 
He is an Odd Fellow, belonging to Ancient 
Brothers' Lodge of Portland, and is also a 
member of Munjoy Lodge of the Knights of 
Pythias. In religion he is of the liberal type 
of believers, attending with his family All 
Souls' Universalist Church of Deering. 



OSEPH WESCOTT PETERS, an es- 
teemed resident of Portland and super- 
intendent of the Portland & Rochester 
Railroad, was born at Blue Hill, Me., 
December 31, 1854, son of Joseph P. and 
Nancy A. (Wescott) Peters, both natives oi 
Blue Hill. Mr. Peters traces his descent to 
Andrew Peters, who was a distiller in Ipswich, 
Mass., in 1659. His great-great-grandfather, 
John Peters, was a resident of Andover, Mass. 
John Peters's son, John (second), who was born 
in that town, was a farmer and surveyor. He 
removed from Andover to Penobscot, Me., 
where he was employed in surveying by the 
State, and was one of the pioneer settlers of 
that locality. Lemuel Peters, grandfather of 
Joseph \\*. Peters, was a farmer and ship-builder 
at Blue Hill. His son Joseph, the father of 
Joseph W. , was a ship-master, spending much 
of his life on the sea. He was lost with his 
ship, which foundered during one of the Feb- 
ruary storms in the winter of 1863. His wife, 
Nancy, was a daughter of Archibald Wescott, 
a merchant of Penobscot, who was also engaged 
in farming to some extent. He was one of 
the old residents of Penobscot, and was well 
known and popular. Mrs. Peters died in 1S67, 
four years after her husband's tragic death. 
John P. Peters, uncle of Joseph W. , was a 
sailor residing in Boston, and died in 187^. 

Joseph Wescott Peters was educated at Blue 
Hill, attending the common schools and after- 
ward studying at Blue Hill Academy. He 
was eight years old when he lost his father, 
and at fifteen he went to work as a cash boy 
in a store in Boston. In 1866 he returned to 
Blue Hill and finished his education, working 




JAMES P. BAXTER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



37 



as a clerk in a grocery store during vacation 
time. In May, 1870, he obtained a position 
as clerk in the office of the treasurer of the 
Portland & Rochester Railroad. When the 
road tn Worcester was opened, in 1874, he was 
made paymaster ami general ticket agent, be- 
ing then but twenty years of age. When he 
took his position at Portland, the road extended 
only to Alfred, Me. In addition to his duties 
as general ticket agent, he performed those of 
train despatcher from 1S80 to 1882. In 1S82 
he was made superintendent of the road, and 
was acting general freight agent from 18S5 to 
1890, so that he was superintendent, general 
height agent, and general passenger agent 
at one time. From October, 1890, to July, 
1893, he was superintendent; and he was then 
again appointed general ticket agent, and, as 
a result, has practically full charge of the busi- 
ness of the road. The management of railroad 
traffic demands a quick eye and a cool head, 
rapidity in mathematical calculation and in the 
systematic arrangement of details. These qual- 
ities Mr. Peters possesses in an eminent degree. 
Politically, Mr. Peters favors the Democratic 
party. Me has served on the Democratic City 
Council, and is now a member of the County 
and the District Committee. He was elected 
Alderman from Ward Four in 1894, and served 
during his term of office on the Committee on 
Streets, on the Sanitary Commission, and on 
the Committee on Estimates for Appropria- 
tions. He was again elected Alderman in 
March, 1 S95, and is now on the Sanitary Com- 
mission and the Committees mi Judicial Pro- 
ceedings, Claims, and Public Works. He is 
also one of the Pack Pay and Fore River Com- 
missioners, taking a leading part in the pro- 
ceedings for the improvement of that locality. 
Mr. Peters belongs to the fraternal order of 
Elks, being a member of P. P. O. E. of Port- 
land, and a Trustee of the organization. 



"ON. JAMES PHINNEY BAXTER, 

the present Mayor of Pint land, was 
born in Gorham, Mc. , March 23, 
1 831, and was about nine years old 
in 1S40, his father, Dr. Elihu Baxter, 
removed from Gorham to this city, where he 
engaged in the practice of medicine. 




In 1859 Mr. Baxter formed business rela 
tionswith William G. Davis; and subsequently 
the two partners united with the firm of Kil- 
mer}' & Purnhani, under the style of the Port- 
land Packing Company. The provision pack- 
ing business was then in its infancy, but 
under the efficient management of the firm the 
business increased so rapidly that it gained a 
national reputation. Other enterprises have 
claimed the attention of Mr. Baxter, in each 
of which he has been uniformly successful, 
having acquired a large fortune. His marked 
skill in money matters has commended him to 
several of the leading financial institutions 
of Portland. He is Trustee of the Portland 
Savings Bank ; Vice-President of the Mer- 
chants' National Bank and of the Portland 
Provident Association; Vice-President of the 
Portland Trust Company, being one of the 
original Directors of this company, which is 
capitalized at one hundred thousand dollars. 

He is also Director of the Maine Industrial 
School and the Portland Benevolent Society, 
and President of the Maine Historical Society 
and of the Public Library, and is besides a 
working member of the American Historical 
Society of Washington, D. C. ; the New Eng- 
land Historic Genealogical Society of Boston ; 
the Old Colony Historical Society of Taun- 
ton, Mass. ; the Rhode Island Historical So- 
ciety; the American Antiquarian Society ol 
Worcester, Mass. ; and the Portland Society of 
Natural History. He has prepared and read 
a number of papers on historical and other sub- 
jects before most of the above-named societies. 

In 1893 Mr. Baxter was elected Mayor of 
Portland, and early in his first term he gave 
his salary of two thousand dollars to the 
School Board to maintain the Manual Training 
School for Boys. He was re-elected in 1804 
and again in 1895, and in the Mayoralty as 
elsewhere his business efficiency has accom- 
plished the most gratifying results. His pub- 
lic-spirited generosity is shown by his frequent 
and bountiful gifts to the city of Portland, 
among which may be named the elegant public 
library building on Congress Street, a monu- 
ment to his artistic and literary tastes. As an 
outgrowth of his interest in the Home fur 
Little Wanderers in Boston, he founded the 
Portland Associated Charities. 



38 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



While Mr. Baxter's varied ability and power 
ill adaptation have rendered him a most efficient 
functionary in city and State, his favorite 
field is literature; and his labors with the pen 
for the last twenty years have been constant 
and valuable. He was an early contributor 
to the New York Home Journal, Shillaber's 
Carpet Bag, and Godey's Ladies' Book. His 
annual addresses to the City Council during his 
period of office as Mayor are models of a clear, 
incisive style, placing before the city fathers 
in terse and forcible English the condition of 
the municipal departments and calling atten- 
tion to the city's most urgent needs. Of late 
years Mr. Baxter has given much attention to 
historical research, having in 1S85 made a 
prolonged visit to Europe, where he procured 
valuable historical data. The "English Col- 
onization of the New World " was the result of 
careful and discriminating study, as was also 
his work entitled "Western Civilization," the 
two being among the most important of his 
publications. "Idyls of the Year " is full of 
grace and possesses an interest for all true 
lovers of poetry. 

The following list of the printed works of 
Mr. Baxter is taken from the Bibliography of 
the American Historical Association: "Laus 
Laureati," a poem delivered before the Maine 
Historical Society on the celebration of Long- 
fellow's seventy-fifth birthday, Portland, 1882. 
"A Greeting to the Mentor," a poem deliv- 
ered on the eightieth birthday of Professor 
Packard, Longfellow's tutor, Portland, 1883. 
"The Great Seal of New England," Cam- 
bridge, 1884. "Idyls of the Year," poems, 
Portland, Hoyt, Fogg & Donham, 1884. 
"The Trelawny Papers," Portland, Fogg & 
Donham, 1884. "George Cleeve and his 
Times," Portland, Gorges Society, 1S85. 
"The British Invasion from the North." 
Albany, Munsell (Historical Series), 1887. 
"Documentary History of Maine," vol. iv. , 
Portland, Maine Historical Society, 18S9. 
"Early Voyages to America," Providence, 
Rhode Island, Historical Society, 1889. Ibid., 
Old Colony Historical Society's Collections, 
No. 4, Taunton, Mass., 1889. "Sir Eerdinando 
Gorges and his Province of Maine," Boston, 
Prince Society, 1890. "The Abanakis, " New 
England Magazine, Boston, September, 1890. 



"Reminiscences of a Great Enterprise," 
Portland, 1890. "The Campaign against the 
Pequakets : Its Cause and its Results," Port- 
land, 1890. "The Beginnings of Maine,'' 
Portland, 1891. "A Lost Manuscript," Port- 
land, 1 891. "Isaac Jogues, a.d. 1636," 
New York, 1891. "The Abanakis and their 
Ethnic Relations," Portland, 1892. "A 
Period of Peril," address delivered at City 
Hall, Portland, on the Centennial Celebration 
of the Adoption of the Constitution of the 
United States, April 30, 1889. "Three 
Suggestive Maps," Maine Historical Quar- 
terly, January, 1893. "The Observatory," 
an illustrated poem, The Stevens & Jones 
Company, Portland, 1S93. "Christopher 
Levett, the First Owner of the Soil of Port- 
land," Maine Historical Quarterly, April and 
July, 1893. "Christopher Levett, the Pioneer 
Colonist in Casco Bay," Portland, Gorges 
Society, 1S93. "Pioneers of New France in 
New England," Albany, Munsell (Historical 
Series), 1894. "Raleigh's Lost Colony," 
illustrated, New England Magazine, January, 
1895. 

In politics Mr. Baxter is Republican. He 
is a man of liberal ideas; and his political, 
commercial, and literary career has ever been 
characterized by honor, 

" The finest sense 
Of Justice which the human mind can frame." 




iHARLES HANSON NELSON, of 
New Gloucester, who occupies a place 
of prominence among the enterpris- 
ing young farmers of Cumberland 
County, was born in this town, August 5, 
1862. He is a son of the Hon. Otis C. and 
Julie B. (Bailey) Nelson, his father being an 
extensive farmer and fruit grower here. (A 
sketch of the Hon. Otis C. Nelson may be 
found on another page of this volume.) 

Charles Hanson Nelson was the second 
child born to his parents. His elementary 
education, obtained in the common schools of 
his native town, was supplemented by a course 
of study at Greeley Institute, Cumberland, 
and North Bridgton Academy. On leaving 
school Mr. Nelson taught two terms in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



39 



district schools of New Gloucester, and at 
the close of his second winter term was united 
in marriage with Abbie Stevens Jordan, their 
nuptials being celebrated May 5, 1885. Mrs. 
Nelson is a daughter of John W. and Arabella 
(Lunt) Jordan, well-known farmers of this 
town. A month after their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Nelson removed to their present home, 
which he then purchased. This valuable es- 
tate, which was formerly known as the Cush- 
roan farm, contains two hundred and fifty 
acres of land, on which Mr. Nelson has made 
many and valuable improvements, placing a 
large part of it in an excellent state of tillage. 
Here Mr. Nelson carries on general farming, 
including the raising of fruit, sweet corn, and 
small grains, one of his most profitable indus- 
tries at this time being his dairy of twenty- 
three cows, the product of which he ships to 
Portland, Me., which is the headquarters for 
milk raised in this section of the State. In 
his agricultural pursuits Mr. Nelson has shown 
sound judgment and skill, and has met with 
deserved success. In politics he is a stanch 
member of the Democratic party. The happy 
union of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson has been bright- 
ened by the birth of seven children, namely: 
Lilian Frances, born April 19, 1886, died 
September 17, 1886; Julia Bell, born August 
25, [887; John Otis, born December 5, 1888; 
Edwin Wilbur, born November 29, 1890; Ida 
Wheeler, born March 17, 1893; George 
Howard, born April 12, 1894, died December 
1, 1894; Harold Crosby, born November 4, 
1895. 




iNRY SARGENT TRICKEY, City 
Marshal of Portland, was born there, 
October 14, 1842, son of Henry and 
Abigail C. (Larrabee) Trickey. 
His grandfather was Daniel Trickey, of West- 
brook, Me. Daniel was also born in the 
county. On leaving the parental home he 
settled in the town of Westbrook, where he 
spent his life in clearing and improving a 
fine farm. 

Henry Trickey, son of Daniel, was born on 
the homestead, and there spent his boyhood 
days, usefully employed in occupations per- 
taining; to farm life. When the time came for 



him to select a regular calling, he went to 
Portland and learned the trade of a ship car- 
penter. He was successfully engaged in this 
business for a number of years, during which 
he worked on contracts, employing many as- 
sistants, and became one of the best-known 
ship-building contractors of the city. He was 
a Democrat in his political views until 1856, 
when he became a Republican, and thereafter 
continued to hold the views of the latter party. 
During the Civil War he served in the City 
Council. Among the fraternal orders with 
which he was affiliated were the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Maine Charitable 
Mechanic Association, and the Aged Brother- 
hood. His wife was a daughter of Benjamin 
Larrabee, of Westbrook, a highly respected 
agriculturist and a large land-owner. They 
were the parents of four children, as follows: 
Sarah J., the wife of John Gilkey, of Port- 
land; Mary I., who died in 1887; Benjamin 
Larrabee Trickey, of Portland; and Henry 
Sargent Trickey. The father, who was a 
member of the Protestant Episcopal church, 
died at his home on Paris Street in Jan- 
uary, 1878. The mother's death occurred 
about twenty years previously, on April 1, 
1858. 

Henry Sargent Trickey, having obtained his 
education in the public and private schools of 
Portland, was engaged as a clerk by R. I. Rob- 
inson. He had been employed here but a brief 
time when the civil strife broke out, and he 
enlisted in Company B of the Seventeenth 
Maine Volunteer Infantry. His regiment was 
at once ordered to Washington to assist in 
the fortification of that place, and later to 
the Army of the Potomac. A short time after 
he was severely injured and incapacitated 
for all except special detail service. He, 
however, continued in the service for the full 
term of his enlistment, and was honorably dis- 
charged July 27, 1865. On his return to 
Portland he was employed by Jonathan Smith 
& Co. in their belt manufactory, and worked 
for them and their successor, H. M. Brewer, 
for nine years. He next engaged in the re- 
tail grocery business on Cumberland Street, 
and during the succeeding seven years carried 
on a successful trade. In 1S81 he was ap- 
pointed Inspector of Customs by Lot M. 



4° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Morrell, the Collector of the Port, and re- 
mained in the custom service until after the 
appointment of Samuel J. Anderson as Col- 
lector, by whom he was discharged October 
31, 1886, as alleged, solely on political 
grounds. In September, 1S87, he engaged 
in the manufacture of shoemakers' supplies, 
such as heels, counters, and stiffenings, 
employing several hands. He continued in 
that business until May, 1890, when he was 
elected by the city government as agent for 
the sale of intoxicating liquors in the city of 
Portland, and held that office until May, 1892. 
Following that he took up the real estate busi- 
ness until the spring of 1893. He was then 
appointed Chief of Police by the Mayor, James 
P. Baxter, and was reappointed to the same 
office in 1894 and 1895 and 1896 by the same 
chief magistrate. The department has been 
enlarged and improved since he entered it; 
and he now has sixty-two men under his super- 
vision, including forty regular patrol men, 
two deputies, twelve specials, and two patrol 
wagon drivers. 

Mr. Trickey is one of the most active 
workers in the Republican ranks, ami for a 
number of years has served as both Treasurer 
and Chairman of the Republican City Com- 
mittee and as a delegate to State and other 
conventions. He is a member of Lincoln 
Club of Beacon Lodge, Independent Order of 
< Idd Fellows, and the Eastern Star Encamp- 
ment, having filled all the chairs in both, and 
is a member of the Grand Lodge of Maine. 
I [e was one of the first to become a member of 
Bosworth Post, No. 2, Grand Army of the 
Republic, joining in 1S67, and has served ac- 
ceptably in several of the offices. He is also 
a member of the Maine Charitable Mechanic 
Association. Mr. Trickey is a communicant 
of St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, in which 
he holds the office of Vestryman, and has 
been Treasurer for twelve years. His mar- 
riage with Miss Sarah Emma Chandler, a 
daughter of D. H. Chandler, the leader of the 
old Portland band, was celebrated on Septem- 
ber 1, iS6q. They have one daughter, Edith, 
who is still at home. For the past eight years 
his home has been at 122 Emery Street. Prior 
to that he resided at the old homestead, which 
he still owns. 



7"yiARLLS H. OSBORNE, a native of 
I \y Portland, was one of triplets, two 

\~U boys and a girl, born December 23, 

1832, to the Rev. Charles F. and 
Susan (Leavis) Osborne. An account of his 
ancestral history may be found in the sketch of 
Mr. Osborne's brother, Woodbridge G. Os- 
borne, published on another page of this 
volume. Mr. Osborne acquired a practical 
eduation in the schools of Searboro and Lim- 
ington, and began life for himself as a clerk in 
a grocery store. He subsequently clerked in a 
clothing store in Portland, going from there to 
Dover, N.H., where he was employed for three 
years in the drug store of John B. Wheeler. 
Returning to his native city, Mr. Osborne 
worked for three years in the retail grocery 
store of Dunn & Osborne. He then went into 
the clothing business with I. P. Farrington, 
carrying it on two years. In 1855, in company 
with his brother, John A. Osborne, he bought 
seventy acres of land in the town of Gorham ; 
and, after managing it a while in partnership, 
Mr. Osborne bought out his brother's interest, 
and has since been prosperously engaged in 
general farming. He is a skilled and prac- 
tical agriculturist, and his property is well 
improved and in excellent condition. 

On February 9, 1866, Mr. Osborne was 
united in wedlock with Mrs. Sarah Hay ward, 
ucc Holmes. They are the parents of three 
children, as follows: Sumner L., born June 
20, 1867, was married in October, 1894, to 
Isabelle Durell, of Hyde Park, Mass.; Irving, 
born June 6, 1869, was graduated from Bow- 
cloin College, ami is now a teacher in the 
high school at Winthrop, Mass.; ami Lillie 
Emily, born July 26, 1874, lives in Boston. 
Mr. Osborne supports the principles of the 
Democratic party ; and, religiously, he and all 
of his family are members of the Congrega- 
tional church. He is a Knight of Pythias, 
belonging to Gorham Lodge, No. 24. 




LLIAM YORKE, engineer of the 
Portland Gas Light Company, whose 
office is at 40 West Commercial 
Street, Portland, was born in Philadelphia, 
Pa., July 14, 1820, son of William and Ann 
(Price) Yorke. His father, who was an archi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



41 



tect in Philadelphia, died in 1830; and his 
mother's death occurred in 1856. There were 
six children; namely, Charles, Albert, Will- 
iam, John S., Mary F., and Anna. 

William Yorke received a good education, 
attending first a private school and later the 
public schools of his native city. He worked 
for a short time as errand boy in a dry-goods 
store. At the age of fifteen he was appren- 
ticed for six years to a pattern-maker and ma- 
chinist. The two following years he worked 
at pattern -making in Savannah, and subse- 
quently started an iron foundry and machine- 
shop in Augusta, Ga. He had not sufficient 
capital to make a success of this last enter- 
prise; and within two years he abandoned it, 
ami turned his attention to mill building. 
Maintaining his headquarters at Macon, he es- 
tablished mills in different parts of the State 
of Georgia. He was engaged in this way for 
seven years ; and subsequently, until the break- 
ing out of the war, he was in the lumber busi- 
ness near Macon. In 1861 Mr. Yorke was the 
owner of a large amount of property in pine 
forests, mills, and lumber; and, instead of 
taking advantage of the offers of the Confeder- 
ate government to allow every one so disposed 
to leave for the North, he remained to look 
after his interests, thinking, as did many 
others, that the war would last but a few 
months. Then his troubles began. Conscrip- 
tion officers were sent through the different 
districts to press men for the Confederate ser- 
vice, and for two years Mr. Yorke kept out of 
the army by bribing these men, paying out in 
all some fifteen thousand dollars in Confeder- 
ate scrip, as the men were changed every few 
months. At length, his patience and money 
nearly exhausted, he appealed to Mr. Adams, 
also a Philadelphian, who was superintendent 
of the South-western Railroad, and through 
his influence procured a situation in the ma- 
chine-shops of the road. Here for two years 
he was secure from persecution, as all railroad 
men were exempted from service. But a de- 
termination to get out of the South had now 
taken strong possession of him; ami, in com- 
pany with another Philadelphian, George A. 
Mcllhenny, superintendent of the Macon Gas 
Works, who shared his desire, he planned a 
way of escape. 



It was arranged that Mr. Yorke should go to 
Savannah, ostensibly to buy salt: and, the way 
being clear, he should telegraph to Mr. Mc- 
llhenny for one hundred empty sacks — the 
signal for him to join him. The clay that 
Sherman and his army left Atlanta Mr. Yorke 
left Macon for Savannah, provided with a pass 
from Mr. Adams. On reaching Savannah he 
purchased the salt, telegraphed Mr. Mc- 
llhenny, and made arrangements with a Con- 
federate officer then on furlough, who owned a 
plantation several miles outside of Savannah, 
for effecting their escape to St. Catharine's 
Island. This island is twelve or fifteen miles 
from the coast; and the officer agreed for three 
thousand dollars in Confederate money to row 
the two Philadelphians to St. Catharine's in 
his own boat — the only row-boat in the sec- 
tion, as the Confederate government had de- 
stroyed all they could find. On Mr. Mc- 
Ilhenny's arrival the two men lay concealed 
one night, hiring the following night a car- 
riage to drive to the plantation. The driver 
of the carriage knew the exact time when he 
could pass the rebel picket lines safely, and. 
within a few hours "three men in a boat" 
were en voyage for St. Catharine's. But a 
storm came up; and they were compelled to 
land a few miles from shore, on a desolate- 
island covered with oyster shells. Here Mr. 
Mcllhenny and the Confederate fell asleep: 
and Mr. Yorke, who, providentially, was un- 
able to close his eyes, rescued their frail craft 
just in the nick of time, as the incoming tide 
was sweeping it away, and thereafter watched 
it vigilantly till morning. At daybreak they 
continued on their way, and arrived at St. 
Catherine's safely, dismissing their boatman 
with his promised fee. The island was in- 
habited by seven or eight old negroes, who had 
been left there by their owners as useless. 
From them they learned that the United 
States blockade vessel "Fernandina," a brig in 
command of Captain Williams, lay about four 
or five miles off, and some of the crew were 
then on the island hunting the wild cattle for 
food. The negroes introduced them to these 
men, informing them that the Philadelphians 
wished to secured passage on the vessel: but 
the sailors suspected they were spies, and re- 
fused to accede to their request. At length, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



however, a boat was sent ashore fully officered 
and armed, and they were taken to the brig as 
prisoners. The Philadelphians were informed 
that a supply vessel would be along in a couple 
of weeks, and they might be sent by that to 
Hilton Head, S.C., then held by the Union 
forces. Ten or twelve days later they were 
transferred to this vessel, and when they 
reached Hilton Head were allowed to stay at a 
hotel, as they had money to pay their bills, 
but still under guard as prisoners. The 
steamship "Arrago" was then making weekly 
trips between New York and Hilton Head; 
and on the "Arrago" they were sent to New 
York as prisoners of war, placed at first with 
the Confederate prisoners and treated with 
scant ceremony. This treatment Mr. Yorke 
complained of, stating that they were gentle- 
men, with money to pay for their passage; and 
the second day out the Captain sent for them, 
and they had an interview in his cabin, with 
pleasant results. They arrived in New York 
City on the famous "black carpet-baggers' 
night," in October, 1864, when all the hotels 
were to have been simultaneously fired, a plot 
which most happily fell through. In com- 
pany with the Captain of the Union forces, 
who had the prisoners in charge, Mr. Yorke 
and Mr. Mcllhenny saw some of the sights of 
New York ; and during their tour the Philadel- 
phians lost the Captain, but they met him 
next morning at his headquarters, as per 
agreement, and by him were sent to the head- 
quarters of General John A. Dix, who was in 
command of the forces in New York. From 
him they obtained papers of release, and left 
New York by the first train they could get 
for Philadelphia. Mr. Yorke had with him 
twenty-eight hundred dollars in greenbacks, 
which he had secured during the last seven or 
eight months of his residence in Macon by 
trading with a Jew pedler who had access to 
the Union soldiers in rebel prisons, giving to 
the Jew five dollars in Confederate money for 
one dollar in United States currency. He 
lost over forty thousand dollars in real and 
personal estate through the war. After a stay 
of two months in Philadelphia Mr. Mcllhenny 
was appointed superintendent of the Washing- 
ton (D.C.) Gas Light Company's works at 
the capita], with Mr. Yorke as assistant. 



The latter held his position four years, and in 
1868 was assigned to the post he now holds. 
For twenty-seven years he has been the effi- 
cient and esteemed engineer of the Portland 
Gas Light Company; and his principal busi- 
ness interests have for many years been cen- 
tred in the city of Portland, as he disposed of 
his Southern property at the close of the war. 

Mr. Yorke married Lucy A. McKenny, 
daughter of Abner McKenny, of Maine; and 
one daughter, Louie E., has blessed their 
union. In politics Mr. Yorke is a Democrat. 
With his family he attends the Universalist 
church. He is one of the oldest residents of 
Portland and a representative citizen of that 
thriving city. 




ALVIN S. SAWYER, a retired sea 
captain of Yarmouth, who resides at 
his pleasant home on Cousins 
Island, was born on Chebeague 
Island, May 10, 1850, son of Jacob E. and 
Sarah (Hamilton) Sawyer. His father, who 
was born upon the same island, September 14, 
1825, at an early age adopted a seafaring life, 
which he followed for many years. He was 
thrifty and industrious, and owned land upon 
Chebeague, Cousins, and Little John's Islands, 
residing at intervals on each, but spending a 
greater part of his life, when not at sea, on 
Chebeague. His death occurred January 22, 
1887. He was liberal in his religious views 
and a Republican in politics. His wife, 
Sarah Hamilton, who was born on Chebeague 
Island, September 17, 1824, became the mother 
of four children, as follows: Calvin S., the 
subject of this sketch; Smith D., who was 
born Ap"ril 10, 1853, and resides in Yar- 
mouth; Georgia A., who was born May 5, 
i860, is now Mrs. Merrill, and lives on 
Cousins Island; and Serena A., who became 
Mrs. Groves, and died October 6, 1873. Mrs. 
Jacob E. Sawyer died April 5, 1889. 

Calvin S. Sawyer received his education at 
the school on Cousins Island. At the age of 
sixteen he began the life of a sailor in the 
coasting trade, and followed that occupation 
steadily for several years. For two years 
previous to his retirement from the sea he 
was Captain of a steamer which plied between 




GEORGE R. SKOLFIELD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



45 



points along the coast. Since 1889 he has 
been occupied in farming and attending to his 
real estate interests, having recently disposed 
of some land on Little John's Island. His 
property on Cousins Island consists of forty- 
eight acres of valuable land, on which he is 
prosperously carrying on general farming and 
dairying. His residence, which is a land- 
mark, was built by Ebenezer Cleaves, and is 
the only brick house upon the island. 

On December 22, 1875, Mr. Sawyer was 
united in marriage to Lizzie C. Prince, a na- 
tive of North Yarmouth. Mrs. Sawyer, who 
was born December 4, 1 850, is a daughter of 
Joseph R. and Cordelia C. Prince, her father, 
who was a prosperous farmer of North Yar- 
mouth, being born in Cumberland July 14, 

1812, and dying January 14, 1882. His wife, 
Cordelia C. Prince, who was born August 8, 

18 1 3, reared but one child, Lizzie C. Mrs. 
Sawyer's mother, who still survives, resides 
with her. Mr. and Mrs. Sawyer have four 
children, namely: Emery R., born December 
29, 1876; Louise E., November 17, 1878; 
Rena B., April 13, 1884: and Harold S., Oc- 
tober 2, 1886. 

In politics Mr. Sawyer supports the Repub- 
lican party, and he is a member of the Baptist 
church. He is connected with Ancient 
Brothers Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows of Portland, the Knights of Pythias of 
Yarmouth; and he is highly esteemed for his 
many commendable qualities. 



/^^KORGE R. SKOLFIELD, a retired 
I '*) I ship-builder of Harpswell, Me., was 
bom September 20, 1809, on the 
estate where his present beautiful residence 
is situated. His parents were George and 
Lydia D. (Doyle) Skolfield, both natives of 
Harpswell. His great-grandfather Skolfield 
was born in England. Immigrating to this 
country in the vigor of young manhood, he 
settled in Harpswell, and here cleared a large 
tract of land at a time when the homes of a 
few pioneers formed the nucleus of the present 
thriving town. He was the father of Clement 
Scholfield, who was born on this homestead 
and here passed his life, prosperously engaged 
in agriculture. 



George Skolfield, son of Clement, was 
reared to farm life, but found ship-building a 
more congenial pursuit, and engaged in that 
business when a young man. He finally es- 
tablished a ship yard of his own in Brunswick, 
near the present home of his son, which is not 
far from the town line; and his fame as a reli- 
able ship-builder spread throughout the sec- 
tion. He died in his eighty-seventh year, at 
the home where his father and grandfather had 
closed their eyes forever on the scenes of earth. 
His wife was called to rest at the age of 
eighty-three. Mr. and Mrs. George Skolfield 
were esteemed members of the Congregational 
church at Brunswick. They were the parents 
of five children, three of whom are now living 
— George R., the subject of this sketch; Lin- 
coln ; and Samuel. 

George R. Skolfield entered his father's 
ship yard when eighteen years of age, and 
learned the ship-builder's trade according to 
what were then the latest and most approved 
methods. After the death of his father he 
and his brothers, Lincoln and Samuel, carried 
on a successful business until 1884. They 
built wooden ships altogether, and in their 
particular line were very successful, acquiring 
a wide reputation as first-class ship-builders. 
When iron vessels came into vogue they closed 
up their business. Mr. Skolfield has built a 
great many ships, including some of seventeen 
hundred tons; and, with his brothers, he owns 
at present some fine vessels which are in active 
service, plying between different ports. lie 
now manages a small farm, which is part of 
the old family homestead; and his residence 
is one of the finest in the county, his long ex- 
perience in building beautiful vessels culti- 
vating a natural taste for architecture and 
giving him ideas as unique as they are beauti- 
ful when [Hit into practical expression in a 
dwelling-house. His ability as a business 
man is universally recognized, and he has 
been a Director of the Pejapscot and Union 
Banks in Brunswick for several years. 

At about twenty-one years of age Mr. Skol- 
field was united in marriage with Eliza Reed, 
a native of Topsham, Me., who died at the age 
of twenty. She left one child, Ann Eliza, 
who became the wife of Captain Paul C. Mer- 
riman, of Brunswick, who died in 1895. Her 



\>> 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



daughter, Eliza, married Willis Chermery, of 
Portland. In 1848 Mr. Skolfield married 
Hannah F. Milliken. Of this union five chil- 
dren were born — Susan (deceased) was the 
wife of Isaac Merriman, a merchant of Harps- 
well ; Lydia, wife of Captain Dunning, is with 
her parents, her husband being at sea; John 
T. is a wholesale grocer in Portland; Daniel 
T. is with his father. Mr. Skolfield's eldest 
son, John T. , married Josephine Pennell, of 
Portland, and has two daughters, Frances and 
Lydia. Daniel T. Skolfield married Carrie 
Richardson, of Brunswick. 

Mr. Skolfield cast his first vote in the ranks 
of the Whig party, but is now a Democrat. 
Though not an aspirant for office, he served 
for some time as Selectman of Harpswell and 
represented the district in the legislature in 
[884. He attends and helps to support the 
Congregational church, the church of his 
parents, and is most highly esteemed in the 
parish. A man of rare intelligence, quick 
wit, and jovial disposition, Mr. Skolfield is 
very popular in Harpswell and Brunswick; 
and the name of his friends is legion. 



■OHN STEVENS, one of the noble army 
of patriots who laid down their lives 
for the preservation of the Union, was 
a native of Bridgton, Cumberland 
County, Me., having been born here, July 3, 
1832. His parents, Ransom and Betsey (Ab- 
bott) Stevens, were prosperous farmers of this 
place; and they reared ten children, the names 
of whom were respectively: Emeline, Rufus, 
Elizabeth, William, Hannah, John, Ransom, 
Alvin, and Harriet, and one son that died in 
infancy. Of this large family but two are 
now living — Elizabeth, wife of Joel Bailey; 
and Harriet, widow of William Mann. Four 
of the sons, Rufus, William, John, and Ran- 
som, served in the late Civil War. Ransom 
was at the battle of Cain River Crossing, 
where he received wounds that caused his 
death three days later. William was captured 
in the battle of Sabine Cross-roads and Pleas- 
ant Hill, and confined for nine months and 
thirteen days in Tyler Prison, Texas. 

John Stevens, our special subject, in early 
manhood left the home farm to learn the brick- 



maker's trade, which he followed for several 
years. In 1858 he purchased the farm now 
owned ami occupied by his widow, and here 
engaged in agricultural pursuits until after 
the second call for volunteers. Then, en- 
thused by patriotic zeal, he enlisted December 
29, 1863, in Company F, Thirtieth Maine 
Regiment of Veteran Infantry, going to the 
front as a private. With his regiment he went 
to New Orleans, afterward taking part in the 
Red River expedition under General Banks, 
besides which he was in other important 
engagements, among them the battle of Sabine 
Cross-roads. He was subsecpiently taken sick 
and sent to Jarvis General Hospital at Balti- 
more, Md., where he died, August 24, 1S64, 
from disease contracted from the exposure and 
hardships incidental to army life. His re- 
mains were brought home and carefully in- 
terred by loving hands in the family burial lot 
in the Hio Cemetery. 

Mrs. Stevens, whose maiden name was Mary 
J. Libby, was born March 6, 1833, in the town 
of Auburn, Me., being a daughter of Jonathan 
and Mary (Jordan) Libby. Her union with 
John Stevens was celebrated November 3, 
1853. Of the five children born to her and 
her husband, one, Joseph A., died in infancy. 
The record of the others is thus given : Morrill 
A. is a farmer in this town; George B. resides 
in Reading, Mass. ; Mary E. is the wife of 
Irving Hibbard, and resides with her mother, 
Mr. Hibbard having the care of the home 
farm; and Ella M. married Rollo H. Reid, a 
printer of Minneapolis, Minn. 



RANK MITCHELL, M.D., a skilled 
and popular physician of Bridgton, was 
born August 19, 1847, in the town of 
Kennebunk, York County, Me., where his 
father, the Rev. John Mitchell, then had 
charge of a pastorate. The father was born 
in the town of Newfield, being there reared on 
a farm, on which he remained until attaining 
his majority. He then studied for the minis- 
try, and for the following six years was an 
itinerant preacher. Being then ordained, he 
subsequently had charge, in succession, of the 
Methodist churches in the towns of Kenne- 
bunk, York, Eliot, Buxton, Alfred, Wayne, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



47 



Kent's Hill, New Sharon, Readfield, Wilton, 
Strong, and Fryeburg. About ten years prior 
tu his decease lie retired from active minis- 
terial labor, settling in Kezar Falls, York 
Count)', Me., where he died in 1889. Of his 
union with Miss Elizabeth Wentworth two 
children were born — Frank, whose name ap- 
peals at the head of this sketch; and Nellie 
E., wife of Francis Redlon, an attorney. 

Dr. Mitchell entered the class of 1872, 
Bowdoin College, in which he remained till 
the year 1S71. He then went to Jacksonville, 
Fla., and began the study of medicine with 
his uncle, Dr. R D. Mitchell, remaining 
there one year. Returning North, he entered 
the Bellevue Hospital Medical College of New 
York City, and the Bellevue Hospital, staying 
there until 1874, when he received his diploma 
from the college. He commenced the prac- 
tice of his profession at North Fryeburg, this 
State, continuing there until 1881, when he 
went to New York City, where he spent the 
winter attending lectures and taking special 
studies. In the spring of 1882 Dr. Mitchell 
came to Bridgton, and has since built up an 
extensive practice here, having devoted his 
entire time, with the exception of the years 
1892 and 1893, when he was Pension Exam- 
iner at Fryeburg, to his professional duties. 
The union of Dr. Mitchell with Miss Abbie 
M. Dresser, of Lovell, Oxford County, Me., 
was celebrated in 1879; anc ' t0 h' m anc ^ n ' s 
wife one child, Everett T. Mitchell, has been 
born. In politics the Doctor is an adherent of 
the Republican party; and, socially, he is a 
member of the Masonic Order. 




AMUEL ROLFE, President of the 
Maine Savings Bank and Treasurer 
of the Portland Gaslight Company, 
who may be found for some part 
of every clay in the week at either the bank 
or the gas company's office, was born in 
Portland, June 21, 18 13, son of Benjamin and 
Susan Newman (Jacques) Rolfe, both of New- 
buryport, Mass. Benjamin Rolfe removed 
from Newburyport to Portland in 1802, and 
there engaged as a mechanic, doing an exten- 
sive business and employing several men. 
Twenty years prior to the time of his death 



he retired from business. He was the father 
of five children. 

Samuel Rolfe, the youngest and sole sur- 
vivor of his parents' children, received his ed- 
ucation in the schools of Portland. On leav- 
ing school lie engaged as clerk in a wholesale 
and retail establishment, carrying a stock of 
paints, oils, drugs, medicines, and dyestuffs, 
and conducted by Joshua Durgin. After serv- 
ing as clerk some six years, Mr. Rolfe was ad- 
mitted to partnership, the firm name becoming 
Joshua Durgin & Co. Their warehouse was 
on Middle Street until after the fire of 1866, 
and they were in business thirty years. 
Toward the end of that period Mr. Rolfe took 
full charge, and finally bought his partner's 
interest. After that he conducted the busi- 
ness for twenty years under his own name. 
He was the oldest apothecary in the city at the 
time of his retirement, having followed that 
calling for over fifty years. On that occasion 
the wholesale and retail druggists of the city 
met at his residence, and presented him with 
the handsome Rogers group entitled "The 
Charity Patient," which represents an apothe- 
cary ministering to a poor woman's sick child. 
Mr. Rolfe has for years been interested in other 
enterprises besides his regular business. He- 
was a member of the original company organ- 
ized to establish the Maine Savings Bank, 
and one of the original Trustees; and for the 
past fifteen years he has been President of the 
institution, which is the second largest in the 
State, with a capital of six million dollars. 
Of the Portland Gaslight Company Mr. Rolfe 
was for some years Director. On resigning 
that office he was elected Treasurer, a posi- 
tion which he has now held for ten years. 
For the past thirty-five years he has been 
Treasurer of the Widows' Wood Society, a 
charitable organization that furnishes wood to 
poor widows. For this purpose the society 
has a fund of fifty thousand dollars, left to it 
by legacy, ami in consequence demands a 
bond from its Treasurer of fort)- thousand 
dollars. It now supplies fuel to seven hun- 
dred and fifty indigent women. It • is one of 
the finest charitable institutions of Portland: 
and Mr. Rolfe is a zealous and conscientious 
worker in its behalf, cheerful l\ r attending to 
all the duties of his office. He is also inter- 



4§ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ested in other charitable enterprises in the 
city, and has otherwise clone much for the 
poor, by whom he is universally loved and 
respected. 

On January iS, 1839, he was married to 
Mary Fuller Wilson, who was born January 
16, 1 8 19, daughter of Eben Wilson, of Port- 
land, and became the father of five children, 
two of whom died in childhood. Of the sur- 
vivors Samuel L. is in Cleveland, Ohio; 
Charles W., a prosperous business man, lives 
in Newtonville, Mass.; and Percival Bryant 
is a resident of Portland. The mother died 
March 20, 1S82. Mr. Rolfe was a member of 
the City Council three years, but has not been 
an aspirant for political honors. He is a 
charter member of a Maine Lodge of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, having 
joined it in 1843. Of the thirty-five members 
who constituted the first Lodge he is the only 
one now living. He has held all the different 
chairs of the Lodge and of the Encampment, 
and is a member of Grand Lodge of Maine. 
Mr. Rolfe is a member of the Park Street 
Unitarian Church, to which his late wife also 
belonged; and he has not missed a service," 
sunshine or storm, for fifty years, the Sab- 
bath always finding him at the accustomed 
place of worship. 




AJOR LOMBARD, an industrious 
farmer and well-known resident of 
North Yarmouth, was born in 
Otisfield, Cumberland County, 
Me., May 10, 181 8, son of Joshua and Fanny 
(Morton) Lombard. Mr. Lombard's grand- 
father, Joshua Lombard, who served seven 
years in the Continental Army during the 
Revolutionary War, was a resident of Oxford 
County, Maine, where he followed the vocation 
of a farmer, and died at a good old age. He 
raised a family of five sons and one daughter, 
of whom Joshua, Mr. Lombard's father, was 
the eldest son. 

Joshua Lombard, second, was born in Ray- 
mond, Me. In early manhood he followed 
various occupations, working as a cooper and 
a millwright for some time, but-finally settled 
upon a farm, which he cultivated successfully 
for many years. He was a Methodist in his 



religious views and a liberal supporter of the 
church of that denomination. In politics he 
was originally a Democrat, but subsequently 
voted with the Republican party. At the ap- 
proach of old age he sold his farm, passing his 
last years with his children, and dying at the 
home of his son in North Yarmouth, at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-two. In young and 
middle life he was a man of fine physical de- 
velopment, strong and robust; and it is said 
that at one time he lifted a cannon which 
weighed nine hundred pounds. His first wife, 
Fanny Morton, who was born in Otisfield, 
became the mother of nine children, of 
whom Major, the subject of this sketch, is 
the only survivor. She died at the age of 
forty years. By his second wife he had no 
children. 

Major Lombard received his education in 
the common schools of his native town, and, 
when a young man, entered the employ of the 
Androscoggin & Kennebec Railroad Company, 
which now forms a part of the Maine Central. 
After remaining in that service for some time, 
he learned the trade of a ship carpenter, which 
he followed in Yarmouth and South Freeport, 
until obliged to relinquish it, owing to fail- 
ing health. In March, 1854, he settled upon 
the farm where he now resides. LI is home 
property consists of thirty acres; and he owns, 
besides, a farm of sixty-five acres in the same 
neighborhood, both consisting of fertile and 
productive land. LI is present easy circum- 
stances are the result of his industry and good 
management. 

Mr. .Lombard has been three times married. 
His first wife, Martha Rollins, whom he mar- 
ried in 1849, died in February, 1S52, leaving 
two sons, namely: Gilman R., who is a 
moulder by trade, and resides in Orange, 
Mass.; and Moses H., who died at the age of 
twenty-five years. On October 12, 1852, Mr. 
Lombard wedded Esther C. Wood, who died 
October 12, 18C0, leaving no children; ami 
on April 28, 1S61, he married for his third 
wife Jane Merrill. She was born in Hebron, 
Me., January 9, 1825, daughter of Jabez and 
Betsey (Mason) Merrill, her father being a na- 
tive of Hebron, and her mother of Minot, 
Me. Jabez Merrill was a shoemaker, which 
occupation he followed through life. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



19 



died at the age of eighty-four years. He and 
his wife reared ten children, five sons and 
five daughters, three of whom are living, 
namely: Jane (Mrs. Lombard); Betsey N., 
who is now Mrs. Bolster; and Franklin. 
Mrs. Lombard's parents were both members of 
the Free Will Baptist Church. Her mother 
lived to reach the age of sixty-four years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lombard have two children, as 
follows: Edwin M., who resides at home, and 
is a farmer, stone cutter, and carpenter, mar- 
ried Isabella McCullough, and they have two 
children — Major John and Ralph Edwin; 
Eudora B. is the wife of William E. Hutch- 
ins, an artist of Biddeford, Me., and has two 
children— Arthur and Ethel May. Mr. Lom- 
bard supports the Democratic party in poli- 
tics, but is an ardent believer in the temper- 
ance cause. Both he and his wife are Univer- 
salists in their religious belief. 



KERNALD J. SAWYER, the present 
popular Postmaster of Otisfield Gore, 
was born in Harrison, Me., on July 21, 
1841, being the son of David and Edna 
(Brackett) Sawyer. His father was a native 
of Otisfield, his birth taking place in the 
house now owned and occupied by our subject. 
He resided in this town until attaining his 
majority, then removed to Harrison, and set- 
tled near Bolster's Mills, being about that 
time employed on the canal from Harrison to 
Portland. In 1868 he returned to the old 
Sawyer farm, which he carried on for a time, 
afterward purchasing a place in this locality, 
where he spent his last days. His wife, who 
still resides here, is a native of Harrison, 
Me. Four children were born to them, 
namely: Fernald J.: David S., who died No- 
vember 21, i860; Hattie S. ; and Mary Lizzie, 
the two latter living at home with their 
mother. 

Fernald J. Sawyer made the best of his ad- 
vantages for attaining a common-school educa- 
tion, and remained with his parents during the 
years of his minority. In the busy season he 
assisted his father with the farm work, and 
during the winters taught school in Otisfield 
and Harrison, and also in various towns in 
Oxford County. Since boyhood he has made 



his home here on the old David Sawyer home- 
stead, the house in which he lives being 
erected about 1795. The farm contains about 
one hundred and sixty acres of well-improved 
land. Besides engaging in mixed husbandry 
Mr. Sawyer makes a specialty of dairying, 
keeping a dairy of twelve milch cows. On 
June 28, 1 87 1, Mr. Sawyer was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary E. Gilman, who was 
born in South New Market, N.H., daughter of 
Lycurgus G. and Rhoda Ann (Wiggins) Gil- 
man, both her parents being natives of that 
State. Her father, who was a machinist by 
trade, died in New Hampshire. Mr. and Mrs. 
Sawyer have had four children, only one of 
whom survives. One died in early infancy; 
Ernest F. also died in infancy, at the age of 
six months; David F. is attending school at 
Norway, where he is fitting himself for col- 
lege; and Delia M. died when but eight and 
a half years old. 

Until a few years ago Mr. Sawyer voted 
the straight Democratic ticket, but has lately 
been a Prohibition Democrat. On March 4, 
1889, a post-office was established at Otis- 
field Gore; and in September, 1890, Mr. 
Sawyer was appointed Postmaster, having 
served to the present time except during ten 
months from December 24 to October 25. 
He has also served this town acceptably as 
a member of the School Committee and as 
Supervisor of Schools. In 1876 and 1879 he 
was Selectman, and he has held other minor 
offices. He is a member of Crooked Rion 
Lodge, No. 152, A. F. & A. M., having been 
Worshipful Master three years; and he is also 
a member of the grange society of this county. 




IRAM VARNEY, for many years 
closely associated with the agricult- 
ural interests of Windham, Me., 
was a lifelong resident of the town, 
his birth occurring in 1807, and his death in 
1859. He was of pioneer stock, his grand- 
parents, Timothy and Johanna Varney, having 
removed from the town of Kittery, where they» 
were farmers, to Windham, coming here in 
the early days of its settlement. Both were 
Quakers in religious belief, and both lived to 
a good old age. They reared seven children, of 



5° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



whom Samuel, father of Hiram, was the sixth. 
Samuel Varney was born in 1768 in Kit- 
tery, now in Maine, but at that time included 
in Massachusetts, and came from there to 
Windham with his parents. He was a farmer, 
following that occupation throughout his life. 
In religion he was a Quaker, like his parents. 
1 le was married in September, 1 803, to Tamson 
Kennard, a native of Kittery; and they became 
the parents of five children, none of whom are 
now living. 

Hiram Varney was reared to the indepen- 
dent occupation of his immediate ancestors, 
and became a prosperous agriculturist He 
was an esteemed and respected citizen, and 
conscientiously adhered to the religious belief 
of the Quakers, in which he was reared. 

He married Susan, daughter of Wyer and 
Amy (Morton) Green, her father being a 
soldier in the War of 1812; and she survived 
him many years, dying, at the age of sixty- 
eight, in 1873. Their household circle was 
gradually increased by the birth of twelve 
children, five of whom are living, the follow- 
ing being recorded of them : George O. Varney, 
born in 1825, married Lucinda Young, of 
Greenville, Me., ami they have four children 
— Susan L., Mary A., Abby, and Grace; Har- 
riet, born in May, 1836, is the wife of Orrin 
Watkins, of Casco, Me., and has four children 
-Edgar M., Emma L., Ernest L., and Susan 
M.; Charlotte A., born June 2^, 1840, is the 
wife of Joseph L. Tukey, of Windham; Lydia 
A., born July 30, 1844, is the wife of Cor- 
nelius N. Morrell, of Windham, a sketch of 
whose life may be found elsewhere in this 
work: and Julia E., born in March, 1848, is 
the wile of Stephen Knight, of Windham. 




ANSON M. HART, one of the oldest 
and most prominent business men of 
Portland, was born at Portsmouth, 
N.H., September 20, 1807. I lis 
parents were Hanson M. and Abigail 
(Mitchell) Hart, the former a native of Ports- 
mouth, the latter of Kittery Point, Me. The 
elder Hanson M. Hart, who was commonly 
called Captain Halt, was actively engaged in 
the coasting trade, being proprietor ol a num- 
ber of boats, and was also head of the cus- 



tom-house for many years. He reared four 
children, namely: Henry B., who was long 
engaged in the wool and tanning business in 
Portland; Hanson M., the subject of this 
sketch; Esther P., wife of Mr. Joshua Pan- 
field, of Dover, N.H. ; and Sarah, who mar- 
ried a Mr. Charles Walker and lived in New 
York State. 

Hanson M. Hart was educated in the leading 
schools of Portsmouth, N. II., completing his 
studies under the tuition of Master Jackson, 
who was afterward a well-known teacher in 
Portland. He was then two years in the em- 
ploy of Le Favour & Pinder, who were in the 
wool and tanning business in Portsmouth; and 
at the age of seventeen he went to sea, ship- 
ping first for a cruise of three and a half years 
on a vessel bound for South American ports. 
In course of time Mr. Hart became Captain of 
a vessel ; but, as he was a home-loving man 
and the sea had no charms for him, in 1835 he 
settled in Portland, engaging in the wool and 
hide business with his brother. His establish- 
ment during all of these sixty years has been 
in the large building at the corner of Portland 
and Alder Streets, of which he is now sole- 
owner. He has been in business longer than 
any other merchant in Portland, and has had 
a wonderfully successful career, encountering 
none of the reverses or catastrophes that 
affect some time or other most business en- 
terprises, lie is also owner of a huge amount 
of real estate in the city. 

Mr. Hart was married in 1835 to Phoebe 
Hill, daughter of Elisha Hill, of Portsmouth, 
N.IL, and by her death in 1843 was left a 
widower with the following children : Ade- 
laide, now the widow of Roscoe G. Elder, who 
has one daughter and lives in Deeiing, Me. ; 
Ellen, wife of Augustus True, a prominent 
miller and dealer in flour and grain in Port- 
land; Hanson M., who served in the army and 
died a short time after his return home; and 
Abbie, wile of Cullen C. Chapman, a leading 
banker of Portland. Mr. Hart married for his 
second wife Miss Caroline Richards, who died 
in 1.S8S. By this union Mr. Hart has one 
child, a daughter, now the widow of Dr. Web- 
ster. She has a son, Hanson Hart Webster, 
who was graduated from the Portland High 
School in 1895, and has entered Bowdoin Col- 




HANSON M. HART. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



53 



lege. Mrs. Webster lives with her father, 
being mistress of his beautiful home at 308 
Spring Street. 

In polities Mr. Hart is a Republican. He 
takes an active interest in municipal affairs, 
and has served as a member of the City Council 
and as alderman. He has been a member of 
the Free Street Baptist Church since 1838. 
His long record has been an honorable one, 
ami he is justly esteemed by all who know 
him. 



7T\]j\RK WATSON, well known in the 
I \y town of Naples as a skilled and reli- 
^^is able carriage and sign painter, was 

born in Gorham, Me., February 7, 
1829, son of Captain G. C. and Lydia 
(Thompson) Watson. The family is of Scotch 
origin; and Mr. Watson's grandfather, John 
Watson, who was the first ancestor in Amer- 
ica, served as a soldier in the Revolutionary 
War. 

Captain G. C. Watson, who seems to have 
inherited his father's military instincts, dis- 
played his patriotism by serving as an officer 
in the American army (luring the War of 1812. 
He subsequently settled in Gorham, where 
he engaged in farming, and became quite a 
prominent citizen, being active in the early 
growth of the town. He was also a Captain 
in the State militia. He married Lydia 
Thompson, of Buxton; and they had a family 
of nine children, seven sons and two daugh- 
ters. Four of the sons and both the daugh- 
ters are still living. 

Clark Watson passed his boyhood in Gor- 
ham, where his opportunities for obtaining an 
education were limited to the slender advan- 
tages afforded by the district schools. He as- 
sisted in carrying on the farm until reaching 
the age of seventeen, when he went to Port- 
land, and served an apprenticeship at the 
painter's trade. His first five years as a 
journeyman were passed in Saco, Me., from 
which place he went to the State of Massachu- 
setts, where he followed his trade for a short 
time. After his marriage he settled in South 
Bridgton, Me., where he conducted a good 
business for about seven years, at the end of 
that time removing to Parsonsfield. Six years 



later he changed his residence and place of 
business to Cornish, where he remained for 
twelve years. At this period he was attracted 
toward agriculture as an occupation; and, de- 
ciding to follow his inclination, he returned to 
Bridgton, and bought a farm, which he culti- 
vated for four years. In 1888 he removed to 
Naples, where he resumed his trade, and, 
opening a shop in this town, has since devoted 
his attention to carriage and sign painting 
with satisfactory results. 

On July 27, 1856, Mr. Watson was united 
in marriage to Eliza A. Ingalls, a native of 
Bridgton and daughter of Abel and Sophia 
(March) Ingalls. She was one of a family of 
eight children, four sons and four daughters. 
Mr. and Mrs. Watson have had four children, 
namely: Abbie E. ; Fanny, who died young;. 
Edward C. ; and Seth B. 

In politics Mr. Watson supports the Demo- 
cratic party. 



DWARD TRICKEY is a well-known 
member of the agricultural class of 
Westbrook, where he owns a valu- 
able piece of farm property. He came to 
Westbrook from Cape Elizabeth, where he was 
born, May ifi, 1814, his parents, Zebulon and 
Lucy (Skillin) Trickey, being residents of 
the Cape. Mr. Trickey's grandfather lived in 
Deering, where he was well and favorably 
known. He and his wife reared a family of 
six children, none of whom survive. 

Zebulon Trickey, father of Edward, passed 
the active period of his life engaged in farm- 
ing at Cape Elizabeth. He also carried on a 
lumbering business to some extent and with 
fairly profitable results. He was a Democrat 
in politics, and served as a member of the 
Board of Selectmen, besides being Tax Col- 
lector; and he well and faithfully performed 
the duties intrusted to ' his charge. In his 
religious belief he was a Congregationalist. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Lucy 
Skillin, became the mother of seven children, 
three of whom are now living — Robert, Lucy, 
and Edward. 

Edward Trickey received his education in 
the common schools of Cape Elizabeth, and 
upon completing his studies engaged in farm- 




54 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ing with his father. He was subsequently 
associated with his father in the milk busi- 
ness, in which he continued for about twenty- 
five years. In i860 he bought his brother's 
share in a farm of one hundred acres situated 
in Westbrook, and he has since resided here. 
His principal crop is hay, of which he raises 
about forty tons annually; and he usually 
keeps about eight head of cattle. He has. ex- 
pended much money in improving his farm, 
having built a new residence and barn, the 
last-named building being sixty-five by forty- 
two feet and capable of holding sixty tons of 
hay. These expenses, besides others, have 
been met by the income derived from the cul- 
tivation of his property. 

Mr. Trickey married Martha E. Bond, 
daughter of Amer Bond, of Indiana, but has 
no children. He supports the Democratic 
party in politics, and in his religious views 
he is a Universalist. 




ARON CLEAVES, a native and resi- 
dent of Chebeaguc Island, was horn 
January 2, 1843, being a son of 
Aaron, Sr., and Eliza (Hamilton) 
Cleaves. His grandfather, Ebenezcr Cleaves, 
who carried on general farming on this island 
for many years, here married Miss Jane 
Cleaves, the descendant of another family; and 
they reared a family of ten children, Aaron, 
Sr., being the fourth son in order of birth. 

Aaron Cleaves, Sr., was born on Cousins 
Island in 1809. He was a natural mechanic, 
and much of his life worked along the coast, 
engaged in building sea walls and break- 
waters. He assisted in building Brown's 
Wharf at Portland, and the Boston & Maine 
Wharf, formerly called Smith's Wharf, and 
continued to work at his trade until his death, 
June 20, 1876. His wife, Eliza Hamilton, a 
daughter of James Hamilton, a resident of the 
island, bore him seven children, of whom 
three are now living, namely: Aaron; Mary 
E., born January 30, 1845, who is the widow 
of Lewis W. Sylvester, and has four children 
— Nellie E., Herman J., Fred L., and Elvie 
C. ; and Isaac H., born April 6, 1851, who, 
like his brother Aaron, is a resident of Che- 
beague Island. 



Aaron Cleaves was bred and educated on 
the island where he was born, and here started 
in life for himself a short time after attaining 
his majority. Buying an interest in a sloop, 
Mr. Cleaves transported granite to different 
places on the Maine coast. He subsequently 
engaged in his father's occupation, building 
sea walls at Rockland, and the Bar Harbor 
breakwater, his work in each place being 
thorough and durable. 

On September 24, 1865, Mr. Cleaves was 
united in marriage with Caroline L., daughter 
of Stephen Curet, of Chebeaguc Island. Of 
their union two children have been bom, 
George L. and Charles A., the birth of the 
former having occurred June 17, 1867, and of 
the latter, September 24, 1870. George L. has 
been twice married. His first wife was Alma 
A. Garrett, of Vinal Haven, Knox County, 
Me., and his second wife, Annie M., daughter 
of Isaac Strout, of Chebeaguc Island. Charles 
was married April 19, 1892, to Minnie Brown, 
of Vinal Haven. Both of the sons are mem- 
bers of the Star Hope Lodge, No. 42, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. Cleaves 
is a steadfast Republican in politics and an 
attendant of the Methodist church, of which 
Mrs. Cleaves is a member. Mr. Cleaves is 
well known in social organizations, being a 
member of Harmony Lodge, No. 19, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows of Portland; of 
Portland Encampment, No. 19, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows; and of the Golden 
Cross Banner Commandery, No. 76, of Che- 
bea&ue Island. 



TUTNAM STEVENS, general agent 
for Maine of the Massachusetts Mutual 
Life Insurance Company of Spring- 
field, Mass., whose office is at 40 Ex- 
change Street, Portland, was born in Winthrop, 
Me., November 24, 1852, son of Joseph W. 
and Mary C. (Ingalls) Stevens. His paternal 
grandfather, Benjamin Stevens, who was a 
prominent farmer and extensive fruit grower, 
came originally from Ipswich, Mass., while 
yet a young man, and settled in Winthrop, 
Kennebec County, where he died in 1875, 
aged about eighty years. Joseph W. Stevens, 
who was born in Winthrop, August 15, 1826, 



P.IOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



55 



worked for many years as a carpenter and 
builder, and died May 23, 1889. His wife, 
Mary, horn in Madison, Me., April 6, 1825, a 
daughter of John Ingalls, of that place, is yet 
living, residing with her son, the subject of 
this sketch. She had two other children, 
namely: Bettie M., who married H. C. 
Dexter; and Mary L., who married A. E. 
Hutchins. 

J. Putnam Stevens received a good educa- 
tion, having studied in the public schools of 
his native town, at Wilton Academy, and at 
Kent's Hill Seminary, known as the Maine 
Wesleyan Seminary. He taught school for a 
while, and subsequently engaged as a travel- 
ling salesman. This latter occupation he fol- 
lowed until ten years ago, when he took up 
the insurance business, entering the employ 
of the Maine Benefit Association of Auburn. 
He transacted more business for this company 
in a given time than any man they ever had in 
the field. In 1887 he was offered and ac- 
cepted the management of the Massachusetts 
Mutual for the State of Maine. This company 
had been represented in the State for thirty 
years when Mr. Stevens became manager, and 
had on its books a premium collection of ten 
thousand dollars. In 1894, at the end of the 
seventh year of his management, the amount 
of premiums collected for that year footed 
nearly fifty thousand dollars. Mr. Stevens is 
an alert and persevering business man, who 
knows how to make the most of an opportu- 
nity and to win success in the face of diffi- 
culty. 

In 1879, January I, Mr. Stevens was mar- 
ried to Miss Julia A. Wing, of Wayne, Me., 
whose parents died when she was only two 
years of age. Their union has been favored 
by the birth of one son, Carl P., who is now 
twelve years of age. In politics Mr. Stevens is 
a Republican. He has held various offices dur- 
ing his lifetime, serving from 1875 to 1878 
as Selectman of Wayne, and acting for some 
time as superintendent of the School Commit- 
tee of that town. He is well advanced in Ma- 
sonry, belonging to Asylum Lodge, No. 133, 
of Wayne; Greenleaf Chapter, No. 13, of 
Portland; Portland Council, No. 1; St. Al- 
bans Commandery, No. 8; Maine Consistory, 
A. A. S. S. ; and he is also a member of the 



Mystic Shrine. He belongs to Samoset 
Tribe of Red Men and to Portland Colony of 
Pilgrim Fathers. Mr. and Mrs. Stevens are 
attendants of the Congress Square Universalist 
Church. They have a pretty home at 1 Sher- 
man Street, Portland. 




jICHARD MAYBERRY, who has 

spent his long and prosperous life of 
more than fourscore years in the 
town of Windham, was born May 
19, 1S14, being a son of Josiah and Eunice 
(Miller) Mayberry, both natives of this place. 
His paternal grandfather, a brave and loyal 
soldier of the Revolution, spent his entire life 
in Windham, earning his living as a tiller of 
the soil. To him and his wife, whose maiden 
name was Jane Miller, eleven children were 
born, seven boys and four girls, Josiah being 
the sixth son. 

Josiah Mayberry was born February 27, 
1783, and was here bred to farming pursuits, 
which he followed through life, becoming the 
owner of a farm of one hundred acres, a large 
portion of which he placed under cultivation. 
He was an industrious, hard-laboring man, 
and rounded out a long life, living until June, 
1870. He was twice married. On October 
25, 1806, he was united to Eunice Miller, who 
died December 26, 1S15, leaving five chil- 
dren, of whom Richard is the only one now 
living. Plis second wife, Eliza Swett, of 
Gorham, bore him seven children, four of 
whom are living, namely: Joshua; Stephen; 
Sarah J., wife of David R. Hawkes; and Ed- 
mund D. The father was a Democrat in poli- 
tics and an attendant of the Baptist church. 

Richard Mayberry was less than two years 
old when his mother died. After leaving the 
district school, which he attended regularly 
during his boyhood, he worked out as a farm 
laborer for several years. In 1839 he bought 
twenty-five acres, which are now included in 
his present homestead property. By dint of 
persevering energy and thrift he succeeded in 
his occupation, from time to time buying more 
land, his estate now containing one hundred 
acres of good land, about one-half of which is 
under tillage. As a citizen Mr. Mayberry 
has always been held in high regard, being 



5 6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



prominent and influential in local affairs; and 
in 1873 he represented his native town in the 
State legislature, being elected on the Repub- 
lican ticket, which he has always conscien- 
tiously supported. In religion he is liberal, 
believing that "righteousness and character 
are keys to heaven's prize." 

On March 30, 1841, Mr. Mayberry married 
his cousin, Mary J-, daughter of Thomas May- 
berry, of Windham, and unto them four chil- 
dren have been born, as follows: Almeda 
Ellen Mayberry was born December 14, 1848; 
Mrs. Mary Abbie Mayberry, born August 30, 
1S54, has two children — Mabel May and 
Richard Leroy ; Frank N., born October 22, 
1858, married Clara, daughter of Isaiah Allen, 
of this town, and has two children — Inez F. 
and Mildred E. ; and Frederick Eugene was 
born April 27, 1865. 



ir\R. JOHN T. PALMER, one of the 
I I rising young physicians of Portland, 

|>5y having his home and office at 306 

Congress Street, is a native of 
this city, born March 4, 1858. His father, 
also John T. Palmer, was born in Portland, 
England, where his parents were accidentally 
killed when he was but four years old. When 
eight years of age, John T. Palmer, Sr., came 
to this country, and to Portland when a young 
man. He has been a sea captain for more 
than thirty years. He used to sail from this 
port in charge of some one of its larger 
vessels, but for the past eight years he has 
sailed from New York. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Martha Steadman, has borne 
him four children. 

Dr. Palmer acquired the rudiments of his 
education in the schools of this city, and was 
afterward fitted for college at a private school. 
He began the study of medicine with Dr. S. E. 
Sylvester, of Portland, subsequently taking 
his lecture course at the Hahnemann College 
in Chicago, from which he was prepared for 
graduation in 1879; but, not being old enough, 
he took a second course, and received his 
diploma in 18S0. In the latter year the Doc- 
tor took a number of special courses, including 
a study of the diseases of the eye and ear, and 
of obstetrics, they being practically post-grad- 



uate courses. On March 3 of the year of his 
graduation Dr. Palmer entered upon the prac- 
tice of his profession in this city, locating at 
No. 294 Congress Street, where he lived for 
thirteen years. He then bought his present 
property, which has been occupied by physi- 
cians since 1866. By his knowledge and skill 
he has won the confidence of the community, 
and has built up a large and lucrative practice. 

The Doctor is prominently connected with 
many social, fraternal, and beneficiary organi- 
zations, being an active worker in each. 
He is a member of the Ancient Landmark 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; of Hacldattah Lodge, 
No. 117, and Una Encampment, Independent 
Order of Odd l 7 ellows; of Canton Ridgely; 
of Longfellow Lodge, Knights of Pythias: 
of the New England Order of Protection; of 
the Royal Society of Goodfellows, of which 
he has been Treasurer for many years; and of 
the Order of United Friends. He was one of 
the founders and a charter member of Had- 
dattah Lodge, and a founder of Una Encamp- 
ment, of which he has since been agent. He 
has held the office of Captain or Assistant 
Surgeon of Patriarch Militant, First Regiment 
of Maine, and is a member of the Grand 
Lodge, being Chairman of the Committee on 
Returns. The Doctor was, likewise, one of 
the charter members of Longfellow Lodge. 
He is popular with all people, serving the 
different societies with universal satisfaction, 
and is now the examining physician of thir- 
teen different insurance organizations. 

Dr. Palmer was united in marriage October 
18, 1882, with Miss Anna M. Rooney, of 
this city, their union having been blessed 
by the birth of two children — Edwin L. and 
Lizzie M. 




ETH L. PLUMMER, an active and 
useful member of the farming com- 
munity of Scarboro, this county, is 
a native-born citizen, the date ol 
his birth being March 30, 1835. His grand- 
father, Abram Plummer, was also born in 
Cumberland County, on Richmond's Island, 
but subsequently removed to Cape Elizabeth, 
where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits 
during his remaining years. He there mar- 





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1 


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pw 1 I V • &> 




lu\ x i W 

pi I L m 



BENJAMIN F. PRITCHARD. 



IilOCRAI'IIICAL REV I FAY 



59 



ried Martha Libby, who bore him six sons, 
the second and third being twins: and of these 
David was the father of Seth L. 

David Plummer was reared and educated in 
Cape Elizabeth. He became a farmer, anil 
also followed the trade of house carpenter, and 
was an esteemed and law-abiding citizen. 
Religiously, he was a member of the Orthodox 
church, and in politics supported the Demo- 
cratic party. He married Mary A. Moody, 
whose mother lived to be one hundred and 
four years old, and she bore him three chil- 
dren — Seth L., the special subject of this 
sketch; David O. ; and one child that died in 
infancy. 

David O. Plummer, who is a mason by 
trade and a well-known farmer of Scarboro, 
was born May 20, 1838. He has been three 
times married. His first wife, formerly 
Nellie Hunnewell, died, leaving one child, 
Nellie. He afterward married Miss Lizzie 
Hunnewell, a sister of his first wife; and of 
their union a daughter was born — Lizzie. To 
him and his present wife, whose maiden name 
was Alice A. Stone, two children have been 
born — Walter E. and Susan Josephine. 

Seth L. Plummer obtained a practical edu- 
cation in the district schools of the Cape, 
where he spent his early life. Succeeding to 
the occupation of his father and grandfather, 
Mr. Plummer has been prospered in his work, 
being now the owner of a well-appointed and 
finely improved farm of eighty acres, fifty of 
which are under excellent cultivation. In 
addition to his agricultural labors, he has been 
actively engaged in carriage making and re- 
pairing, having picked up. the trade himself, 
his natural mechanical ability and ingenuity 
making him highly successful in this work. 
Mr. Plummer, who is now a member of the 
School Committee and the Town Agent, 
served as one of the Selectmen of Scarboro in 
[886, 18S7, 1S88, 1890, and 1891, being 
Chairman of the Board the last two years. 
He was also a member of the superintending 
School Committee in Cape Iilizabeth for a 
number of terms. On June 26, 1867, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Susan E. Stone, 
a native of Cape Elizabeth and a daughter of 
John Stone. In politics Mr. Plummer is an 
earnest advocate of the principles of the Dem- 



ocratic party, and in religion his views are 
broad and liberal. 




EV. BENJAMIN F. PRITCHAKD, 

for many years one of the most popu- 
lar and successful preachers of the 
Free-will Baptist denomination, 
has in recent years been engaged in the real 
estate and brokerage business, but in the mean 
time has also done a good deal of evangelistic 
work. A native of Blackstone, Mass., he was 
born August 26, 1S33, son of Benjamin and 
Lillas (Bowen) Prichard (name formerly 
spelled without the "t" ). 1 1 is father was born 
in 1802 in Marblehcad, Mass., and attained 
the venerable age of eighty-five years, being 
long employed as an overseer in a cotton-mill. 
The mother was a native of the town of 
Foster, R.I. ; and she also saw many days on 
earth, dying in 1891, aged eighty-nine years. 
They were the parents of four children, 
namely: Mary Ann, born in 1829; Mary 
Eliza, born March 12, 1831; Benjamin P.; 
and James W., born September 20, 1836. 

Benjamin F. Pritchard acquired his early 
education in the schools of Providence, R.I., 
and vicinity, being graduated from the North 
Providence High School. lie then began his 
active career as a teacher in the schools of 
South Killingly, Conn., where he was en- 
gaged in the winter of 1857 and 1858. There 
in the spring of the latter year, on March [4, 
he married one of his pupils, Celie L., daugh- 
ter of Jesse and Martha (Gibson) Handall. 
The only child of this union was a daughter, 
Harriet Eudora, born December 24, 1858, 
who became the wife of I{rncst W. Arnold, 
of Providence, R.I., and is now well known in 
the literary world as a writer of merit, many 
of her poems being published in the Portland 
Transcript and other leading journals. 

After his marriage Mr. Pritchard continued 
teaching, being in Greenwich, R.I., for nearly 
four years; and while there he was superin- 
tendent of the schools of the town, and also 
served as Justice of the Peace, his commission 
being signed by William Sprague, Rhode 
Island's war governor. During all this time 
Mr. Pritchard was studying for the ministry, 
and had become a licensed preacher. In May, 



6o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



iSr>2, he received a call to become pastor of 
the church at Farnumsville, Grafton, Mass., 
being ordained to the ministry in the follow- 
ing month, in the Roger Williams Free 
Baptist Church at Providence. He met with 
great success in his pastoral work, remaining 
at Farnumsville about three years, when, on 
account of his wife's failing health, he left 
that locality, by the advice of her physician 
(Dining to Maine. Here Mr. Pritchard ac- 
cepted a call to the churches of Unity and 
Thorndike in Waldo County. In 1866 he 
made another change, going to Pittsfield, 
N.H., where he had charge of the Free 
Baptist Church for about a year. Mrs. 
Pritchard's health being still in a precarious 
condition, he sought the seashore, taking 
miller his pastoral charge the Free Baptist 
Church of Cape Elizabeth, where he resided 
twelve years, preaching the first half of the 
time there, and the other six years at the Bay 
Side Parish. While living at Cape Elizabeth, 
Mr. Pritchard was unanimously elected Town 
Clerk. For three years he was a member of 
the School Board, and lor six years was Crier 
of the Superior Court of Cumberland County 
in Portland. 

In 1879 Mr. Pritchard removed to this city, 
where he embarked in his present business, 
which he has since prosperously carried on. 
During the years of his pastorates he officiated 
at hundreds of baptisms, marriages, and fu- 
nerals, often going long distances in order to 
do so; and he was selected to preach the 
sermon at almost all of the quarterly and 
yearly meetings of his denomination that he 
attended. He is connected by membership 
with many social organizations, belonging to 
the Masons; the Knights of Pythias; the Sons 
of America; the White Men; the Guards of 
Liberty; the Grand Division, Sons of Tem- 
perance; and the Grand Lodge of Independent 
Order of Good Templars. 

The death of his first wife, Mrs. Celie H. 
Pritchard, occurred on July 14, 1883, after his 
removal to Portland, her body being taken to 
South Killingly, Conn., and interred in the 
family burying-ground. On November 12, 
1S85, Mr. Pritchard was again married to 
Alice C, daughter of Charles and Catherine 
(Wadleigh) Howe, of Monticello, Aroostook 



County. Their only child, Harold Kenneth 
Howe Pritchard, was born January 26, 1S88, 
and is the life of their pleasant home at 75 
Quebec Street. Mr. Pritchard has been very 
successful both as a preacher and as a business 
man, being genial, warm-hearted, and sympa- 
thetic, and possessing good executive ability. 
He is largely self-educated, reading intelli- 
gently and retaining all important facts. He 
is a great lover of good poetry, which he 
quotes fluently and with excellent effect. 




ILLIAM H. BRIGHAM, a thor- 
ough-going and systematic farmer, 
was born in Bridgton on the home- 
stead where he now resides, March 6, 1823, 
this likewise being the birthplace of his 
father, Daniel Brigham, Jr., whose birth oc- 
curred in 1794. The original owner of the 
farm was the grandfather, Daniel Brigham, 
Sr., who was a pioneer of Cumberland County 
and one of the very first settlers of Bridgton. 
He erected his log cabin in the midst of 
the wilderness, and established a comfortable 
homestead. Here Daniel Brigham, Jr., his 
son and successor, carried on general farming, 
being also engaged a part of his time in black- 
smithing, having a shop on the farm. He 
was a soldier in the War of 1812, and served 
with bravery until its close. He attained a 
good age, living until August I, 1862. To 
him and his wife, whose maiden name was 
Sophronia Emerson, nine children were born: 
namely, William II., Silas, Edward, Sarah, 
Ruth, Otis, Seth, Roxanna, and Eliza. 

William II. Brigham received a practical 
common-school education, remaining with his 
parents until nineteen years old. He then 
started out for himself, going to Marlboro, 
Mass., where he was employed in agricultural 
work for seven years. Returning to this 
State, Mr. Brigham invested his hard-earned 
money in land, buying a farm in the town of 
Naples, where he lived eleven years. Dispos- 
ing of that property, he came back to his 
childhood home, of which, his father being in 
ill health, he assumed the charge, afterward 
purchasing the interest of the other heirs. 
The homestead contains one hundred and eigh- 
teen acres of land, most of which is under cul- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



6 1 



tivation; and here Mr. Brigham carries on 
general tanning with profitable results, hav- 
ing comfortable and convenient farm build- 
ings and all the necessary machinery for 
practical work. In politics he sustains the 
principles of the Democratic party. Roth he 
and his wife are true-hearted, Christian people, 
libera] in their religious views and worthy 
members of the Universalis! church. 

Mr. Brigham was married September 19, 
1849, to Miss Lydia Stuart, of Harrison, she 
being a daughter of Joseph and Nancy (Lom- 
bard) Stuart, who reared thirteen children; 
namely, Fanny, Samuel, Joshua, Abigail, 
Esther, George, Achsah, Emily, Calista, 
Frank (deceased), Lydia, Amos, and Johanna. 
All of these grew to adult life, and five daugh- 
ters and two sons are now living. Mr. and 
Mrs. Brigham have had no children. 



ERRY JACKSON OSBORNE, a ven- 
erable and honored citizen of Gorham, 
Cumberland County, is a native of New 
Hampshire, having been born in the 
town of Lee, that State, January 3, 181 5. 
His parents were the Rev. John B. and Mary 
(Frost) Osborne, both natives of New Castle, 
N.H.; and he is of English extraction, his 
grandfather, George J. Osborne, having been 
the emigrant ancestor. The last named came 
from England directly to Portsmouth, N. II., 
where he afterward resided until his death at 
a ripe old age. He was a school teacher by 
occupation. Further information relating to 
Mr. Osborne's ancestry is contained in the 
sketch of Woodbridge G. Osborne, his 
nephew. 

The subject of this brief sketch obtained 
his education among the hillside schools of 
his native State. From his earliest recollec- 
tion he has been engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits, finding the occupation pleasant and 
profitable. He owns a valuable timber farm 
in the town of Gorham, where he has resided 
for many years, being numbered among the 
well-to-do farmers of this part of the county. 

Mr. Osborne was married March 1, 1852, 
to Elizabeth Leavis Martin, daughter of Will- 
iam and Sophia (Leavis) Martin, of Portland. 
Mrs. Osborne was born in Portland, November 



27, 1822. She and her husband have three 
children living, the following being their 
record: Mary E., born May 13, 1853, is the 
wife of Clinton A. Moulton, of Buxton, and 
the mother of three children — Millie <>, 
Margie, and Florence; Charles S., born June 
2, 1857, lives on the old homestead; William 
II., born August 5, 1859, married Georgie 
Libby, of Gorham, who died leaving one son, 
Frank M., born March 27, 1882. In politics 
Mr. Osborne affiliates with the Democratic 
party, being one of its stanchest supporters; 
and his wife is a member of the Baptist 
Church of Limintrton. 



OSEPH H. SHORT, member of the 
firm of Milliken, Cousins & Short, 
wholesale dry-goods dealers of Port- 
land, was born in this city, August 1 1, 
1847, son of John H. and Sarah A. (Pettis) 
Short. His father, who was a native of Port- 
land, Me., was born in 18 10, and died in 
1 86 1 ; and his mother, who was born in 1S15, 
survived her husband seventeen years, dying 
in 187S. After attending the common schools 
our subject completed a course of study at 
Nesmith's Academy. He entered the employ 
of Storer & Cutler while still a boy, and was 
eventually promoted to a clerkship, which he 
held for several years. In 1865 the style of 
the firm was changed to Deering, Milliken 
& Co., and a few years later Mr. Short became 
a partner. Another change made the name of 
the company W. H. Milliken & Co., and in 
1890 it became Milliken, Cousins & Short. 
This establishment is one of the largest in 
Maine, and has an extensive trade all through 
the Eastern States and New York. It occu- 
pies the building at 164-166 Middle Street, 
Portland, and is five stories high and fifty by 
one hundred and seventy-five feet in dimen- 
sions. The firm has a number of storehouses, 
their business including the agency for several 
mills. Mr. Short has been connected with 
the enterprise since 1862, and a large share of 
its prosperity is due to his ability and fore- 
sight. 

Mr. Short was married in 1869 to Harriet 
Leavitt, daughter of Samuel R. and Susan M. 
(Sawyer) Leavitt, who for more than a quarter 



62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of a century has been a constant and sympa- 
thizing helpmeet. Politically, Mr. Short 
favors the Republican party. He is affiliated 
with several fraternal organizations, belonging 
to Ancient Landmark Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
Greenleaf Chapter and Portland Commandery; 
also to Unity Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd bellows: to the Cumberland Club; and 
to Bramhall League. He is active in church 
work, being connected with St. Stephen's 
Church, in which he is a Warden, and of 
which his wife is a member. Mr. and Mrs. 
Snort have a pleasant home at 452 Cumber- 
land Street. 




jHARLES PEABBLES, a prominent, 
progressive, and prosperous agricult- 
(s _, urist of Cape Elizabeth, is a typical 
representative of the native-born 
citizens of the Cape, the date of his birth 
being August 24, 1833. His grandfather, 
Charles Peabbles, for whom he was named, 
was a native, and the descendant of one of the 
old settlers, of the Cape. He was one of the 
early farmers of the place, and, in addition to 
carrying on mixed husbandry, was profitably 
engaged as a miller, having a grist-mill on 
bis farm, the neighbors all bringing their corn 
to him to be ground. His wife, Annie Mitch- 
ell, was a daughter of a pioneer settler, and 
a most faithful helpmeet. Seven of their 
children grew to adult life, John, Charles's 
father, being the fourth child. Both of the 
grandparents lived to venerable ages, the 
grandfather dying at the age of ninety-three 
years. 

John Peabbles was born on the old home- 
stead, February 19, 1804, and during his years 
of activity was engaged in general farming. 
He married June 13, 1828, Hannah W. 
Jordan, who became the mother of six chil- 
dren, of whom the following five are living, 
residents of this place: William W., Charles, 
M. J., John A., and Hannah H. 

Charles Peabbles was reared on the home 
farm, and attended the district school, becom- 
ing; as familiar with the agricultural arts as 
with his books. Succeeding to the occupation 
in which he was reared, Mr. Peabbles is now 
numbered among the foremost farmers of this 



vicinity and one of the most esteemed resi- 
dents of the Cape, which has always been his 
home. A man of enterprise and intelligence, 
he has been an important factor in the manage- 
ment of town affairs, having in i860, 1863, 
and again in 1895, been elected to the office 
of Selectman. Politically, in national affairs 
he is a Democrat. Religiously, he is very 
liberal in his interpretation of the Bible, and 
is an attendant of the Methodist church. 

One of the most important events in his 
career was his marriage with Sarah M., 
daughter of Dominicus Johnson, the descend- 
ant of a well-known family of Cape Elizabeth, 
their union having been celebrated July 4, 
1856. They have one son and two daughters 
living, namely: Elizabeth Florence, born 
September 9, 1857, who is the wife of Charles 
H. Chace, of Portland; Charles II. A., born 
August 21, 1870, who resides on the home- 
stead; ami Annie M., born July 1, 1S73, also 
at home. 




RASTUS EUGENE HOLT, M.D., a 
Portland physician of the highest stand- 
ing, and whose work in the interest 
of medical science in Maine marks an epoch 
in the history of the State, was born in Peru, 
Me., June 1, 1849, son of Erastus and Lu- 
anda (Packard) Holt. Erastus Holt, the 
father, who was born in Weld, Franklin 
County, Me., moved to Peru shortly after his 
marriage. He was a carpenter by trade, and 
was also a farmer. In 1859 he went to Califor- 
nia, infected with the gold fever, but returned 
after a stay of two years, locating at Canton, 
Oxford County, where he still lives. In his 
younger days lie took a prominent part in town 
affairs; and at the time of the Madawaska 
War he shouldered his musket, and took an 
active part in the contest. His wife, who 
was a native of Peru, died in 1861, leaving a 
son, the subject of this article, who was then 
but twelve years old. 

Erastus Eugene Holt, M.D., attended the 
common schools of Peru and Canton, graduat- 
ing from the high school in the latter town. 
He taught for a while, and then attended 
school at Hebron Academy, Westbrook and 
Gorham Seminaries, teaching penmanship 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



- ■: 



while pursuing his studies. Subsequently 
he was elected 1'rincipal of the City Reform 
School of Boston, a position of great responsi- 
bility, which he filled ably and well. lie 
prepared for college, but, being obliged to 
educate himself, concluded to spend all of 
his time in the study of medicine. He 
graduated from the Medical School of Maine 
in 1874. Continuing his studies, he entered 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, the 
medical department of Columbia College, 
New York City, and received his ad eiuidein 
diploma from that institution in 1875. Soon 
after he was elected Demonstrator of Anatomy 
in the Medical School of Maine, and served 
two years. Me was the first regularly ap- 
pointed House Surgeon of the Maine General 
Hospital, in which capacity he served one 
year. Dr. Holt's specialty is ophthalmology 
and otology. To perfect himself in these 
branches of medical science, he studied in 
Boston, New York, and in Europe. While 
so engaged in London, he took part in the 
Seventh International Medical Congress, held 
in 1 88 1 . He has been a pioneer in the 
treatment of the eye and ear in Maine, and 
by great personal effort founded and carried 
forward to completion one of the noblest 
charities of the State — the Maine Eye and 
Ear Infirmary, which is now one of the most 
prominent institutions within its borders. 
Dr. Holt is at the head of the management of 
the infirmary, an office which devolves upon 
him the weight of a great responsibility. The 
arduous and important work performed by him 
in this undertaking is recognized by all, ami 
has placed him in the front rank of Maine's 
noblest benefactors. He has also founded 
some important .medical associations. Recog- 
nising the benefit of the union and comparison 
of medical opinions and methods, he origi- 
nated the Portland Medical Club in 1876 and 
the Maine Academy of Medicine and Science 
in. 1894. The academy meets regularly on 
the second Monday evening from November 
to April, and numbers among its members the 
most eminent physicians and laymen of the 
State. Dr. Holt belongs to many prominent 
medical societies, among which arc the Maine 
Medical Association, the American Ophthal- 
mological and Otological Societies, the New 



England Ophthalmological Society, the Con- 
gress of American Physicians and Surgeons, 
and the American Medical Association, lie- 
has written many medical papers, which have 
been broadly published in the transactions of 
these societies and other journals. He is now 
editor and publisher of a Journal of Medicine 
and Science, the official organ of the Maine 
Academy of Medicine and Science, which lie 
also founded, and which is issued on the In 1 
of each month. This brief synopsis oi hi. 
Holt's career shows him to be a man of re- 
markable genius, having at his command an 
unusual power of accomplishment. Unaided, 
he has won his way step by step to fame and 
fortune, surmounting obstacles that would 
have daunted the heart of one less strong in 
all that makes a true and noble man. 

Dr. Holt was married in October, 1876, to 
Miss Mary Brooks, daughter of Benjamin B. 
Dyer, of Cape Elizabeth, and the following 
children have blessed their union: L. Mary- 
Belle, Clarence B., Roscoe D. T. , Erastus 
Eugene, Jr., Dorothy, and Benjamin Dyer. 
In politics Dr. Holt is a Republican. In re- 
ligion he holds liberal views. He and his 
family reside in their beautiful home, 723 
Congress Street. 




RIN B. HIBBARD, who is closely 
identified with the agricultural and in- 
dustrial interests of Bridgton, is the 
owner of one of the most comfortable 
homesteads to be found in this locality. His 
farm contains one hundred and forty-one acres 
of land, all well improved and under excel lent 
tillage, with a substantial residence, a good 
barn, and all the necessary out-buildings foj 
storing crops and sheltering stock. Mr. Hib- 
bard is a native of Milan, N. II., where his 
birth occurred, April 27, 1830, his parents 
being Benjamin and Hannah Hibbard. lie 
was but eleven months old when he was 
brought to this State, becoming then an in- 
mate of his uncle's household, and residing 
with him until fourteen years of age. Having 
concluded his studies in the district school, 
the young lad then came to Bridgton, where lie 
worked at farming and stone cutting lor 
several years. In July, 18G2, he enlisted in 



I'l 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Company I, Eleventh Maine Volunteer In- 
fantry, being mustered into service at Augusta. 
With bis brave comrades he took part in 
various battles, among them the battle of Ber- 
muda Hundred, Malvern Hill, the bombard- 
ment and siege of Fort Sumter and Charles- 
ton, and the engagements at Drewry's Bluff 
and Deep Bottom, being wounded in the latter 
fight by a shell which struck him in the ankle. 
M. was then taken to Point of Rocks, Va. , 
where he remained until the end of his term 
of enlistment, when, June 12, 1S65, he was 
honorably discharged. 

On his return to Bridgton Mr. Hibbard re- 
sumed his former occupation, continuing until 
1869, when he purchased sixty-six acres of 
land, these being included in his present farm, 
lie has since carried on mixed husbandry, en- 
gaging to some extent in lumbering and dairy- 
ing, and meeting with good success in all of 
his operations. In politics he is a sound Re- 
publican, and, though not art aspirant for offi- 
cial honors, was appointed Postmaster of West 
Bridgton, May 9, 1881. He was removed 
during President Cleveland's first term, 
reappointed on petition March 21, 1888, but 
resigned in a few months on account of ill 
health in his family. Mr. Hibbard was also 
formerly a United States mail contractor. 
Socially, he is a valued member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. Mr. Hibbard became 
a benedict in 1852, his marriage with Miss 
Elizabeth Goldthwait having been solemnized 
October 22 of that year. Mrs. Hibbard is a 
native of Bridgton, and has borne her husband 
nine children, as follows: Rebecca, Lizzie, 
Horace (deceased), Irving, Abbie, George 
(deceased), John, Wilmot, and Winnifred, the 
last of whom is also no longer living. 



(£jYOHN L. MEGQUIER, who owns and 
cultivates a productive farm in New 
Gloucester, where he is also engaged in 
the manufacture of cider, was born in 
this town, July 1, 185 I, son of General Charles 
and Louisa (Proctor) Megquier. He is of 
Scotch ancestry; and his great-grandfather, 
who settled in New Gloucester at an early 
date, was one of the seven original owners of 
this township. William Megquier, our sub- 



ject's grandfather, settled upon the farm now 
owned by his grandson in 1775, and success- 
fully followed agricultural pursuits during the 
active period of his life.- 

General Charles Megquier, father of John 
L., was born in New Gloucester in 1798. lie 
adopted agriculture as his principal occupa- 
tion, and, being a very progressive man, made 
various improvements upon his farm, which 
he cultivated with prosperous results. Besides 
being one of the foremost farmers of the 
county, he was prominent in public affairs. 
He was long a Justice of the Peace, served 
as a member of the Board of Selectmen of his 
town for a number of years, represented his 
district in the legislature, and was elected to 
the State Senate in 1854. His connection 
with the State militia, in which he held the 
rank of General, extended through a long 
period; and he was known throughout the 
State as a useful, high-minded, and worthy cit- 
izen. He died at the homestead in New 
Gloucester, March 1, 1884. His wife, Louisa 
Proctor, who was a native of this town, be- 
came the mother of two children — Charles 
William, who married Thankful Fowler, and 
is a carpenter and builder of Westboro, Mass. ; 
and John L., the subject of this sketch. Mrs. 
Charles Megquier died February 2, 1888. 

John L. Megquier obtained his education in 
the schools of his native town. At the age of 
twenty-one years he went to Lewiston, where 
for two years he was employed in a mill. He 
then returned to the homestead for the purpose 
of managing the farm, and has since resided 
here. His farm, which is one of the most 
desirable pieces of agricultural property in 
the town, is well improved: and he is prosper- 
ously engaged in general farming. He also 
operates a cider-mill, the annual product of 
which he disposes of with fair profit. In pol- 
itics he is a Democrat, and has always sup- 
ported that party since he became qualified to 
cast a vote. 

On January I, 1874, Mr. Megquier was 
united in marriage to Miss Alice J. Morse. 
Mrs. Megquier was born in New Gloucester, 
September 21, 1850, and is a daughter of 
Stephen and Johanna (Merrill) Morse. Her 
father was a native of Cumberland County, 
and a prosperous farmer, and her mother was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



65 



burn in Androscoggin County, this State. 
They resided in New Gloucester for many 
years, both dying in this town. Mr. and Mrs. 
Megquier have three children — Arville, 
Blanche, and Marcia Edna, each of whom 
has been well educated, Miss Blanche Meg- 
quier being now engaged in teaching school in 
Pownal, Me. 

Mr. Megquier is a member of Si loam 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows of 
Gray, and is one of the most respected citizens 
of his town. 




ILLARD N. FENDERSON, who 
conducts a flourishing canning busi- 
ness at Cheheague Island, Cumber- 
land County, Me., where his factory is located, 
was born February 9, 1863, at Scarboro, this 
State. His grandfather, Abial Fenderson, 
was a lifelong resident of Scarboro, where he 
owned fifty acres of land, which he improved 
and tilled; and, in addition, he worked at the 
mason's trade, being an industrious and hard- 
working man. He married Elizabeth Mar- 
shall, a native of Scarboro; and they had but 
one child, Nathan, the father of Willard N. 
Both of the grandparents lived to a good old 
age, the grandfather dying at the age of 
seventy-five, and his wife at the age of sixty 
years. He was a Democrat of the old school, 
and both were liberal in their religious views. 

Nathan Fenderson's birth occurred in Scar- 
boro, Me., in the year 1828. He learned 
from his father the trade of a mason, which he 
followed for several years. He succeeded to 
the ownership of the parental farm, which he 
managed besides practising his trade, .making 
an excellent living for himself and family, 
lie married Bethuba, daughter of Sylvester 
Tibbetts, of Newfield, Me., and of the five 
children born to them three are now living, 
namely: Liberty L. , who lives on the Scar- 
boro homestead; John, born in 1859, and 
married in 1S84 to Miss Annie Langille, of 
Nova Scotia, they having one child, Mabel; 
and Willard N. 

Willard N. Fenderson completed his school 
studies at the Scarboro High School, and after 
leaving this institution began learning the art 
of making cans. This occupation he followed 



in his native town for ten years. Deciding 
then that there would be more profit in filling 
the cans after they were made, he leased in 
1891 the land on which his factory stands 
on Cheheague Island. Fleeting his present 
plant, Mr. Fenderson has since been prosper- 
ously engaged in canning clams, clam chow- 
der, fish, apples, and other provisions suitable 
for the purpose. In the comparatively short 
time in which he has been thus occupied, he- 
has built up an extensive and lucrative trade, 
his goods being shipped to Boston, Providence, 
Chicago, and other cities. His factory has 
a capacity of one hundred bushels per clay; and 
in the busiest seasons of the year, the spring 
and fall, forty hands are kept in constant em- 
ployment. His goods, which are all labelled 
"The Chebeague Brand," are noted for their 
excellence and purity, and have gained for 
him a reputation which he endeavors to up- 
hold. 

On December 4, 1886, Mr. Fenderson mar- 
ried Mary C, daughter of Charles F. Roberts 
of Scarboro. In politics Mr. Fenderson is a 
strong Prohibitionist, and both he and his wife 
are liberal and broad in their religious views. 
Socially, he is a member of Golden Cross 
Lodge, No. 232, "Scarboro," of Dunston 
Corners, Scarboro. 




\CA^/ILLIAM F. LIBBY, a well-known 
merchant of Gorham and Postmaster 
at White Rock, was born in this 
locality, November 21, 1.S52. His paternal 
grandfather, John Libby, was a native of Scar- 
boro, where during his earlier years he was 
profitably engaged in fishing. He afterward 
bought land in Gorham, and carried on mixed 
husbandry until his death, at the age of fifty- 
two. He married Dorcas Roberts, of Scar- 
boro; and they became the parents of nine 
children, of whom the only survivor is Elmira, 
wife of Stephen Harris, of Windham, who has 
one child, Ellen. Caleb Libby, lather of 
William F., was born in Gorham, August 25, 
1812, and died in the same town, January 14, 
1876. He was an energetic, industrious man, 
whose life was devoted to farming. On No- 
vember 20, 1845, he married Betsey, daughter 
of Lemuel Rich, of Standish ; and she sur- 



66 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



vived him a brief time, passing away October 
7, 1879. Of the three children born to them, 
two are living, namely: John W. , burn March 
4, 1847; and William F. John W. married 
Mrs. Kate McBeun, ne'e McAdams, of New 
Brunswick. 

William F. Libby acquired the rudiments 
ol knowledge in the schools of Gorham, and 
for many years was a diligent worker on his 
lather's farm. In 1894, desiring to enter upon 
a mercantile career, he purchased the old and 
well-established stand of W. F. Buxton, which 
he has since conducted, having a flourishing 
Hade in groceries and other merchandise. In 
the same year Mr. Libby was appointed Post- 
master at White Rock, the duties of which 
office he performs with satisfaction to the 
townspeople. On November 25, 1874, he- 
was united in marriage with Mrs. Alta G. 
Libby, nee Brimblescom, of Lynn, Mass. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Libby are valued members 
of the Methodist church. Me is identified 
politically with the interests of the Republi- 
can party; and, socially, he is a member of 
Granite Lodge, No. 14, Independent Order of 
( )dd Fellows of Biddeford, and of the Golden 
Cross Commandery of Gorham. 




LVIN CRESSEY, who was for many- 
years a thrifty and much respected 
farmer (if Gorham, will scarcely be 
remembered by the younger genera- 
tion of this town, having passed away thirty- 
eight years ago. lie was born in Gorham, this 
county, in 1806, spent his entire life here, and 
died April 30, 1858. He was a son of Eben- 
ezer and Sarah Cressey. His father and grand- 
lather (Ebenezer, Sr.) were both natives of this 
town and farmers by occupation. He was early 
trained to farm life and labor, and pursued his 
allotted vocation with systematic industry, 
becoming in course of time one of Gorham's 
most respected and influential citizens. For 
some years before his marriage he varied his 
occupation by keeping a store in Portland. 
He was a public-spirited man, ever ready to 
give his active support to all beneficial enter- 
prises. In politics he was a steadfast Demo 
crat, consistently supporting the principles of 
that party. His wife, Sarah Flagg by maiden 



name, was a daughter of David Flagg. She- 
survived him thirty years, dying in 1888,. 
They were the parents of six children, namely : 
Eben F., who for a number of years was a 
clerk in his uncle's store at Salmon Falls, 
XII.; Fliza A.; Caroline A.; Elizabeth; 
Hattie E. ; and Martha E. All these chil- 
dren remained unmarried, and all are now 
passed away except Martha E. , who was the 
youngest. 

Martha E. Cressey, who owns and occupies 
the old homestead, acquired her education in 
the place of her nativity, where she has spent 
the larger part of her life. She has a finely 
improved and valuable farm of one hundred 
acres, all in a high state of cultivation. This 
she manages herself in a practical business- 
like manner, with profitable financial results. 
She is held in high regard throughout the com- 
munity, and is an active member of the Con- 
gregational church. 



DWARD HUSTON, proprietor of a 
well-conducted farm in West Gray, was 
born in the house he now occupies. 
May 6, 1824, a son of David and Olive (Har- 
mon) Huston. His grandfather, Stephen 
Huston, was for many years a resident of Fal- 
mouth, where he was successfully engaged in 
agriculture during the entire active period of 
his life. 

David Huston was born in Falmouth and 
early trained to agricultural pursuits. When 
a young man he went to Windham, where he- 
was engaged in fanning for some years; but, 
subsequently returning to Gray, he settled 
upon a farm in this town. Three years later 
he moved to the farm which his son Edward 
now occupies, and on which he resided until 
his death, which took place April 16, 1874. 
He was an able and industrious farmer and a 
useful citizen. His wife Olive, who was born 
in this town, became the mother of fourteen 
children, as follows: Edward, our special 
subject; Stephen, a prosperous farmer of this 
town; Augusta, widow of John Crockett, who 
resides in Portland; Hannah; George Wash- 
ington and Ruth Elizabeth, both of whom have 
passed away; David, a resident of Free-port, 
Me. ; Pamelia, who became the wife of Alfred 




EDWARD HUSTON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



69 



Maybee, and resides in Yarmouth, Me. ; Hen 
jamin S. , who is now living in Falmouth, this 
State; Sarah F., now Mrs. Mitchell, who re- 
sides in Freeport ; Melissa, wife of E. H. Per- 
rington, of Portland ; Harriet Emma, who is 
no longer living; and two others who died in 
infancy. Mrs. David Huston died in March, 
1 870. 

Edward Huston passed his boyhood and 
youth upon the farm, assisting his father dur- 
ing the summer and attending the common 
schools in the winter. At the. age of twenty- 
one he commenced work in a brickyard in 
North Falmouth, where he remained for two 
years; then, in company with his brother, he 
bought a farm in Gray, which they conducted 
together for ten years. Mr. Huston next pur- 
chased a farm in Freeport, which he sold after 
a six years' residence there. Having bought 
a piece of farm property in Windham, this 
State, he moved to that town and was there 
profitably engaged in agricultural pursuits for 
eleven years. At the end of that period he 
sold the Windham farm, and, once more re- 
turning to Gray, purchased the old homestead, 
on which he has since resided. His farm is 
well located, and consists of one hundred acres 
of good fertile land. Since taking possession 
Mr. Huston has greatly improved the property, 
thereby adding materially to its value. He 
is capable, energetic, and persevering, taking 
advantage of every opportunity for increasing 
the amount arid improving the quality of his 
crops; and his efforts have been attended with 
good results. 

On February 22, 1852, Mr. Huston was 
united in marriage to Miss Caroline Floyd, 
who was born in Harrison, Me., October 15, 
1834. Mrs. Huston is a daughter of Isaac 
Floyd, who was for many years a thriving cooper 
of Harrison. Both her father and mother have 
passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Huston are the 
parents of three children — David F. , who 
resides at home; Walter J., who married Mrs. 
Cole, and resides in Ouincy, Mass., where he- 
is engaged in stone cutting; and John P. N. , 
residing at home. 

Mr. Huston is a Republican in politics, but 
has never aspired to public office. He takes, 
however, a lively and practical interest in all 
movements relative to the moral or material 



advancement of the community, ami is a mem- 
ber of the Sons of Temperance of West Gray. 
His portrait is presented on a neighboring page 
of this volume as that of a useful and highly 
esteemed citizen, a native and long a resident 
of this count y. 



DVVIN FAXON VOSE, M.D, the 
leading physician in Portland of the 
homoeopathic school, was bom in 
Watertown, Mass., October 17, 1850. He is 
a son of Henry C. and Rachel W. (Faxon) 
Vose, and is of Puritan descent through both 
parents. The Vose family was represented at 
the settlement of Boston, and the name is on 
record among the founders of Milton in 1632. 
Dr. Vose's great-grandfather was a soldier of 
the First Massachusetts Regiment in the Rev- 
olutionary army, while a brother of his great- 
grandfather was Colonel of the same regiment. 
The grandfather of the Doctor was a shoe man- 
ufacturer in Providence, R. I. 

Henry C. Vose was a graduate of the Theo- 
logical Seminary of Clinton, N.Y. , and also 
of the Cleveland Homoeopathic Medical Col- 
lege. He preached as a clergyman of the 
Universalist Church at Watertown, Mass., and 
at Clinton, N.Y., and spent the last thirty 
years of his life in Marion, Mass. At the 
time of the uprising against Free Masonry, 
when it took courage to avow connection with 
the order, he was prominent in its councils, 
and battled for the cause of abolition, count- 
ing William Lloyd Garrison and other promi 
nent agitators among his personal friends. 
lie spoke on the antislavcry question to so 
many out-of-door meetings that he ruined his 
voice and was obliged to give up his work as 
a clergyman, after which he devoted the rest 
of his life to medical practice. Dr. Henry 
Vose died in 1887. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Rachel W. Faxon, was a native of 
Braintl'ee, Mass., a daughter of Thomas 
Faxon, She was a direct descendant of John 
Clark, who came over in the "Mayflower." 
Her grandfather, Thomas Faxon, a native of 
Stoughton, Mass., was one of the sturdy 
minute-men of Revolutionary times, so that 
through both father and mother Dr. Vose is 
eligible to be counted among the Sons of the 



7° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Revolution. Thomas Faxon, the father of 
Mrs. Vose, was a cattle dealer in the old drov- 
ing days, and was a very successful man. Mrs. 
Vose was the mother of eight children, and 
had attained an advanced age when she died 

in KSiJO. 

Edwin Faxon Vose was the fifth of his par- 
ents' children. He graduated from the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College, now included 
in the Boston University. After reading 
medicine for a while with his lather, he 
entered the homoeopathic department of Boston 
University, from which he graduated in 1876. 
He was House Surgeon of the Massachusetts 
Homoeopathic Hospital the year before his 
graduation. After receiving his diploma he 
located in Portland, forming a partnership 
with Dr. Eliphalet Clark, who was one of the 
pioneers of homoeopathy in the State of Maine. 
Two years later Dr. Clark retired, leaving Dr. 
Vose in full charge of their combined practice. 
In addition to his qualifications as a doctor of 
medicine, he is a skilful surgeon. United 
with his skill and thorough knowledge is a 
kindly and generous nature, which has won for 
him the confidence of all his patients. lie is 
a member of the Maine Academy of Medi- 
cine and President of the State Homoeopathic 
Medical Society, having been elected to the lat- 
ter office at the annual meeting held in 1895. 
When, in 1895, the legislature of Maine 
passed the bill requiring all physicians to 
register or pass an examination, he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Cleaves a member of the 
Examining Board. 

In 1876, July 5, Dr. Vose was married to 
Lizzie M., daughter of John and Lizzie (Mc- 
Curdy) Begg, of Brooklyn, N. Y. ; and the 
union has been blessed by two children — 
Eleanor Rachel anil Clifton Henry. In poli- 
tics he is a strong Republican; and, though not 
an aspirant for office, he has taken an active 
part in important conventions. In Masonry he 
is Past Master of Portland Lodge; Past- High 
Priest of Mount Vernon Chapter; Past Master 
11I Portland Council; Commander of Portland 
Commandery; a member of the Maine Order of 
High Priesthood; a member of the order of the 
Red Cross of Constantine; a member of the 
Royal Order of Scotland (whose membership 
is limited to three hundred in the United 



States, and which is controlled at Edinburgh, 
Scotland) ; a member of Aleppo Temple, 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine at Boston; and 
of the Maine Consistory, the thirty-second de- 
gree. Dr. Vose is Past Grand of Hadallah 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and a member of Una Encampment ; and he 
belongs to Bramhall Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias, and the Samoset Tribe of Red Men. 
He is a member of the Maine Charitable 
Mechanic Association and of the Sodality of 
the Sons of the Revolution, a Director of 
Falmouth B. and L. Association, a popular 
member of the Portland Club, and also of the 
Young Men's Athletic Association. He 
attends and supports the Congress Square 
Universalist Church. His residence is the 
handsome building, 612 Congress Street. 




mills 



ON. GEORGE W. LEIGHTON, of 
Westbrook, who for twenty years or 
more has held a most responsible 
position in the Cumberland paper- 
owned and conducted by Grant, Daniels 
& Co., now in the hands of S. D. Warren & 
Co., was born January 27, 1S43, son of Alvin 
and Hannah (Sawyer) Leighton, of Falmouth, 
Me. Ebenezer Leighton, his grandfather, 
followed farming throughout his life, first in 
Falmouth and later in Westbrook. He died 
at the latter place about 1858, aged eighty-two 
or eighty-three years. In religious belief he 
was a Methodist. Of his five children two arc- 
still living, namely: Lucy, the wile ol John 
Lamb, of Westbrook; and Emily, the widow 
of George \V. Cobb, of Deering, Me. 

Alvin Leighton was a stone mason and suc- 
cessfully worked at his trade during the 
greater part of his life. He was also engaged 
in the manufacture of brick. His wife bore 
him nine children, eight of whom are still 
living, namely: Sevvall Leighton, George W., 
Eben, Frank, and Charles Leighton, all resi- 
dents of Westbrook; Philena, who married 
George Barbour, of Westbrook; Hannah, the 
wife of William II. Bacon, of Boston, Mass. ; 
and Elvira, the wife of E. C. Swett, of West- 
brook. Their father died in 18S5, at the age 
of seventy-six years. He was an attendant of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVI K\V 



T 



George W. Leighton was educated in the 
common schools of Westbrook and Windham. 
After leaving school he worked for two years 
in an oakum-mill at Duck Pond, in the town 
of Westbrook, and for one year in the paper- 
mill of that place. He then was employed at 
the Cumberland mills as a common laborer. 
In a comparatively short space of time he was 
promoted to the charge of a washing-engine. 
After satisfactorily performing the duties of 
this position for five years he was transferred 
to the beating-engines, by which the last 
operation is performed before the material is 
rolled into sheets. With the exception of one 
year spent with Brekmaker, Moore & Co., 
paper-makers of Louisville, Ky. — a part 
having been passed at the Philadelphia Cen- 
tennial — Mr. Leighton has held this position 
during the past twenty years. 

Up to 1879 Mr. Leighton voted with the 
Republican party, but he has since been 
an adherent of the Democratic party. Mr. 
Leighton's political career began in 1881, 
when he was elected a Representative to the 
State legislature. In 1882 he was elected 
Selectman of Westbrook, and held that posi- 
tion until 1891, serving as Chairman of that 
Board for four years. In the first election for 
Mayor under the city charter held in 1891, he- 
ran against Leander Valentine, and was only 
defeated by two votes, the total vote having 
been larger than any cast since. His con- 
stituency demanded a recount; but Mr. Leigh- 
ton objected, and, gracefully calling Mr. 
Valentine to the platform, introduced him to 
the audience as their first Mayor, saying he 
was glad to see a way of retiring from the 
political field. Some time after, when the 
Board of Registration was created, Mayor 
Valentine appointed Mr. Leighton a member 
of it. He declined nomination for a second 
year, as the office disfranchised its occupant 
for the term. He has also declined nomina- 
tion for the Mayoralty for the last two years. 

In February, 1864, he was joined in mar- 
riage with Miss Mary Cragin, a daughter of 
John Cragin, of Westbrook, and they had two 
children, namely: Annie, now the wife of 
A. N. Waterhouse, of Westbrook; ami John, 
who is learning the machinist's trade at the 
Knowlton machine shop in Westbrook. 



Mr. Leighton is well known in fraternal 
circles, being a member of Warren Phillips 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Cumberland Mills; 
Saccarappa Lodge, No. 11, Independent 
Order oi <- lAd Fellows of Westbrook; Cum 
mings Encampment, Independent Order oi 
Odd Fellows of Westbrook; Presumpscot 
Valley Lodge, No. 4, Knights of Pythias 1 I 
Cumberland Mills ; Pequaket Lodge, No. 100, 
Independent Order of Red .Men of Cumber- 
land Mills; Westbrook Commandery, No. 
289, United Order of the Golden Cross; and 
the Cumberland Mills Relief Association. 



2 LANDER H. MOULTON, station 
agent at Sebago Lake, was born 
August 22, 1840, in the town of 
Standish, this county and State, 
being a son of Josiah Moulton and a grandson 
of Simon and Abigail (Plaisted) Moulton. 
A more extended account of his ancestral his 
tory may be found in the sketch of Lewis W. 
Moulton on another page of this volume. 

Josiah Moulton, father of Leander H., was 
a native of Standish, being born in this town 
June 8, 1S05, and here spending a long and 
useful life, dying at the venerable age of 
ninety years. He was an industrious, prac- 
tical farmer, and, in addition, was for many 
years engaged in lumbering. He took an 
active part in local politics, being a prominent 
member of the Democratic party, and for a 
number of terms served very acceptably as 
Selectman of the town. To him and his wife, 
Martha Hasty, daughter of Daniel Hasty, of 
this town, were born four children, Leander 
H. being the only one now living. 

Leander II. Moulton received an academical 
education in Standish and Fryeburg, being 
prepared for the profession of a teacher. He 
subsequently taught school during the fall and 
winter terms for ten years or more in Standish 
and Windham, while in the summer seasons 
he worked on the parental homestead. In 
1870 Mr. Moulton was appointed station agent 
on the Portland & Ogdensburg Railway (now 
the Maine Central) at Sebago Lake, a position 
which he has since held, except during a short 
period. lie had previously engaged in the 
manufacture of clothing at Sebago Lake, and 



1~ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



left his railway office for a short time in order 
that he might close out his clothing business. 
Having satisfactorily disposed of it, Mr. Moul- 
ton returned to the station at Sebago Lake, 
where he has since remained. 

On February 27, 1867, Mr. M mil tun was 
united in marriage with Florence A., daughter 
of Daniel VV. Dole, of South Windham. In 
politics Mr. Moulton is a member of the Re- 
publican party, and has taken some part in 
public affairs, having been Selectman several 
years, and serving at the present time as super- 
intendent of the schools of Standish. Re- 
ligiously, both Mr. and Mrs. Moulton are 
liberal ami progressive in their views, he being 
a Unitarian and she a Universalist. 




ARTIN L. KFYES, an esteemed 
resident of Gorham, Me., was born 
in Lempster, Sullivan County, 
N. FL, February 19, 1850. His 
grandfather, Mezclda Keyes, was a native of 
Acworth in the same county and State, his 
birth taking place in the year 1770. He was 
engaged in farming throughout his long and 
active life. He was a Democrat in politics; 
and in religion both he and his wife, whose 
maiden name was Sarah Foster, were members 
of the Congregational church. Their son, 
Orison, father of Martin L. Keyes, was born 
April 2, 1819, in Acworth, N.H., where in 
early life he learned the trade of a wheel- 
wright. He subsequently practised his trade 
in Lempster, and was also engaged there in 
the manufacture of carriages, sleighs, tubs, 
buckets, etc. He died in Lempster in 1877. 
Like his father, he was a steadfast adherent of 
the Democratic party. He married Lucina 
A., daughter of Robert McClure, of Acworth, 
and their household circle was enlarged by the 
birth of nine children, five of whom are now 
living, as follows: Anson L. , who now resides 
in Faribault, Minn., married Ilattie Lufkin, of 
Great Falls, N. II., and has one child, Lulu 
M. ; Nettie E., now a resident of Holyoke, 
Mass., became the wife of William Brooks, of 
Acworth; Martin I.., whose name appears at 
the head of this sketch; Frank E., a resident 
of New York City, married Alice J. Dana, of 
Acworth, anil they have two children — Forest 



and Maud; Belle S. , wife of E. H. Allen, of 
Holyoke, Mass., has one child, Donna B. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Orison Keyes were mem- 
bers of the Congregational church of Acworth. 

Martin L. Keyes was educated in the public 
schools of Lempster, N.H., anil was subse- 
quently engaged for fifteen years in that town 
in the manufacture of carriages and sleighs; in 
addition to this he manufactured lumber and 
house furnishings, conducted a mercantile 
business, and, with his brother, F. E. Keyes, 
operated a grist-mill and carried on a substan- 
tial trade in grain and flour. In 1885 he came 
t > Cumberland County, accepting the superin- 
tendency of the mills owned by the Indurated 
Fibre Company of North Gorham. This com- 
pany has been reorganized and its name 
changed several times since then ; but Mr. 
Keyes retained his office, being superintendent 
of the works, which are now incorporated 
under the name of the "United Indurated 
Fibre Company of New Jersey. " The mills 
in Gorham were shut down in 1894, the busi- 
ness being removed to Lockport, N.Y. ; but 
when running at full time they gave employ- 
ment to one hundred and fifty men. 

Mr. Keyes has been twice married. His 
first wife, to whom he was married October 4, 
1876, was Isadore P. Stowell, daughter of Al- 
bert Stowell, of Unity, N. H. She died Feb- 
ruary 28, 1886, having been the mother of one 
child — Mabel L., born May 9, 1880. 

On December 12, 1887, Mr. Keyes was 
united to his present wife, whose maiden name 
was Jennie Grossman, she being a daughter of 
Sullivan Grossman, of Lowell, Mass. In poli- 
tics Mr. Keyes is a Democrat. Socially, he 
is a Mason, belonging to Mount Vernon Lodge, 
No. 15, A. F. & A. M., of Newport, N.H., 
and to Presumpscot Tribe of Red Men, No. 21, 
of North Gorham. Both he and his wife at- 
tend the Congregational church. 



OHN F. A. MERRILL, attorney and 
counsellor -at-law, was born in Portland, 
February 10, 1866. His parents were 
Charles B. and Abba Isabella (Little) 
Merrill. His paternal grandfather, Dr. John 
Merrill, was for many years identified with the 
history of Cumberland County, as he practised 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



73 



medicine in Portland for more than half a cen- 
tury, being one of the leading physicians of his 
time. The old family homestead at 65 Spring 
Street was built by Dr. Merrill's father-in-law, 
Mr. Joseph Coffin Boyd, who settled in Port- 
land in his early manhood. His daughter, 
Mrs. Dr. Merrill, was one of fifteen children. 
An interesting history of the Boyd family may 
be found in "Americans of Royal Descent." 

Mr. Merrill's maternal grandfather, Josiah 
Stover Little, was born in Newburyport, 
Mass., but moved to Portland, Me., where he 
served as President of the Atlantic & St. Law- 
rence Railroad, and was connected with the 
largest enterprises of the city. Mr. Little 
was graduated from Bowdoin College in 1828, 
in the class with Longfellow, Hawthorne, and 
Franklin Pierce. Lie was at one time a mem- 
ber and Speaker of the Maine House of Repre- 
sentatives; hut lie was not specially active in 
politics. His wife, Abba Isabella, was a 
daughter of Joseph Chamberlain, whose ances- 
tors came from Vermont, but subsequently 
moved to Boston, where Mr. Chamberlain be- 
came a well-known tea merchant. Some time 
after Mr. Little's death the grandmother mar- 
ried Mr. . George T. Davis, of Greenfield, 
Mass., continuing, however, to live in Port- 
land until her death in 1893. She was a dis- 
tinguished society leader of her time. The 
Little residence on State Street is now owned 
and occupied by Mr. Weston F. Milliken. 

Charles B. Merrill, the father of the special 
subject of this sketch, was born in Portland. 
in 1827. He was graduated from Bowdoin 
College in the class of 1847, and later from 
Harvard Law School. Being admitted to the 
bar, he practised law until the breaking out of 
the Southern Rebellion, when he was placed in 
charge of Camp Berry, the rendezvous of the 
newly enlisted soldiers. Receiving the com- 
mission of Lieutenant Colonel of the Seven- 
teenth Maine Infantry, he served three years 
in command of the regiment, which took active 
part in several of the principal engagements 
of the war, including the battle of Gettysburg. 
After his return from the war he engaged in 
mercantile pursuits in this city, until a short 
time before his death, which occurred in 1S91. 
He and his wife had eight children, of whom 
the two now surviving are Charles P. and John. 



Live died in childhood; and another, Isabella 
Little, died in May, 1 894. 

John F. A. Merrill, the younger son, was 
graduated from Vale College in 1889, and 
studied law with William L. Putnam, now 
Judge of the Circuit Court of Appeals. He 
spent one year in Harvard Law School, and 
was admitted to the bar of Cumberland 
County in April, 1892. He then opened a 
law office on Exchange Street, where he has 
successfully practised ever since. In politics 
Mr. Merrill is a Democrat. 

His only brother, Charles P. Merrill, an 
owner and manager of the Ellingwood Furni- 
ture Company at 100 Exchange Street, Port- 
land, was born in this city, September 18, 
1864. After attending Yale College two 
years he left his class to become a member of 
the firm of Bennett & Merrill, manufacturers 
of ladies' shoes on Warren Street, New York. 
Later he severed his connection with that con- 
cern and returned to Portland, where he has 
since been engaged in the furniture business. 
The Merrill brothers dwell in the house that 
was their father's birthplace and lifelong resi- 
dence, the home endeared to them by pleasant 
recollections of childhood and youth. 



JB 



ANIEL M. RAND, a thriving drug- 
gist of South Windham, was born in 
Gorham, Me., the date of his nativity 
being March 6, 1854. His ances- 
tors on both paternal and maternal sides have 
been identified with the interests of Cumber- 
land County for several generations. His 
grandfather, Benjamin Rand, was an honored 
citizen of Stand ish, where his death occurred 
in 1829. He married Annie, daughter of 
James and Elizabeth S. Moody; and she pre- 
ceded him to the land from which no traveller 
returns, passing away February 23, 1827. 
She bore her husband four children, of whom 
Samuel M., father of Daniel M., was the 
youngest. Samuel M. Rand was born Decem- 
ber 30, 1820, in Gorham, Me., and died May 
24, 1887. On April 20, 1850, he married 
Hannah Moulton, daughter of Daniel Moul- 
ton, of Standish. She is still living, being a 
resident of Gorham and an esteemed member of 
the Free Will Baptist church. To her and her 



74 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



husband two children were born — Daniel M. 
and Clarence. Clarence Rand, bom Novem- 
ber 25, 18.51, has been twice married, his first 
wife being Estclle Titcomb, of Portland, Me. 
His second wife, who lived but a few months 
after their marriage, was Amelia Kenworthy, 
of Gorham. She left one child, Clara. 

Daniel M. Rand acquired the rudiments of 
his education in the district schools of his na- 
tive town. On leaving school, he went to 
Biddeford; where he worked for ten years in a 
cotton-mill, going from there to South Wind- 
ham, where he was employed for several years 
with the Sebago Wood Board Company. 
Being attracted toward pharmacy, he entered 
the drug store of George W. Swett, of South 
Windham, staying with him a year, and sub- 
sequently went to Bethel, where he studied 
the science for two years. In 1890 he opened 
his present store, and during the five years or 
nunc that he has been in business has ac- 
quired an extensive patronage. 

Mr. Rand has been twice married. His 
first wife, Lizzie Mogan, of Bangor, left him 
one child, Milton D., born September 10, 
1879. O' 1 December 7, 1895, he was united 
in marriage with Nellie E. Beck, of White 
Rock Village, Gorham. In politics Mr. Rind 
is a stanch Republican. In religion he is 
liberal in his views, believing in the father- 
hood of God and the brotherhood of man. He 
is identified with several social organizations, 
being a member of Oriental Lodge, No. 17, 
Knights of Pythias, of South Windham; the 
Improved Order of Red Men, Nagwamqueg 
Tribe, No. 36, of South Windham: and Cum- 
berland Lodge, N. E. O. P., of Portland, 
this State. 



tLEWELLYN BARTON, attorney and 
counsellor-at-law, of Portland, Me., is 
one of that large class of men in 
this country who owe their success 
in life to self-reliance and a determination to 
make the most of their opportunities. He 
was born at Naples, Cumberland County, Me., 
November 24, 1854. His early life was spent 
upon a farm. At the age of fifteen years he 
became an apprentice to the carpenter's trade, 
which occupation he afterward more or less 



regularly followed for twenty years. He 
graduated from Bridgton Academy, North 
Bridgton, Me., in 1880, and from Bowdoin 
College in 1S84. While studying in these 
institutions, he met his expenses, with the aid 
of a scholarship, by teaching school in winter 
and working at his trade in summer. In col- 
lege he always took an active part in literal)' 
and athletic exercises. He was one of the 
founders and supporters of the Bowdoin Liter- 
ary Association. He received several awards 
for oratorical and literary excellence in speak- 
ing and writing; was President of his college 
fraternity, member of the college jury, mem- 
ber of King Chapel choir and the college 
quartette, and one of the editors of the /.Vre- 
doin Orient. His defence, while a Sophomore, 
at an indignation meeting of the students, of 
a luckless Freshman, charged with a misde- 
meanor, was an early indication of the inde- 
pendence and moral courage that have since 
distinguished him. The whilom Freshman 
is now one of the editors of a prominent daily 
of this State, and his pen is as caustic as of 
yore. 

In the fall of 1885 Mr. Barton began the 
study of law with the well-known firm of 
Nathan & Henry B. Cleaves, of Portland, 
where he remained two years. Just before 
being admitted to the bar, he accepted, in 
August, 1887, the principalship of Bridgton 
Academy for two years. He remained there 
five years, during which the school was never 
more prosperous. In the winter of 1890, 
through his efforts and the generous contribu- 
tions of two wealthy alumni, the grounds 
were enlarged and beautified. The school 
buildings were remodelled and enlarged, and 
the faculty was increased, and the courses of 
study improved at a cost of nearly two thou- 
sand dollars. < The plans, specifications, and 
labor, were all furnished by Mr. Barton, he 
being the contractor. Designing to resume 
the study of the law, he resigned the prin- 
cipalship. In the following August he was 
elected a Trustee of the academy. 

He was admitted to the Cumberland bar at 
Portland in April, 1893. Before this he had 
the unique distinction of having been per- 
mitted by the presiding judge, who afterward 
examined him for admission, to conduct a case 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



75 



in the Supreme Court. Immediately alter his 
admission he became associated in the prac- 
tice of law with General Charles P. Mattocks 
at 31 1-2 Exchange Street, Portland. His 
first cases involved questions which the court 
had not adjudicated. In a brief time after 
this he won reputation and standing by con- 
ducting several well-known legal contests. 
One of the most important of these was that 
which arose out of the famous Naples school 
controversy, and involved the interpretation 
of the new school law for the first time, and 
was of such interest that the whole State 
awaited the decision of the court of last re- 
sort, whereby the position of Mr. Barton and 
his associate was sustained in every particu- 
lar. 

Mr. Barton married September 19, 1894, 
Miss Grace Luette Newman, of Portland. 
They reside at 122 Free Street, Portland, Me. 
Both are regular attendants of the State Street 
Congregational Church, of which Mrs. Barton 
is a member. Mr. Barton is a member of 
Cumberland Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Bridgton, Me., and also of the 
Theta Delta Chi fraternity. Mr. Barton has 
always been interested in educational matters: 
and in his brief respites from school work he 
found time to compile and publish several 
books for use in public schools, his most am- 
bitious work of this kind being an "Algebraic 
Review," quite extensively used. In politics 
Mr. Barton has been a Democrat from his 
youth, and has filled various public offices in 
his native town. In the fall of [884, immedi- 
ately after his graduation from college, he was 
elected Representative to the State legislature 
from the district including the towns of 
Naples, Raymond, and Sebago. On that occa- 
sion he received a letter from President Joshua 
L. Chamberlain, of Bowdoin, congratulating 
him upon his election and predicting for him 
in politics a notable future, which would 
doubtless have been realized had not the com- 
munity and State been so strongly Republican. 
During his term he served on the Committee 
of Mines and Mining and the Joint Temper- 
ance Committee. He took a conspicuous part 
in the discussions of the house, proving him- 
self a ready and effective debater. He drafted 
the original Druggists' Bill, so called, which 



lacked only a few votes of passing the house, 
although the dominant party were very bitter 
against any temperance laws, on account of 
St. John's movement in the national campaign 
in 18S4. At the close of the session Mr. 
Barton was chosen to present the customary 
vote of thanks to the Speaker on behalf of t he- 
minority. 

In 1888 Mr. Barton was the party candidate 
for Registrar of Deeds for Cumberland County, 
anil in 1890 for Registrar of Probate in the 
same county. In 1891 he was chosen Chair- 
man of the Board of Selectmen for the town 
of Bridgton, a town which had been steadily 
Republican by a large majority for thirty 
years. In 1892 he was the Democratic candi- 
date for Representative to the legislature from 
the same town, and lacked only twenty-six 
votes of election, running far ahead of his 
ticket. At the opening of the legislature in 
1894, he was the Democratic candidate for 
State Assessor, the only office he ever sought, 
and lacked only eight votes of election. For 
the past few years he has taken an active part 
in every State and national campaign, speak- 
ing in various parts of the State. In 1S93 he 
became Secretary of the Young Men's Demo- 
cratic Club of Portland. He declined a re- 
election to this office, having been chosen at 
the State Convention in June, 1893, a member 
of the State Committee for Cumberland 
County, a capacity in which he still serves. 
His political methods have always been clean, 
if aggressive; and he has uniformly com- 
manded the respect of his political opponents. 



HOMAS BROWN, proprietor of a cloth- 
ing store in Bridgton, Me., was born 
July 14, 1834, in Herr)' Prow, near 
Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England, being one 
of a family of ten children (four boys and six- 
girls), born to George and Martha Brown. 
Mr. Brown may be justly regarded as a self- 
made man, having begun life with no capital 
save his willing heart, courageous spirit, and 
strong hands. By persevering industry and 
thrift he has gradually climbed the ladder 
of success, and has an assured position among 
the prosperous business men of Cumberland 
County. 



76 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



At an carl)" age Mr. Brown began working 
in a woollen-mill, remaining in the country of 
his birth until 1863, when he sailed on the 
steamer " Bohemian " for America. He first 
found employment in a woollen-mill at Dex- 
ter, this State, remaining there ten months, 
and going thence to Lisbon, and subsequently 
to Sabattusville, where he secured the posi- 
tion of overseer of the mill. Five years later 
Mr. Brown removed to Portland, in which city 
he lived a year and a half, coming thence to 
Bridgton in 1871. The following two years 
he worked in the Forest Mills, after which he 
made a trip to his native land, staying four 
months with his relatives and friends. On 
his return to this State Mr. Brown became 
overseer in the Lisbon Falls mills, resigning 
that position at the end of five years to accept 
a similar office in the Forest Mills of Bridg- 
ton. In 1879 ' 1C started in business on his 
own account, opening the clothing store 
which he has since conducted with signal 
success, having built up a large and lucrative 
trade. 

On December 24, i860, the union of Mr. 
Brown with Miss Harriet, daughter of David 
Hopkins, was solemnized. Mrs. Brown is a 
native of Vermont, in which State she was 
reared and educated. She is a conscientious 
member of the Baptist church. Socially, Mr. 
Brown belongs to the Knights of Pythias. In 
religion he is a Universalist, and in politics a 
Democrat. 




kELVILLE B. FULLER, an in- 
fluential business man of South 
Portland, Me., is a native of this 
State, having been born in Paris, 
( )\!ord County, where his grandfather, Caleb 
Fuller, was an early settler. The grandfather 
was born and reared in Massachusetts, remov- 
ing from that State to Paris, where he cleared 
a large tract of forest land, improving it into 
a good farm, on which he resided until his 
death in 1850, at the ripe old age of ninety 
years. He reared a family of eight children, 
of whom Dr. Andrew J. Fuller, a physician 
in active practice in Bath, this State, is the 
only surviving child. 

Amos Fuller, father of Melville B., was 



born and educated in the town of Paris, where 
in his very early manhood, he was for a time 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. He subse- 
quently went into the hotel business at Paris 
Hill, and so continued for several years, when 
he again resumed farm labors. While pursu- 
ing this peaceful vocation, he became inter- 
ested in religious subjects, finally becoming 
converted to the Methodist faith, and joining 
that church; and during the two years preced- 
ing his death, which occurred in 1S46, he was 
pastor of the Methodist church at Orland. 
Of his union with Marianda Perry five chil- 
dren were born, three of whom are now living, 
namely: Benjamin C, a mason, who lives in 
Portland; Melville B., whose name heads 
this article; and V. B. Fuller, a grocer in 
Portland. 

Melville B. Fuller received the rudiments 
of his education in the schools of Paris, after- 
ward completing his studies in the town of 
Wayne. There he learned the cabinet-maker's 
trade, which he followed for six years, when 
he removed to Portland, where he was engaged 
for another six years as foreman of the stilling- 
room in the Portland kerosene oil works. 
In 1862 Mr. Fuller formed a copartnership 
with his brother-in-law, Mr. W. Stinchfield, 
who was at the head of the firm, establishing 
.a grocery business at Cape Elizabeth, now 
South Portland, and remaining in company 
with him four years. In 1S66 Mr. Fuller's 
brother, V. B. Fuller, bought the interest of 
the senior partner, the business being contin- 
ued for the next ten years under the firm name 
of Fuller Brothers. At the end of that time 
Mr. Stinchfield bought the entire business, 
which he conducted for two years, when Mr. 
Fuller and his brother again purchased the 
store, and under their former firm title carried 
on a good grocery trade until 188 1, when Mel- 
ville B. luiller bought out his brother's inter- 
est, and took into partnership his eldest son, 
Charles L. Fuller, the business having since 
then been successfully carried on under its 
present style of M. B. Fuller & Son. Mr. 
Fuller has taken an active part in advancing 
the town's interests, contributing generously 
toward all beneficial enterprises, and for the 
past two years has served as Selectman. In 
politics he is a true blue Republican, and in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIF.W 



77 



religion is liberal, believing in the fatherhood 
of God and the brotherhood of man. 

On June 25, 1858, Mr. Fuller was married 
to Miss Celia E. Wing, daughter of Oben 
Wing, of Wayne, this State, and into their 
household circle four children have been born, 
three of whom are living, namely: Mrs. Nell 
Wing, wife of E. T. Wing, of Lowell, Mass.; 
Charles L., who is in partnership with his 
lather; and Francis W., at home. 




yyOLOMON CONANT, a former well- 
z/\ known resident of Westbrook and 
an extensive real estate owner, was 
born in Westbrook, March 30, iSoi, 
son of Daniel and Mary (Haskell) Conant. 
The ancestors of his family were among the 
first settlers of Cumberland County; and his 
grandfather, Samuel Conant, was a resident of 
Westbrook in the early days of the town. 
Samuel did a good man's part in paving the 
way for the development of the locality, and 
the result of his labor is visible in the sub- 
stantial prosperity enjoyed by his descendants 
and the present residents of the place. He 
was a Congregational ist in his religious views. 
Samuel Conant's father, Lot, was a grandson 
of Roger Conant, the first settler of the name 
in America, who was in reality the first Gov- 
ernor of the Massachusetts Bay Colon v. 

Daniel Conant, who was born in the old 
Pork Hill House in Westbrook, in young man- 
hood engaged in lumbering, which at that time 
constituted the principal occupation of the in- 
habitants. He conducted a successful busi- 
ness during the active period of his life, and 
he resided in Westbrook until his death. He- 
supported the Democratic party in politics, 
and attended the Congregational church. His 
wife, who was a native of Westbrook, became 
the mother of seven children, all of whom 
have passed away. 

Solomon Conant, having attended the pub- 
lic schools of his native town for the usual 
period, engaged in teaming, an occupation 
which he followed for the greater part of his 
active life. He was for many years employed 
by the Warren family, hauling lumber from 
their mills in Westbrook to Portland and else- 
where. He was also largely engaged in agri- 



culture, employing many hands, and he owned 
much valuable farm property in Gorham and 
Westbrook. He was possessed of unusual 
energy and ability, was generally respected, 
and occupied a leading position among the 
residents of Westbrook. He was an adherent 
of the Democratic party in politics, and I'm 
some years he ably served as a member of the 
Board of Selectmen. As a citizen his aid and 
influence were always used for the best inter- 
ests of the community. As a husband and 
father he was kind, considerate, generous, and 
self-sacrificing; and his happiest moments were 
passed in his family circle. He died at his 
comfortable home in 1869. His religious 
faith was that of his forefathers, all of whom 
were of the Congregationalist denomination. 

In 1850 Mr. Conant was united in matri- 
mony to Susan Small Libby, daughter of An- 
drew Libby, of Gray, Me., and became the 
father of four children, of whom two are now- 
living, namely: Daniel, who occupies the old 
homestead; and Hattie L., wife of George W, 
Norton, of Portland. Mary I']., who was the 
wife of the late Henry S. McLellan, was the 
eldest of the children. She died January 20, 
1892. The third child, Willie A., died in 
infancy. 

Mrs. Conant, who still resides in West- 
brook, is widely known as a most amiable and 
intelligent lady, and is highly esteemed and 
respected. Daniel Conant, who appears to 
have inherited his lather's ability, enjoys a 
large measure of prosperity, as well as the 
good will of his neighbors and fellow-towns- 
men. 




LONZO HIGHT, Inspector of Customs 
at the United States custom-house at 
Portland, was born September 20, 
1846, in Saco, Me. His grand- 
father, Dr. Samuel 1 1 i g; 1 1 1 , was engaged as a 
tiller of the soil at Dayton, York County. He 
had studied medicine; and, when a young 
man, he served as surgeon on board a pri- 
vateer. While thus employed, he was taken 
prisoner and carried to Dartmouth, N.S. On 
his escape he returned to Dayton, where he 
lived until retiring from active labor, when he 
removed to Biddeford, where he passed his last 



78 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years, dying at the advanced age of eighty- 
six years. Elisha Hight, father of -Alonzo, 
was born in Dayton, York County, where he 
learned and for some time carried on the trade 
of harness-making. He was subsequently en- 
gaged in the same occupation at Saco for many 
years before his demise in May, 1875. H e 
was a soldier in the late Civil War, serving 
at the front with the brave boys of the Four- 
teenth Maine Volunteer Infantry. He mar- 
ried Miss Isabelle Milliken, daughter of Joel 
Milliken, of North Saco, when they were both 
very young, his bride being but sixteen years 
of age. They became the parents of thirteen 
children, seven of whom are still living — 
Charles, a resident of Saco; Alonzo, the sub- 
ject of this notice; Anna, the wife of J. H. 
Ramsey, of Portland; George E., of this city; 
Luella, wife of William E. Noble, of Chelsea, 
Me.; Herbert and William E., also residents 
<>f Saco. Both the father and mother were 
prominent members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, the mother being still an active 
chinch worker. Mr. Milliken, a farmer by 
occupation, was of pioneer ancestry. His 
grandfather, an early settler of Saco, was 
killed by the Indians. 

Alonzo Hight received a practical education 
in the common schools of Saco. After leav- 
ing school he worked with his father at the 
harness trade for a time. When seventeen 
years old he ran away from home, and enlisted 
in the navy, from which his father afterward 
obtained his release. In January, 1865, he 
enlisted in Company K, Thirtieth Maine Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and was stationed with his 
regiment in the Shenandoah Valley until the 
assassination of Lincoln, when the regiment 
was sent to guard Washington, remaining 
there until after the Grand Review. The 
men expected then to be sent home, but in- 
stead were ordered to Savannah, Ga., where 
they did garrison duty until September, when 
they were remanded to Portland, Me., here 
receiving their discharge. Mr. Hight was 
subsequently engaged in various occupations. 
He had charge of J. W. Peatty's belt factory 
at Saco lor a time, and continued in the manu- 
facturing business for ten years. While a 
resident of that citv, he served as Ward Clerk 
one year, Councilman from Ward 4 one 



year, and Alderman from the same ward, being 
elected on the Democratic ticket two years. 
In the fall of 18S6 he received the appoint- 
ment of Special Inspector; and in the follow- 
ing spring President Cleveland appointed him 
Regular Inspector, an office which he has 
since ably filled. For the past six winters 
Mr. Hight has had to examine all the baggage 
and freight coming into this port over the 
Allan and Dominion lines of steamers plying 
between here and Liverpool via Halifax, dur- 
ing the cold weather, and all the goods brought 
in on the ocean boats throughout each year. 
On his appointment to this important office 
Mr. I light moved to Portland, where he now 
makes his home. 

On October 3, 1867, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Ellen Foster, daughter of 
Stephen and Abigail Foster, of South Thomas- 
ton, this State. Five children have been 
born of the union, four of whom are living. 
These are: Pert C. and Arthur L., who are 
with the Portland company; Mabel C, the 
wife of Walter Anderson, of this city; and 
Edith. Mr. and Mrs. Hight are highly es- 
teemed throughout the community, and are 
regular attendants of the Congregational 
church. Mr. Hight is a charter member of 
Fred S. Gurney Post, No. 36, of Saco, -and 
belongs to Trinity Lodge, Knights of Pythias 
of Portland. 




C7YLKXANDLR McINTOSII PARKER, 
M.D., is in point of practice the 
oldest physician in the city of Deer- 
ing, Me., having been located at 
Morrill Coiners since 1859. He was born at 
Durham, this State, where his maternal grand- 
father, John Mcintosh, resided for man)- years, 
having emigrated from Scotland to this country 
to serve in the war of the Revolution. Peter 
Parker, the Doctor's father, lived and died in 
Durham, being a sturdv tiller <>f the soil din- 
ing his years of activity. Of his union with 
Miss Marcia Mcintosh, daughter of John Mc- 
intosh, eleven children were -born, Alexander 
M. being the sixth child. The parents were 
people of eminent piety and worthy members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Alexander Parker gleaned the rudiments of 




ALEXANDER M. PARKER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his education in the public and private schools 
of his native town, after which he read medi- 
cine, first with Dr. F. G. Warren, then prac- 
tising in Pownal, but now in Riddeford, and, 
secondly, with Dr. N. II. Care)-, of Durham, 
lie subsequently attended Bowdoin College, 
afterward taking two courses at the Harvard 
Medical College, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1856. Entering upon the duties of 
his profession in the town of Dresden, Dr. 
Parker built up a good practice, having an 
extensive country ride. In 1859, desiring 
a larger field of action, he came to Morrill 
Corners, where from the first he has met with 
gratifying success, his reputation for ability 
and integrity being unsurpassed by that of 
an\' of his professional brethren. 

In 1863 Dr. Parker went with the First 
Maine Volunteer Cavalry as Assistant Surgeon 
(if the regiment, joining the Army of the Poto- 
mac in Virginia, April 15, 1863. He was 
present at many of the warmly contested 
battles of that and the following year, being 
at the engagement at Brandy Station, at 
Chancellorsville during the Stoneman raid 
(when the Confederate soldiers, who were close 
to the rear of our army, were particularly mis- 
chievous), at Gettysburg, Cold Harbor, Spott- 
sylvania, and at the siege of Petersburg. He 
was taken prisoner near Charlestown, Va., on 
July 15, 1863, and was confined in Libby 
Prison for nearly four months. On account of 
ill health the Doctor was soon after granted 
leave of absence. His wife being sick of con- 
sumption, he resigned, having served faithfully 
for eighteen months, ami at once resumed his 
practice in this locality. For the past few 
years he has been the City Physician, an office 
which he fills with great acceptability. 

Dr. Parker is a decided Republican in poli- 
tics, but not an office-seeker. He is connected 
by membership with the Maine Medical Asso- 
ciation and with the Cumberland County Asso- 
ciation. Socially, he is an Odd Fellow, be- 
longing to Ligonia Lodge of Portland, and is 
a Mason of high standing, being a member of 
Atlantic Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Portland, 
and of Greenleaf Chapter, Royal Arch Masons. 

Dr. Parker has been three times married. 
His first wife was Miss Mary C. Corbett, of 
Durham. His second wife, formerly Eliza Ann 



Sawyer, died in early womanhood, leaving two 
daughters, namely: Carrie, who married 
Charles E. Clark, of Yarmouth, and has one 
chihl, named Edna Louise; and Alice Mary, 
wife of the Rev. W. II. Gould, of Dexter, 
Me., who has one child, Ella P. Gould. Dr. 
Parker subsequently married Mrs Florentine 
C. Walker, widow of Captain Joseph E. 
Walker and daughter of James Sawyer. Mrs. 
Parker's father was one of the founders of the 
town of Dcering, where she was born, although 
she was reared and educated in Portland. 



§AMES E. TRIPP, the present owner ol 
the old Nash homestead, as it is famil- 
iarly known, in Raymond, Cumberland 
County, Me., was born in New 
Gloucester, a neighboring town, on September 
2, 1841. His parents were John and Deborah 
(Verrill) Tripp, the former of whom was a 
native of North Raymond and the latter of 
Raymond. 

John Tripp spent his life as a farmer, first 
engaging in that vocation in North Raymond, 
from which place he afterward removed to 
New Gloucester, settling on a farm near Upper 
Gloucester, where he lived for eight years. 
He then returned to Raymond and spent the 
remainder of his life on the old Tripp home- 
stead. In addition to his agricultural labors 
he carried on a wood-working business. He 
died on September 16, 1861. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Deborah Verrill, lived until 
November 30, 1881, surviving him a little 
over twenty years. They were the parents 
of six children, of whom the following is a 
brief record: Mary E., bom September 19, 
1829, married for her first husband Richard 
Verrill, and after his death she became the wife 
of Lafayette Tenney, with whom she now lives 
in North Raymond ; Cibele C, born Septem- 
ber 25, 1S31, now the widow of Elisha P. 
Proctor, resides in North Raymond; Julia 
A., born June 26, 1834, who is also a resident 
of North Raymond, is the widow of Jonas J. 
Morrill; Hannah M., born June 24, 1S35, 
married Randall Barton (deceased), and died 
June 1, 1S64; Dorcas J., born Jul} 12, [838, 
is the wife of Judah Hall, of Saco, Me. ; and 
James E. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



James E. Tripp is the youngest member of 
his father's family. At nineteen years of age 
lie went to work in the woollen factory at 
Windham, Me. ; but six months later he re- 
turned home to take charge of the old Tripp 
homestead and to care for his parents during 
their declining years. Purchasing the farm 
after the death of his father, he continued to 
live there until 1866, when he sold out and 
bought what was then known as the town 
farm; and after living there for a year he sold 
out and moved into a house belonging to a 
Mr. Spiller, engaging in the shoemaker's trade 
in connection with farming. A year later he 
commenced work for Mr. J. D. Spiller on his 
farm ; and at the end of another year he repur- 
chased the old Tripp homestead, to which he 
moved, and during the following five years was 
successfully engaged in carrying it on. lie 
then sold that place and went to Webb's Mills, 
where he was engaged in the axe-handle busi- 
ness for five years, and bought a house and lot 
there. After engaging in the nursery business 
for three years, he changed his house and lot 
for a small farm known as the Rogers place 
it Webb's Mills; later he sold that farm, and 
on Ma)' 24, 1884, he purchased the place 
which he still occupies. The estate contains 
about seventy-five acres of land, and he has 
made various improvements since he became 
the owner. lie carries on general farming, 
making hay, sweet corn, potatoes, and fruit his 
principal products, also engaging in stock 
raising; and besides attending to his farm 
interests he still continues in the manufacture 
n| axe handles. 

On November 19, 1863, he married Miss 
Harriett Spiller, who was bom in Raymond 
mi October 6, 1S47, and is a daughter of John 
and Polly (Shout) Spiller. They have had 
three children: John Chester Tripp, born Sep- 
tember 14, 1S65, died December 28, 1883; 
Eda I., born December 17, 1871, now the wife 
of Clarence Winslow, a trader and Postmaster 
of Webb's Mills; and Ilamden, born Novem- 
ber 14, 1873, a carriage and sign painter by 
vocation, living in Westbrook, Me., who mar- 
ried Miss Ada M. Jordan. 

Although in his early manhood Mr. Tripp 
voted with the Democratic party, he has for 
many years been a stanch Republican. Fra- 



ternally, he is a member of Tyrian Lodge, 
No. y^,, A. F. & A. M., of Mechanic Falls, 
and Manomi Lodge, No. 40, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of the same place 
He and Mrs. Tripp are valued members of the 
Free Baptist Church of Casco, taking an active 
interest in church work. 

Mrs. Mary A. Nash, the widow of Simeon 
Nash, the former owner of Mr. Tripp's farm, 
is now a member of the latter's household. 
Her parents were George and Fannie (Nason) 
Abbott, natives of Portsmouth, N. 1 1 , from 
which place they came to Portland in 1805. 
Her father was a rope-maker by trade, and 
followed that vocation throughout his life. 
He died in Portland in 1 S 1 6 , and his wife in 
1856. They had seven children — George \V. , 
Abigail H., Elizabeth M., Mary Ann, Will- 
iam, Alice, and Lucy J. — all of whom are now 
dead with the exception of Mary Ann, who was 
born in Portland on December 1, 18 10. She 
has been twice married. Her first husband, 
Silas Moses, was born in Scarboro, Me., Jan- 
uary 16, 1792. His grandfather, Nathaniel 
Moses, was born in England, whence he emi- 
grated to this country in the early part of the 
eighteenth century, and settled in Scarboro, 
Me. Nathaniel Moses, Jr., father of Silas, 
was born in Scarboro, Me., October 13, 1758. 
His occupation through life was that of a 
farmer and shoemaker. Silas Muses also fol- 
lowed farming and shoemaking with success. 
He died on July 12, 1864. On January 1, 
1865, his widow, Mary A. Moses, became the 
second wife of Simeon Nash, of Raymond, who 
was a stining and enterprising farmer and a 
man held in high esteem by those with whom 
he came in contact in business dealings and 
social intercourse. It was he who brought 
the Nash farm into a state of cultivation, being 
the fust tu settle thereon. He died on Janu- 
ary 27, 1883. He had two sons by his first 
wife, namely: Franklin, a farmer (deceased), 
who married Miss Emeline Nash, now a resi- 
dent of West Roxbury, Mass. ; and David, a 
tailor by trade, who was in town business 
several years, and went once as Representative, 
and who died in 1876. Mr. and Mrs. Nash 
were both honored members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and took an active part in 
the work of that body. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



83 




NDREW LEIGHTON, present Com- 
mander of W. L. Haskell Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, is a retired 
produce dealer and a well-known 
farmer of Yarmouth, Me. lie was born in 
Pittsfield, Somerset County, Me., February 
28, 1824, son of James and Prudence (Blanch- 
ard) Leighton. The family is of English 
origin not very remote, Mr. Leighton's great- 
grandfather having- emigrated from England to 
America and become one of the early settlers 
in Cumberland County. Andrew Leighton, 
Mr. Leighton's grandfather, was a native and 
lifelong resident of the town of Cumberland in 
this county. He was prominently identified 
with the early growth of the place, ami built 
the county road from Falmouth to Portland, 
lie built and conducted the old Leighton 
tavern which is still standing in West Cum- 
berland, and is now in the family's possession, 
lie was an enterprising, public-spirited man. 
In politics he was a Democrat and in his relig- 
ious faith a Methodist. He died at the age of 
seventy, and his wife lived to reach the age of 
eighty years. They reared a family of ten 
sons and two daughters, as follows: William, 
Vises, Joseph, Andrew, Daniel, James, 
Ezekiel, Nicholas, Stephen, Robert, Lovey, 
and Massa. Joseph and Andrew were lost at 
sea in ' the privateer "Dash" in 1812, on 
George's Banks, it is supposed. 

James Leighton, Mr. Leighton's lather, was 
bom in Cumberland in 17S8, and served as a 
soldier in the War of 1812. In early man- 
hood he bought a farm of three hundred acres 
situated in the town of Pittsfield, Me., where 
he resided for twelve years. Then, disposing 
of his Pittsfield property, he moved to Upper 
Stillwater, in the town of Orono, and there 
engaged successfully in lumbering and operat- 
ing a saw-mill. At the end of five years he 
returned to Cumberland, and, purchasing a 
grist-mill, continued to carry it on for the rest 
of his life. He died at the age of forty-eight 
years. His wife, Prudence Blanchard, who 
was born in Cumberland in January, 1S01, 
became the mother of ten children, four of 
whom are living, namely: Andrew, the sub- 
ject of this sketch, who is the eldest; James 
M., whose home is in Cumberland; Enos; and 
Joseph, a resident of California. The others 



were: Charles J., Christian, Loemma, Fran- 
cis, Roxanna, and Margaret. The mother 

lived to reach the age of seventy-lour years. 
Mr. Leighton's parents were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and his father 
was a Whig in politics. 

Andrew Leighton passed his boyhood in 
Pittsfield, Cumberland, and Yarmouth; and 
he received his education in the district 
schools. At the age of twelve years he wenl 
to live with his grandfather Blanchard in Cum- 
berland Centre, and when eighteen years old 
began to work as a farm hand, receiving ten 
dollars per month. He saved his earnings; 
and five years later, in 1847, he settled upon 
his present farm, which originally contained 
thirty-five acres, and has been increased by 
later purchase to sixty-four acres. Mr. Leigh- 
ton has made various improvements in the 
property, and in connection with farming he 
did a prosperous business as a dealer in pressed 
hay and produce for many years. Some time 
since, he retired from that business in favor of 
his son, who now carries it on ; and he devotes 
his attention to the cultivation of his farm. 

In 1862 Mr. Leighton enlisted as a private 
in Company E, Seventeenth Regiment, Maine 
Volunteers, under Captain Ellis M. Sawyer, and 
served until the close of the Civil War, taking 
part in several important engagements, includ- 
ing the battles of Fredericksburg, Cedar Creek, 
where he was severely wounded, Chancellors- 
ville, and Fort Stephens. He was disabled at 
Chancellorsville, anil was in the Convalescent 
Corps for six months, from which he was 
transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps, and 
later to Company C, Sixth Regiment. He- 
was made Corporal of the company, but acted 
as Orderly Sergeant until mustered out on 
July 8, 1865. He is now prominent in Grand 
Army circles, as above noted. Mr. Leighton 
supports the Republican party in politics, and 
in 1869 and 1870 he ably represented his dis- 
trict in the legislature. 

On January 16, 185 1, Mr. Leighton was 
united in marriage with Ruth Etta Purvcs, 
who was born in Cumberland, August 20, 
1829. Her parents, Adam and Ruth Purves, 
were old residents of Cumberland, whose an- 
cestors were of Scotch origin. Mr. and Mrs. 
Leighton have had four children, namely: 



84 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Fred \V. , who is engaged in the hay and prod- 
uce business in Yarmouth; Ella Frances, who 
died at the age of twenty-four years; Mary 
Etta, who resides at home; and Hattie F., who 
married John E. Baker, and lives in West 
1 Jeering. Mr. Leighton and his family are 
members of the Congregational church. 




,1-IARLES JOHNSON, formerly a 
prosperous agriculturist of Gorham, 
Me., spent his entire life here, his 
birth having occurred September 
30, 1824, and his death April 7, 1895. His 
father, Thomas J., and his grandfather, 
Matthew Johnson, were both natives of Gor- 
ham, coming from English antecedents. Mat- 
thew Johnson was an extensive farmer and a 
respected citizen of the community. He mar- 
ried a cousin, Hannah Johnson, who bore him 
five children. He and his wife were active in 
religious work, being members of the Meth- 
odist church. 

Thomas Johnson was born October 5, 1790, 
and lived to a venerable age, passing away 
April _•<), [869. He was a tiller of the soil, 
engaging in his chosen calling with perse- 
vering industry. He was twice married. On 
March 14, 1814, he married Mary, daughter of 
Joseph Hamblin, of Gorham; and she died 
April 16, 1830, leaving three children, the 
youngest being Charles, the special subject of 
this sketch. His second wife was Dorothy, 
daughter of Edward and Betsey Libby. She 
lived until December 14, 1864. The only 
child of the second marriage was Mary M., 
who married Dr. A. R. P. Meserve, of Port- 
land, and has one child, Lucian Meserve. 

Charles Johnson was reared in the town of 
his birth, and, like his forefathers, engaged in 
farming. In 1857 he bought a farm of one 
hundred acres, the most of which he placed 
under cultivation, rendering it one of the most 
valuable estates in the neighborhood. A man 
of sterling qualities, upright in all his ways, 
possessing good financial and executive 
ability, he was held in high esteem, and was 
prominent in town affairs. He served as Se- 
lectman two years and as Town Collector, 
being ever loyal to his trusts. In politics he 
was a strong adherent of the Republican party. 



Socially, he was a Mason, belonging to Har- 
mony Lodge of Gorham. 

On January 2, 1854, Mr. Johnson was 
united in marriage with Martha, daughter of 
Ai and Elizabeth (Files) Libby, of Gorham. 
Of this union two children were born — Her- 
bert A. and Edward C, neither of whom is 
now living. Herbert, who died in 1887, mar- 
ried Mary E. Sawyer, to whom he left two 
children — Eleanor and Effie. Edward, the 
youngest son, died early at Orono in 1858. 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnson adopted a daughter, Julia 
H. Johnson, taking her when she was but two 
years of age, and bringing her up as carefully 
and tenderly as though she were their own 
Mrs. Johnson is a worthy member of the 
odist church, to which her husband 
belonged. 



eth- 

also 



/Urs. 



EORGE HENRY LIBBY, City Treas- 
\ '*) I urer of Portland, was born at Bruns- 
wick, this State, August 20, 1841. 
He is the worthy representative of one of the 
earliest families who settled Cumberland 
County, being descended from John and Sarah 
Libby, who located at Scarboro in 1630. 
Many of the descendants of this family have 
since spent their lives within a radius of fif- 
teen miles from Portland's city buildings. 
The line was continued successively by their 
son Eleaner; by his son David, who was born 
in 1657; by Samuel, first, who was born in 
1690; by Samuel, second, born in 1714; 
and by Samuel, third, born December [7, 
1759, who was the great-grandfather of George 
II. Libby. Samuel, third, was a soldier in 
the Revolutionary War, and lived many years 
thereafter, dying March 18, 1S19. Fl is son 
Caleb, George's grandfather, was born August 
J 9i 1 7^3' at Scarboro, and died in 1838. 
Caleb, who was a stevedore by occupation, 
served as Sergeant of his company in the 
War of 18 1 2. He spent a large part of his 
life in Portland; and here his son, John W. 
Libby, father of George H., was born May 15, 
1816. 

John W. Libby was reared to maturity in 
his native city. He there learned the trade 
of edge-tool maker, at which he became an ex- 
pert, winning a reputation as one of the most 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



»5 



skilful of workmen at his handicraft. A few 
years of his life were passed in Brunswick. 
He returned to Portland about three years 
after his marriage, and at 21 Hanover Street 
built the house in which he resided until his 
death, March 9, 18S5. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Jane R. Bolton, was a na- 
tive of Portland, born in December, 1819. 
Of their family two children grew to matu- 
rity; namely, George Henry and Sarah A. 
The latter, who was born February 7, 1844, is 
the wife of the Rev. C. V. Hanson, D.D., of 
Skowhegan, Me. 

George Henry Libby was less than three 
years old when his parents returned to this 
city. He acquired his education in the com- 
mon schools of Portland. Poor health obliged 
him to relinquish the advantage of a more ad- 
vanced course. In 1856 he began his busi- 
ness career, engaging in the grocery trade on 
Commercial Street with T. & W. H. Shaw. 
I laving remained three years with that firm, 
he worked as clerk in the retail grocery store 
of Robert F. Green for another year, after 
which he was employed at the dyer's trade 
with Brad Foster until the breaking out of the 
Rebellion. In November, 1861, Mr. Libby, 
who inherited the patriotic ardor of his ances- 
tors, enlisted for the war in Company A, 
Twelfth Maine Volunteer Infantry, and with 
his regiment joined the army at the Gulf. He 
was present at New -Orleans and at the siege of 
Port Hudson, where in the first assault, May 
27, 1863, he lost his left hand. He was sent 
directly to the hospital at Baton Rouge, where 
on account of disability he was discharged Sep- 
tember 12, 1863. Returning home, Mr. Libby 
was engaged for a time as book-keeper for 
C. H. Stewart & Co., stove dealers. After- 
ward he was employed in similar positions by 
T. K. Stewart and W. H. Stewart, both build- 
ing firms. He subsequently secured a clerk- 
ship in the examining office of the Provost 
Marshal, and from February I, 1865, until 
the close of the war was recruiting officer for 
the city. Being then offered a position in 
the office of the City Treasurer, Mr. Libby 
accepted, and has since been employed in that 
department, proving himself an efficient and 
trustworthy servant of the city. On the death 
of Mr. Hersey, which occurred in March, 



1890, Mr. Libby accepted the proffer of the 
office of City Treasurer and Collector, and was 
installed April 1, 1890. After two years ol 
service, the city administration fell into tin 
hands of the Democratic party: but two years 
later Mr. Libby was re-elected to the Trea 
urership for a second term. He is now the 
oldest city official in point of service at tin 
same time that he is one of the most highly re- 
spected. He holds other important offices, 
among which is that of Treasurer of the 
Diamond Island Association, of which he was 
one of the originators. 

In the fraternal organizations of Portland 
Mr. Libby is quite influential. He was one 
of the organizers of Brumhall Lodge, No. 3, 
Knights of Pythias, and a charter member of 
Montjoy Lodge, No. 6, and is now Past 
Chancellor of both Lodges. He is likewise 
a member of the Grand Lodge, having been 
Grand Master of Exchequer. He has also con- 
nection with Unity Lodge, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and belongs to Bosworth 
Post, No. 2, Grand Army of the Republic, 
having joined it in March, 1868. On January 
1, 1868, Mr. Libby married Emma Charlotte, 
daughter of James Nutter, a pioneer settler ol 
Trescott, Me., to which he came in 1S00. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Libby attend the Chestnut 
Street Methodist Episcopal Church, Mrs. 
Libby being an esteemed member of that or- 
ganization. Their pleasant home is situated 
at 291 Spring Street, one of the attractive 
parts of this beautiful city. 



/^ARDNER B. WILEY, a prosperous 
\ .3 I farmer of Naples and a veteran of the 

Civil War, is numbered among the 
most worthy and substantial citizens of this 
town, having successfully cultivated his pres- 
ent farm since 1868. He was born in Stow, 
Oxford County, Me., September 30, 1841, son 
of Elbridge and Lucy M. (Webb) Wiley. His 
father was a thoroughly practical ami ener- 
getic farmer, who made the best use of his 
opportunities in life. He and his wife reared 
a family of six children, four sons and two 
daughters; and it is worthy of note that all of 
the sons served through the Civil War, and 
are still living, the eldest having enrolled 



S6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



himself at the age of twenty -seven, and the 
youngest, who is Gardner B., the subject of 
this sketch, entering the ranks at twenty-one. 
Gardner B. Wiley received his education in 
the schools of his native town, and gave his 
attention to farming at an early age. He was 
engaged in the usual routine of farm labor at 
the breaking out of the war; but the stirring 
scenes of the times and the general trend of 
events aroused his patriotism to such a degree 
that all other things were thrown aside, and, 
following the example of his elder brothers, 
he volunteered his services in defence of the 
Union, enlisting in 1862 as a private in Com- 
pany B, Seventeenth Maine Volunteers, and 
serving with that regiment, with the excep- 
tion of a short interval, until the close of the 
struggle. The Seventeenth has an unusually 
brilliant record for continued active service; 
and Mr. Wiley participated in many important 
and decisive battles, among which were those 
of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Locust 
Grove, Mine Run, Gettysburg, the battle of 
the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna 
River, Cold Harbor, and the siege of Peters- 
burg. At the battle of Petersburg, June 16, 
1S64, he was severely wounded in the left arm 
and side by a minie ball; and from the field 
hospital he was transferred to the hospital at 
Portsmouth Grove, R.I., where he remained 
for three months. After a short time spent in 
Massachusetts he rejoined his regiment in 
front of Petersburg, serving until the close of 
the war and being discharged with the rank of 
Corporal. Returning to Stow, he remained 
there until 1868, at which time he moved to 
Naples, and one year later settled upon his 
present farm. His property consists of one 
hundred and seventy-five acres of fertile land, 
which is well located and finely improved; and 
here he is pleasantly and profitably occupied 
in general farming, keeping well up in the line 
of progress and taking high rank among the 
able and thrifty farmers of his section. 

In May, 1868, Mr. Wiley was united in 
marriage to Lucy M. Chaplin, and has had 
eight children, as follows: Bennett S. ; George 
W., who is no longer living; Rosina; Joseph 
II.; Florence V.; Rubira 1-:.; Mary L. ; and 
Elbridge ( J. 

In politics Mr. Wiley votes with the Re- 



publican party, and he is a comrade of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. 



•STlc 



EORGE W. TAYLOR, superintend- 
\ '*) I ent of a woollen-mill at Windham, 
^— *" Cumberland County, Me., was born 
in the town of Dexter, Penobscot County, July 
2, 1859, son of George and Helen (Henderson) 
Taylor. He is of English descent, both his 
father and his grandfather, David Taylor, hav- 
ing been natives of Meltham, Yorkshire, Eng- 
land. There the latter spent his threescore 
years of life, his trade being that of a woollen 
manufacturer. George was the second son 
born to him and his wife, whose maiden name 
was Elizabeth. 

George Taylor was born in March, 1S23. 
He began working in the mills when a lad, 
learning the weaver's trade; and in 1846 he 
emigrated to New England, locating in Woon- 
socket, R.I., where he remained five years, 
being employed as boss weaver in the Harris 
mills. Going thence to Amesbury, Mass., 
he occupied the same position for four years 
in the Salisbury mills, and was next engaged 
as superintendent of the Dexter woollen-mills 
at Dexter, this State, continuing until i860. 
Forming a partnership with William F. 
Perry, under the name of Taylor & Perry, he 
then went to Bridgton, Me., where they 
erected a mill with a capacity of three sets, 
ami began manufacturing woollen goods, meet- 
ing with such profitable results that the mill 
had to be increased to twice its original capac- 
ity. This business he continued until his 
demise, November I, 187S. In politics he 
affiliated with the Republican party, and was 
epiite prominent in local matters, being ever 
interested in promoting the cause of education, 
and was one of the three committees under 
whose administration the first high school of 
Bridgton was built. In 1877 he was elected 
as Representative to the State legislature, and 
served one term, and was re-elected in 1878, 
but passed away before the legislature con- 
vened. Socially, he was an Odd Fellow and 
a Mason, belonging, as a Knight Templar, 
to St. Albans Commandery of Portland. Re- 
ligiously, he was a believer in the tenets of 
the Methodist church. To him and his wife 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



87 



five children were born, but three of whom are 
now living — George W., Walter H., and Evie 
M. DeGroot. 

George W. Taylor attended the Bridgton 
High School, and afterward took a course at 
Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College in 
Boston, Mass. Returning to Bridgton, he 
was book-keeper at the Pondicherry mills for 
three years, but subsequently removed to Port- 
land, where he had charge of the woollen de- 
partment in the dry-goods store of Twitchell, 
Chapman & Co. for two years. Going then 
to Boston, Mr. Taylor was at work there four 
years, being one-half of the time with the New 
York and Boston Manufacturing Company, and 
the other half with the Massachusetts Mutual 
Accident Insurance Company. The follow- 
ing year he was employed as a wool sorter in 
the Pondicherry mills at Bridgton, afterward 
being similarly employed in the Wooumbo 
mills at Lisbon Falls, Me., for six months. 
In 1873 Mr. Taylor became connected once 
more with the Pondicherry mills, remaining 
with the company until 1894, being first book- 
keeper, then assistant superintendent, and 
finally being promoted to the responsible 
office of superintendent of the mills. In 1894 
he came to Windham, accepting his present 
position, which he has since ably and faith- 
fully filled. 

Mr. Taylor was married in 1882 to Miss 
Li 11a L., daughter of B. F. Jewell, of Sebago, 
Me. Their union has been blessed by the ad- 
vent of six children, five of whom are living; 
namely, Adra B., Leah M. , Beulah E., 
Walter R., and Helen. In politics Mr. Tay- 
lor is identified with the Republican party. 
His religious views coincide with the creed of 
the Methodist church. Socially, he is a mem- 
ber of Red Men Lodge, No. 36, Nagwamqueeg 
Tribe. 




|DWIN T. MAYBERRY, Postmaster of 
Westbrook, was born in Windham, 
Me., April 11, 1S66, son of Nelson 
and Elizabeth (Bodge) Maybcrry. His grand- 
father, Daniel Mayberry, was an industrious 
farmer of Windham, where he passed a greater 
part of his life, being prominently identified 
with the public affairs of the town and at one 



time a member of the Board of Selectmen. 
In politics he supported the Republican party, 
and in his religious views he was a Universal- 
ist. He died at his home in Windham in 
1 8 8 1 , and of his three children only one is now 
living. 

Nelson Mayberry, father of Edwin T., was 
born in Windham, Me., in 1839. I' 1 -' re " 
eeived his education in the schools of his na- 
tive town and at Oxford Academy, and, having 
learned the carpenter's trade, subsequently 
settled in Cumberland Mills, where, besides 
following his regular occupation, he became 
well known as a musician, devoting much time 
to playing at concerts and social gatherings in 
his locality; and for many years his ability 
in that direction caused his services to be in 
great demand. He was a member of West- 
brook Commandery, No. 209, Order of the 
Golden Cross. In politics he voted with the 
Republican party, and in his religious views 
he was liberal. His wife, Elizabeth Bodge, 
became the mother of three children, namely: 
Frances E., who resides in Hoosick Falls, 
N.Y.; Willard B., who is now living in the 
State of Virginia; and Edwin T., the special 
subject of this sketch. 

Edwin T. Mayberry acquired the elements 
of learning in the public schools of Windham 
and at the Westbrook High School. He then 
entered the drug store of H. G. Starr at Cum- 
berland Mills, where he obtained a fair knowl- 
edge of pharmacy. From there he went to 
Chelsea as a clerk, and two years later to New 
York City, where he engaged in the drug busi- 
ness with his brother under the firm name of 
Mayberry Brothers. He remained in the 
metropolis for two years, at the end of which 
time he sold his interest in the business, and 
returning to Westbrook engaged with his 
father-in-law in the manufacture of furniture 
under the firm name of the New England Fur- 
niture Company. He continued in that enter- 
prise until April 8, 1895, at which time he 
was appointed Postmaster of Westbrook, a 
position which he is well qualified to fill, both 
by reason of his business ability and naturally 
agreeable manners; and since taking charge of 
the office he has won the good will and hearty 
approbation of his fellow-citizens, irrespective 
of politics. 



88 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mr. Mayberry married Helen G. Woodman, 
daughter of R. W. Woodman, of Fairfield, 
Me., and has two children, namely: Hattie E., 
who is now attending school; and J. Norman, 
aged two years. Socially, Mr. Mayberry is 
very popular, having been a member of the 
Star Lodge, No 155, Knights of Pythias, for 
the past nine years. In politics he is an ac- 
tive supporter of the Democratic party, and in 
his religious views he is a Universalist. 



OSEPH CARR WHITE, the genial and 

accommodating proprietor of the Preble 
I louse of Portland, Cumberland County, 
Me., was born in Cohasset, Mass., 
May 25, 1849, son °f William L. and Maria 
(Scott) White. His paternal grandfather, 
John L. White, was an innkeeper, being pro- 
prietor of a hotel in Boston during the early 
part of this century, as was also at a later 
period his son, William L. White, who (born 
in November, 1825) is now a resident of 
Bath, Me., being the Division Superintendent 
of the Maine Central Railroad. Mrs. William 
L White, who was born in 1827, was a daugh- 
ter of William Scott, a prominent business 
man of Newbury, Vt., owning and managing 
a large tannery in that town. She became 
the mother of three children — William S. ; 
Lucy M., wife of Captain Peter Kennedy; and 
Joseph C. 

Joseph C. White attended the public schools 
ol New Castle, Me., was graduated from Lin- 
coln Academy in that town and subsequently 
from Gray's Business College of Portland, re- 
ceiving his diploma in 1866. After a short 
experience as a clerk, in 1871 he purchased 
the Thorndike House in Rockland, Me., and 
was its proprietor for ten subsequent years. 
After a business digression he was engaged for 
some years in the sale of building materials 
in Providence, R.I., during which he returned 
to his favorite occupation, and managed a 
hotel in Leesburg, Fla., in the winter, and 
the Columbia Hotel at Saratoga Springs dur- 
ing the summer. In 1 891 he took charge of 
the Preble House in Portland, which under 
his management is one of the most popular 
hotels in the State. Mr. White is especially 
well fitted for his post, having gained much 



valuable experience during the exercise of his 
vocation in both North and South; and his 
pleasant manners and ready tact make him 
very popular as a host. On September 25, 
1877, Mr. White was united in marriage with 
Nellie, daughter of Michael A. and Mary 
(Ulmer) Achorn, of Rockland, Me. Three 
children have been born of their union — 
Helen, Bessie, and Arthur, the last named 
being no longer living. 

In politics Mr. White favors the Republi- 
can party. In society affiliations he belongs 
to Alma Lodge, No. 43, A. P. & A. M., of 
Damariscotta, Me. ; ami he is also a popular 
member of the Portland Athletic Club. 




ON. GEORGE WARREN. The 
Warren family has long been a 
prominent one in Cumberland 
County, its members having early 
identified themselves with the growth and de 
velopment of Westbrook and the neighboring 
towns. One of its representatives, who was 
long actively engaged in promoting the busi- 
ness interests of the locality, was the Hon. 
George Warren, the subject of this sketch, 
who died at his home in Westbrook, July 29, 
1S76. 

George Warren was born at the old Warren 
homestead in Falmouth, Me., now Westbrook, 
October 6, 1S11, and was a son of John and 
Eleanor (Lamb) Warren. Mr. Warren's 
grandfather, John Warren, Sr. , was a native 
of North Berwick, Me., where his birth took 
place March 5, 1731. When a young man he 
settled in Falmouth, an estate located on the 
road leading from Saccarappa to Stroudwater, 
which lias since become a part of Westbrook. 
He filled a position of prominence and useful- 
ness in the community, possessing the esteem 
and good will of his fellow-men; and he lived 
many years. His wife, Jane Johnson, who 
was born in Falmouth in 1740, also reached a 
ripe old age. They were the parents of twelve 
children, as follows: John (first), who dieil 
while serving as a soldier in the Revolution- 
ary War; Polly; David; Elizabeth; Sally; 
James; Jane; Margaret; John (second); Rob- 
ert ; Nathaniel ; and Nancy. 

John Warren, fourth son of John Warren, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



89 



Sr.,"was born at the homestead,- May 23, 1776, 
a memorable date in the family's history, as 
it signalized the death of his elder brother, 
John (first), whose name lie was called to bear, 
as if to fill that brother's place in the family 
circle. John Warren entered mercantile pur- 
suits when a young man, later engaging in the 
lumber business, which he established and 
developed into an extensive enterprize. He 
followed that industry successfully during the 
rest of his business life, which was character- 
ized by a firm adherence to principles of in- 
tegrity; and it is pleasing to note that his 
descendants have maintained the record inau- 
gurated by their predecessor. He died at the 
homestead in Westbrook, September 10, 1845. 
His wife, Eleanor Lamb, whom he married 
November 29, 18 10, was born in Falmouth, 
July 5, 1785, and died on January 13, 1835. 
She became the mother of three sons, namely : 
George, the subject of this sketch; William 
L. ; and Lewis P. 

George Warren in his early years received 
a careful home training, and acquired his ele- 
mentary education in the schools of his native 
town, afterward profiting by more advanced 
courses of study at Bridgton, Gardiner, and 
other places. When but a boy he began to be 
of service to his father, and before he was 
twenty-one he went into mercantile business 
with I!. M. Edwards, opening a general store 
in Westbrook, and for some years conducting 
a thriving trade. After his father's death, in 
addition to his large share in the extensive 
lumber manufacturing industry which had been 
built up by his father and uncle, Mr. Warren 
and his younger brother Lewis were engaged 
with other parties in the manufacture of 
weavers' harnesses, wire, and moccasins. In 
1876 he took the initial steps in starting a 
new enterprise. He was one of the Directors 
of the Portland & Rochester Railroad. 

Mr. Warren was an active supporter of Re- 
publican principles, contributing toward the 
success of that party in his locality; and his 
career as a member of the Maine legislature 
was marked by a vigorous and progressive 
policy in the management of public business 
and a careful foresight for the best interests of 
his district. His political services were of a 
nature which inspired confidence beyond the 



limits of his party, thus giving him a broad 
influence in State politics; and from his useful 
career in the House of Representatives he 
was called by Governor Connor to serve as a 
member of his Council, a position which he 
held at the time of his death at the date above 
named, now about twenty years since. 

Mr. Warren and Catherine B. Palmer, 
daughter of Joseph Palmer, of Hampton, N.I I., 
were married in 1841, and they had seven 
children, four of whom are living, namely: 
William L., born in 1843, who was formerly 
a member of the Maine legislature and is now 
residing in California; George L. , born in 
1847, who is engaged in the gentlemen's fur- 
nishing business in Portland; Ellen L., born 
in 1845, who married H. Mayhew, and is now 
residing with her mother; and Fred E., born 
in 1864, who is in business with his brother 
in Portland. George L. Warren, who is con- 
ducting a successful business in Portland, has 
two children, namely: George William, born 
in 1876, who is now a medical student at 
Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md. ; 
and Philip E. , born in 1884, who is attending 
the Butler School in Portland. 

Mr. Warren was held in high estimation 
both in business and social circles. He was 
a member of Temple Lodge, No. 86, A. F. & 
A. M., in which he held all the important 
offices. On religious questions, as on others, 
he was accustomed to think for himself, being 
always able and willing to state clearly the 
reason for his belief; and, while not accepting 
the common orthodox views on many points oi 
doctrine, was a constant attendant at public 
worship. 

Mrs. Warren, who still resides at the home- 
stead in Westbrook, is loved and respected by 
a large number of friends and acquaintances. 



/®TS 



EORGE T. DYER, for many years 
VI^T intimately associated with the agri- 
^-^~ cultural interests of Cape Elizabeth, 
having been one of the most industrious and 
enterprising farmers of the place, now oc- 
cupies the house in which his birth occurred 
on July 1, 18 1 8. His ancestors for several 
generations have lived in this locality, his 



9° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



grandparents, Nathaniel and Abigail (Hig- 
gins) Dyer, having spent their lives here. 
The grandfather followed the sea for a brief 
period, but after his marriage engaged in till- 
ing the soil, and established a good home- 
Mead. He and his wife reared eight children, 
Jonah, father of George T. , being the first- 
born. Jonah spent a short time in nautical 
pursuits, but subsequently followed in the 
footsteps of his father and grandfather, becom- 
ing one of the substantial farmers of the Cape. 
In 1816 he married Elizabeth Roberts, who 
bore him nine children, three of whom are still 
living, namely: George T., the eldest child; 
Irene M., wife of William 13. Higgins, of this 
town; and Nathaniel, who married Amanda 
Carpenter, of the Cape, and has five children 
— Sumner, Clara, Emma, Alice, and Fanny. 

George T. Dyer, like most farmers' sons, 
received a common-school education, and spent 
his early years in performing the necessary 
chores incident to agricultural life. Being 
reared to habits of industry and economy, he 
has made a success of farming, to which he 
settled on reaching years of maturity, pur- 
chasing a farm on the Cape, where he labored 
with persevering industry for many years. He 
now occupies the old homestead on which his 
boyhood days were spent, enjoying the fruits 
of his earlier years of toil. 

On December 28, 1848, Mr. Dyer was 
united in marriage with Miss Elmira Dyer, 
a daughter of James Dyer, of Cape Elizabeth; 
and into their happy household thus estab- 
lished three children were born, two of whom, 
with their mother, have passed away, Mrs. 
Dyer departing this life March 15, 1892, at 
the age of seventy-six years. The only child 
living is George A. Dyer, who lives with his 
father and carefully manages the homestead 
property, being an able and skilful farmer. 
He was born November 15, 1853, and in 1882, 
on the 25th of February, was united in mar- 
riage with Estelle E. Hartford, the daughter 
of Henry H. Hartford, of Denmark, Me. 
Their union has been blessed by the advent of 
three children, namely: Myra Mae, born No- 
vember 7, 1887; Clarence Albert, born No- 
vember 11, 1891 ; and Ernest E., born May 4, 
18S5. Politically, Mr. George T. Dyer has 
ever been a stanch advocate of Democratic 



principles; and religiously he is an esteemed 
member of the Free Baptist church. 



OI IN SOULE, who during his busy life 
occupied a prominent position among 
the well-to-do farmers of Freeport, 
Cumberland County, was born in that 
town in 1798. It is now difficult to gather 
any particulars in regard to his ancestors, 
owing to the lack of authentic records; but it 
is known that his father was an early settler 
of Freeport, where he cleared ami improved 
a tract of wild land and became a prosperous 
farmer. 

John Soule received his education in the 
schools of Freeport, and was reared to an agri- 
cultural life. In early manhood he learned 
the trade of a brick-maker, which he later re- 
linquished for agricultural pursuits, settling 
upon a farm adjoining the present residence of 
his widow, and becoming one of the thriving 
and representative farmers of the locality. He 
was widely and favorably known as a worthy 
and industrious man and useful citizen. He 
died at his home in Freeport in 1868, aged 
seventy years. In religious affiliation he was 
a member of the Congregational church, and 
in politics he supported the Republican party 
after its formation. He was twice married. 
His first wife, whose maiden name was Mary 
Mitchell, was a representative of the old 
Mitchell family of Yarmouth. She died leav- 
ing six sons, three of whom — Horatio D. , 
Herbert, and Charles P. — are still living, 
being residents of Yarmouth. In 1854 Mr. 
Soule wedded for his second wife Miss Sarah 
Mason, who survives him. 

Sarah (Mason) Soule was born in Yarmouth, 
February 5, 18 14, a daughter of Joseph and 
Lusanna (Baker) Mason. She is a representa- 
tive of a family prominent among the pioneers 
of this county, members of which have been 
closely identified with the development and 
material prosperity of Yarmouth. Her great- 
grandfather, who was of English descent, was 
an early settler in Yarmouth; and her grand- 
father, John Mason, who was a man widely 
known and highly esteemed for his many ad- 
mirable traits of character, was a native as 
well as lifelong resident of that town. 




JOHN SOULE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



93 



Joseph Mason, father of Mrs. Soule, was 
horn at the homestead in North Yarmouth, 
and at an early age commenced to follow the 
sea. He advanced rapidly in his calling, 
soon becoming a master mariner, and was a 
noted man among the pioneer ship-masters of 
Yarmouth. After a long and varied expe- 
rience afloat he finally retired, and, settling 
upon a farm in his native town, followed agri- 
culture during the rest of his active life, 
dying at the age of eighty-four years. He 
was a man of sound sense and energetic habits, 
keenly alive to all the duties of citizenship, 
and a good neighbor, being highly esteemed 
by his fellow-townsmen. He was a liberal 
supporter of the Congregational church in Yar- 
mouth. His wife, Lusanna, who was a native 
of Yarmouth, became the mother of nine chil- 
dren, of whom Mrs. Soule is the only one now 
living. She lived to reach the venerable age 
of eighty-seven years, leaving the fragrant 
memory of a long life spent in the faithful 
performance of the dutes of wife and mother. 
Mrs. Sarah M. Soule still resides in the vicin- 
ity of her birthplace, and is unusually bright 
and active for one of her years. She is one 
of the oldest members of the Congregational 
church, having united with it in 1840; and 
she is among the few old residents who still 
survive as specimens of the strong and vig- 
orous manhood and womanhood of former days. 

A portrait of her husband, John Soule, ap- 
pears in this connection as that of a faithful 
toiler who did his part in developing the re- 
sources of this county before the present gen- 
eration had appeared on the scene. 




[OSES GREENLEAF PALMER, a 

retired merchant of Portland, Me., 
and a gentleman of various in- 
dustrial and monetary interests, 
was born in Norridgewock, Me., September 
19, 1822. His father was John Palmer, and 
his paternal grandfather William Palmer, who 
removed to Norridgewock from Hallowell. 

John Palmer was a native of Hallowell. 
He was born November 22, 1790; and he re- 
ceived his education in the district schools. 
In his early youth he removed to Castine, and 
at twenty-two years of age enlisted as a soldier 



in the War of 1812. When the war was over, 
he migrated to Norridgewock, and there for 
some years he followed the toilsome but peace- 
ful life of a farmer. In 1827 he moved to 
Athens, Somerset County, Me., where he 
opened a village hotel; but after two years he 
changed the scene of his enterprise to Corn- 
ville, buying a farm, and managing it in con- 
nection with the country hotel that he opened 
in the vicinity, cleverly furnishing the supply 
for his own demand. After carrying on this 
twofold business for a number of years, he sold 
out his interests at Cornville, and removed to 
Waterville, where he purchased a farm, on 
which he passed his remaining years. His 
wife was Miss Betsey Nichols, a daughter 
of Nathaniel Nichols, of Monmouth. The 
children born of their marriage were: Sumner 
C. ; Moses Greenleaf; Louisa M., wife of 
L. P. Faught, of Sidney; Emily P., wife of 
Josiah Tilton, of Cornville; Anne E. , who 
died at twenty-four years of age; Susan M., 
wife of N. B. Dalton, of Readfield; and 
Henry M., who died shortly after completing 
his majority. 

Moses Greenleaf Palmer, the second born of 
his parents, was educated in the district 
schools of his native town and in Bloomfield 
Academy. At seventeen years of age he 
stepped from the student's desk into the rank 
and file of armed soldiery, for it was in this 
year that the Aroostook War was raging. 
The block-house still standing at Port Fair- 
field is a monument to the company in which 
he served. In 1848 he established himself in 
Foxboro, Mass., where, in connection with his 
elder brother, Sumner C, he became a manu- 
facturer and inventor. The enterprise estab- 
lished was a straw bonnet and hat factory; and 
Mr. Palmer's invention, which consisted of a 
plaster of Paris block instead of the hand- 
made wooden bonnet-block formerly used, soon 
became universally accepted by manufacturers, 
who saw at once that the reduced cost of the 
new blocks would greatly increase their 
profits. The sale of Palmer bonnet and hat 
blocks became so extensive that a ton of cal- 
cined plaster was consumed daily in producing 
a sufficient number to supply the demand. 

Six years later Mr. Moses G. Palmer re- 
turned to his native State, Maine, though he 



94 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



retained his interest in the bonnet and block 
factory. In 1841, or approximately that 
date, he opened the first wholesale millinery 
store ever established in the State of Maine, 
and succeeded in building up an extensive and 
profitable trade, from which he retired in 
1 86 1. In 1867 he disapproved the poet's 
statement that "it's all in the bonnet, and 
nothing in the shoe " ; for he then established a 
flourishing retail shoe house, which is still 
conducted under the firm name of the Palmer 
Shoe Company. 

Besides his mercantile ventures, inventions 
and manufactures, Mr. Palmer has been deeply 
interested in public enterprises. He was a 
charter member of the first horse railway 
company in Portland, of which corporation 
he was Treasurer, and in the construction and 
operation of which he was most active. While 
he was holding the position of Treasurer of 
the new road, the directors became dissatis- 
fied, and made complaint of what they termed 
his extravagant methods. The charges against 
him were that he was using an unnecessary 
amount of labor, a conductor and driver being 
considered more than was needed for one car, 
and the second horse a redundant force. A 
new manager was therefore appointed, and the 
road was conducted on a less expensive plan. 
The "superfluous" man and horse were dis- 
charged; and the "bob-tail" car, as it was 
called, was inaugurated in Portland. Three 
years later, however, Mr. Palmer had the sat- 
isfaction of seeing his own previously aban- 
doned methods again in operation, since which 
time the horse railway has been thoroughly 
successful. 

Mr. Palmer retired from active life in 1889, 
having now a deserved rest from his labors. 
In 1872 he was elected Treasurer of the Old 
Orchard Camp Meeting Association, a posi- 
tion he has held ever since with the exception 
of one year. Mr. Palmer displayed his usual 
business acumen in 1895, when he purchased 
a large portion of stock of the Second Na- 
tional Bank of his city, which was at that time 
in a precarious situation and bad repute. 
This stock was capitalized at one hundred thou- 
sand dollars; and at the next annual meeting 
a new Board of Directors was elected, by 
whose skilful management financial prosperity 



was restored, and the business was closed out 
to the First National Bank at a good profit. 
It was also through his instrumentality that 
the stock of the Maine Central Railroad, 
which was being sold at the low rate of two 
dollars and seventy-five cents per share, was 
elevated to its proper value. A new board, 
which included himself, was formed by his 
influence; and the improvement made by the 
new management has continued steadily. Mr. 
Palmer was the first to advocate and advise 
the introduction of electric light into Port- 
land. 

Mr. Moses Greenleaf Palmer married Miss 
Martha Jane Ayer, the daughter of the Rev. 
Philip Ayer, of Monmouth; and the issue of 
this union was three children: Fremont M., 
who died when he was twenty-nine years of 
age; George M., superintendent of agents — in 
Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts — 
of the New York Life Insurance Company , 
and Henry M., who died a little lad of twelve 
years. George M. Palmer married Miss 
Annie F. Lcighton, and has two children — 
Harry M. and Florence A. 

Mr. Moses G. Palmer is a member of Port- 
land Lodge, A. F. & A. M. and he is the 
only surviving member of the Board of Trus- 
tees who held office during the election of the 
Chestnut Street Methodist Episcopal Church 
edifice, upon the Building Committee of 
which he also served. In religious faith hus- 
band and wife are happily allied, both being 
affiliated with the church whose interests he 
has so faithfully served. Successful in busi- 
ness, active in public behalf, Mr. Palmer has 
won for himself the just reward which falls to 
individual effort and faithful citizenship. 




ILLIAM B. JORDAN, superintend 
ent of the At wood Lead Com- 
pany's works at South Portland, was 
born April 25, 1837, at Cape Elizabeth, this 
county, being a representative of one of the 
earliest families to settle in this section of the 
State. His paternal grandfather, Captain 
Ezekiel Jordan, Sr., who spent his entire life 
on the Cape, was a farmer in comfortable cir- 
cumstances, his homestead farm containing 
about two hundred acres of land, on which he 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



9S 



labored with unremitting toil. He married 
Mary Simonton ; and they reared five children, 
nf whom Ezekiel, Jr., the second son, was 
father of William 13. 

Ezekiel Jordan, Jr., was reared and educated 
at Cape Elizabeth. On leaving school, he 
learned the shoemaker's trade, which he subse- 
quently followed for many years, both at Tort- 
land and the Cape, winning an excellent repu- 
tation for expert workmanship. Mis wife, 
whose maiden name was Susan Libby, was a 
native of Gray, Me., and a daughter of Jere- 
miah Libby. She bore him nine children, 
four of whom are now living, namely: Francis 
resides in Chelsea, Mass. ; Mary, wife of Wal- 
ter Skillings, lives in South Portland; Will- 
iam B. ; and Lavina, the wife of Charles G. 
Fickett, nf this town. 

William B. Jordan acquired the elements of 
knowledge in the common schools of his native 
district, pursuing his studies both summer and 
winter. He first began work as an engineer 
for Mr. N. W. Low, with whom he remained 
five years. In 1862 he enlisted in the Union 
Army, in Company I, Twenty-fifth Maine Vol- 
unteer Infantry, being under the direct com- 
mand of Captain Ezekiel Westcott. He served 
for nine months in the army of the Potomac, 
being discharged at the expiration of his term 
of enlistment, July 10, 1863. On returning 
home,. Mr. Jordan accepted a position with the 
Atwood Lead Company, with which he has 
since been connected, having been appointed 
in 1872 superintendent of the works. He has 
also other business interests. In 1892 he en- 
gaged in the coal and wood business, opening 
an office near Vaughn's Bridge, in what is now 
South Portland, where he has built up a large 
local trade. 

Mr. Jordan has been twice married. His 
first wife, Annie R. French, to whom he was 
united August 2, 1 S69, passed away within 
a year, her death occurring April 19, 1870. 
On September 15, 1871, he was joined in wed- 
lock with Miss Annie H. Huston, a daughter 
of Nathan L. Huston, of this town. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jordan have three children living: Fred 
W. , who is in the hay and grain business in 
South Portland; Frank A. ; and Mollie S. In 
politics Mr. Jordan is a faithful adherent of 
the Democratic party, and, religiously, is a 



member of the Second Parish Congregational 
Church. Socially, he is identified with the 
Masons and Odd Fellows, belonging to Hiram 
Lodge, No. 1 So, A. F. & A.M., of South 
Portland, and to the Maine Lodge of Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows of Portland. Mr. 
Jordan is likewise a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, being connected with 
the Bosworth Post, No. 2. 



T^JDWIN CHAPIN MILLIKEN, of Port- 

R land, Pension Agent for the State of 
"^ — 1. 1 - Maine, was born in Bridgton, Cum- 
berland County, on February 28, 1851, son of 
Benjamin F. and Rebecca (Richardson) Milli- 
ken. His grandfather, Joseph Milliken, was 
born at Scarboro, where for many years he fol- 
lowed the trade of a boat builder. Owning a 
farm in that town, he also gave much attention 
to agricultural pursuits. A portion of his life 
was spent in the calling of sea captain. Near- 
ing the end of his days, he removed to Den- 
mark, Me., and made that place his home 
until his decease. 

Benjamin F. Milliken was a native of Scar- 
boro. He was but ten or twelve years old 
when his parents settled on a farm in Den- 
mark, now a portion of Bridgton, Me. About 
1S40, after his father's death, the family re- 
moved to Bridgton Centre, where he is living 
at the present time. For several years he 
followed the trades of tanner and currier, and 
at one time he was a manufacturer of wood- 
work. He was a Whig in political views until 
that party was succeeded by the Republican, 
of which he is an ardent adherent. His wife, 
a native of Denmark, was a daughter of John 
Richardson, who afterward made his home in 
Bridgton Centre. Edwin Chapin Milliken, 
named for the Rev. Edwin H. Chapin, of 
New York City, was the only child born of 
their union. His mother died when he was 
but two years old His father is a member of 
the Universalist church. 

Edwin Chapin Milliken received a good 
practical education in the common schools of 
Bridgton, Me. On March 25, 1S64, when but 
thirteen years of age, he enlisted in Company 
H, Thirty-second Maine Volunteer Infantry. 
His father enlisted at the same time and in 



9 6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the same company and regiment. Shortly 
after, the regiment joined the Army of the Po- 
tomac, as a part of the Second Brigade, Second 
Division of the Ninth Army Corps. Mr. Mil- 
liken served in the battles of the Wilderness, 
Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Gaines Mill, and 
Totopotomy Creek. On July 30 his regiment 
led the charge into the crater of the exploded 
mine, where the larger part of the men lost 
their lives. His next engagement, fought 
September 30 at Pegram farm near Peters- 
burg, was followed by that of Hatcher's Run 
and the South Side Railway combats. After 
that he was engaged in garrison duty at Fort 
Welch and Fort Davis, the latter being next 
in line to Fort Hell in front of Petersburg. 
On December 12, 1864, his regiment was 
united with the Thirty-first Maine, both being 
greatly reduced in numbers, and was thereafter 
known by the latter name. On April 2, 1865, 
he took part in the final capture of Petersburg, 
passing through that place in pursuit of Gen- 
eral Lee. On arriving at Nottoway Court- 
house, his regiment, with two others from 
their brigade, was detailed as guard escort to 
Sutherland Station for General Fwell, General 
DeHoe, and other rebel officers, besides eight 
thousand troops, all of whom General Sheri- 
dan had captured a few days previously. After 
doing this it started for the front and marched 
to Berksville Junction, twelve miles from Ap- 
pomattox, covering the entire distance in a 
surprisingly short time, and was present at the 
surrender of General Lee, and also at the re- 
ception of the news of the assassination of 
President Lincoln. Soon after, it returned to 
City Point and went thence by steamer to 
Alexandria, where it remained until the Grand 
Review at Washington, in which it partici- 
pated. On July 15, 1865, Mr. Milliken re- 
ceived his honorable discharge after seventeen 
months of service, much of which was spent 
in the thickest of the fight, and during which 
he carried the regular equipment, although at 
the time of his discharge he was but fourteen 
years and four months old. His father served 
by his side through it all. Soon after his 
return to Bridgton he began to learn the trade 
of loom fixer in a woollen-mill. In 1869 he 
accepted a position in Portland with F. & 
C. B. Nash, in the capacities of salesman and 



book-keeper, continuing in their employ until 
January, 1893, or but little less than a quarter- 
century. He was then appointed to the posi- 
tion he now holds, in which he has charge of 
the State pensions and has an office at Au- 
gusta. 

Mr. Milliken, always a supporter of Repub- 
lican principles, was elected Warden of Ward 
3 on the Republican ticket. The record ol 
his connection with various fraternal organiza- 
tions is of much interest. Since 1869 he has 
held a membership in Bosworth Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, of which he was chosen 
Sergeant Major in 1874, holding that position 
for four years. He then became Adjutant of 
the Post, and held that continuously till Janu- 
ary 1, 1896, when he was elected Commander. 
In February, 1887, he was appointed Assistant 
Adjutant-general of the Department of Maine, 
and held that office up to and including the 
year 1891. He was also a member of the 
National Council of Administration and 
Assistant Inspector - general, attending the 
National Encampments for many years. He 
is one of the few men who are members of 
Shepley Camp, Sons of Veterans, who are also 
veteran soldiers. For many years he was con- 
nected with the National Guard of the State as 
Second Lieutenant of Company B in the First 
Regiment, afterward with the rank of First 
Lieutenant and still later as Adjutant of the 
regiment, serving in that capacity until 18N7, 
when the pressure of other work forced him to 
resign. He is a member of Haddattah Lodge 
and Una Encampment, Independent Order ol 
Odd Fellows. The Machigonne Tribe of Red 
Men also claims him as a member. In the 
Knights of Pythias, Bramhall Lodge, he is 
Past Chancellor, obtaining that rank by a ser- 
vice of five and a half years as Keeper of 
Records and Seal. He is Grand Master of 
Exchequer, or Grand Treasurer, for the ninth 
consecutive term ; while during the past seven 
teen years he has acted as Secretary and Treas 
urer of the Endowment Rank. 

Mr. Milliken has been twice married. His 
first union was contracted with Miss Frances 
M. Furlong, of Portland, who bore him three 
children, of whom the only survivor is Alice 
G. Milliken, now residing at home. Mrs. 
Frances M. Milliken died in 187S. On the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



97 



second occasion Mr. Milliken was joined in 

marriage with Mrs. Phinelia H. (True) Sweet- 
ser, a daughter of Erastus and Olive True, of 
Portland, where the ceremony was performed 
March 4, 1SS5. Mr. Milliken and his wife 
are attendants of West Congregational Church. 
They reside in the pleasant home at 1033 Con- 
gress Street, purchased by him in September, 
1889. 



r^Y'XSON M. SHAW, a thrifty and enter- 
prising farmer of the town of Cumber- 
land, was born upon his present 
farm, September 1, 1836, son of 
John and Martha (Wilson) Shaw. His grand- 
father, Daniel Shaw, came to the town as a 
pioneer, before the advent of county roads, 
when the paths of communication between the 
settlements were indicated by blazed trees. 
He acquired a tract of wild land, which he 
cleared and improved into a good farm, estab- 
lishing a comfortable home for himself and 
family. He died upon the farm at the age of 
seventy-seven years, after being twice married 
and rearing a family of nine children. 

John Shaw, father of Nelson M., was born 
on the homestead, and earl)' trained to farm 
work. He succeeded to the ownership of the 
property, which he cultivated and further im- 
proved, and was known as a kind-hearted 
neighbor and a useful citizen. He died at 
the age of fifty-two years. His wife, Martha 
Wilson, who was a native of Falmouth, be- 
came the mother of two sons, who reached 
maturity, namely: Nelson M., the subject of 
this sketch; and Wilson, who died at the age 
of twenty-eight years. Mrs. John Shaw lived 
to the age of eighty-two. Both she and her 
husband were members of the Congregational 
church, and Mr. Shaw was a Republican in 
politics. 

Nelson M. Shaw received his education in 
the common and high schools of Cumberland, 
and adopted farming as his occupation. At 
his father's death he inherited the farm, 
which he has since cultivated with prosperous 
results. He has seventy-five acres of fruitful 
land; and he has devoted much time and 
energy to improving both the land and farm 
buildings, his present residence having been 



erected under his personal supervision. He 
has always supported the Republican party, 
and is prominent in local public affairs. He 
was a Selectman for ten years, during eight 
of which he presided as Chairman of the Board : 
and he has also been Auditor of Accounts 
for several years. 

On March 19, 1864, Mr. Shaw was united 
in marriage to A. Caroline Leighton, who 
was born in Cumberland, March 9, 1843, and 
has had seven children, namely: Howard L. : 
John M. ; Herbert N. ; Emma S. ; Ethel C. ; 
Martha E. ; and Angie M., who died at the 
age of twenty-two years. Mrs. Nelson M. 
Shaw died November 27, 1886. Mr. Shaw 
occupies a leading position among the well- 
to-do farmers of his locality, and is highly es- 
teemed both for his manly personal qualities 
and his useful public services. He is a Con- 
gregationalist in his religious views, ami in 
fraternal associations is a member of the Order 
of Red Men. 




ERBERT FRANCIS TWITCHFLL, 
M.D., one of the prominent younger 
physicians of Portland, was born in 
Bethel, Oxford County, November 
16, 1869, son of Alphin and Roxanna 
(Twitchell) Twitchell. He comes of an old 
New England family, the history of which is 
given at length in Lapham's "History of 
Bethel, Me.," published in 1880. His great- 
great-grandfather was Joseph Twitchell, ol 
Sherborn, Mass.; and his great-grandfather 
was Deacon Ezra Twitchell, one of the pioneer 
settlers of Bethel, Me. Dr. Twitchell's pa- 
ternal and maternal grandfathers were brothers, 
his father's father being Ezra Twitchell, Jr., 
who was born November 24, 1 78 1 , and his 
mother's father Thaddeus Twitchell, born 
January 4, 17S8. The)' were both well-to-do 
farmers in Bethel. 

Alphin Twitchell was born in Bethel, De- 
cember 27, 1804. He was a prosperous drover 
and cattle dealer, and occupied a prominent 
position in the community, holding many local 
offices, and acting as Selectman for a number 
of years. He died in 1887, the day before 
his eighty-third birthday. Mrs. Twitchell's 
demise occurred in August, 1872. They were 



9 S 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



stanch Gongregationalists, and reared their 
seven children in that creed. 

Herbert Francis Twitchell received his early 
education in the common schools of Bethel 
and at Gould's Academy. When twenty years 
of age, he went to work in a retail dry -goods 
store in Portland. He remained one year in 
this position, and then took up the study of 
medicine at the Portland School for Medical 
Instruction. He attended lectures at the 
Maine Medical School at Brunswick, main- 
taining a good rank in his classes. He re- 
ceived his diploma in 1883, and was shortly 
afterward appointed House Physician for the 
Maine General Hospital in Portland. In 1884 
hr opened an office at Freeport, Cumberland 
County, and in course of time established a 
successful practice. In the fall of 1892 he 
located at 10 Pine Street, Portland, where he 
still resides. Dr. Twitchell is especially in- 
terested in surgery, and is at present Adjunct 
Surgeon at the Maine General Hospital and 
Assistant Surgeon to the out-clinic of the 
Maine Eye and Ear Infirmary. He is a mem- 
ber of the Maine State Medical Society, which 
he has represented as a delegate at different 
medical gatherings, and before which he has 
read several papers; President of the Portland 
Medical Club; and Treasurer of the Portland 
Academy of Medicine and Science. 

On May 14, 1885, Dr. Twitchell was mar- 
ried to Alice J., daughter of the Rev. Samuel 
L. Gould, a Congregational clergyman, of 
Bethel. He votes in the ranks of the Repub- 
lican party. He is not an aspirant for office, 
having no time to spare from the work of his 
profession, although he was Supervisor of 
Schools for two years while in Freeport. He 
is a Mason, belonging to Freeport Lodge, No. 
25, A. F. & A. M. Dr. Twitchell and his 
wife attend and support the Congregational 
church. The Doctor is esteemed by all who 
know him, his generous nature and ready 
sympathy winning hosts of well-wishers. 



MOS H. NEVINS, a well-known and 
equally respected citizen of New 
Gloucester, Me., was born in this 
town, January 21, 1S24, beingason 
of Zedekiah and Lydia ( Harris") Nevins. His 




great-grandfather on the paternal side was 
Hugh Nevins, who came to this country from 
England, and directly after landing at Boston 
went to Gloucester, Mass. After a short resi- 
dence there he united with a colony that was 
being ■- formed to settle the town of New 
Gloucester, Me. Here he purchased a large 
tract of land, and established a home. He 
was an enterprising citizen and well-to-do in 
the world, and took an active part in building 
the first church in New Gloucester. He died 
in this town, leaving a family of children, of 
whom the youngest son was Samuel. Samuel 
Nevins, after living in New Gloucester for 
a time, removed to Lewiston, Me., where he 
took up farming. Subsequently he returned 
to New Gloucester, and purchased the farm on 
which his grandson, Amos H., now resides. 
the last years of his life being spent here. 
He married Susanna Haskell, of New Glouces- 
ter, and was the father of ten children, none of 
whom are now living. Their names were re- 
spectively as follows : Samuel, Davis, Robert, 
Joel, Amaziah, Zedekiah, Amos, Eliza, Lovina, 
and Susan. 

Zedekiah Nevins, father of the subject of 
this sketch, followed the vocation of a farmer 
during his entire active life. His wife, Lydia 
Harris by maiden name, was born in Minot, 
Me. She was a daughter of Amos Harris, who 
married Isabel Parsons, of New Gloucester, a 
descendant of Captain William Harris, a pa- 
triot soldier of the Revolution. She bore her 
husband four children, namely: Samuel, who 
died in 1873; Amos H., whose name prefaces 
this article; Adam Wilson, who died in 1860; 
and Olive, who became the wife of George 
Rose, and resides in Falmouth, Me. Mrs. 
Zedekiah Nevins, who made her home with 
her son Amos H., died in 1871, at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty years. 

Amos H. Nevins acquired a good practical 
education in the common schools and at 
Auburn Academy, Auburn, Me. At the age 
of eighteen years he began teaching in the 
schools of Orange, N.J., and subsequently 
continued the same occupation in Pennsyl- 
vania for about three years. He then returned 
to Cumberland County, and settled in the 
town of Brunswick, where he taught school a 
portion of the time during his resilience there. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIF.W 



99 



From Brunswick he came to New Gloucester, 
and followed school-teaching from his second 
advent in this town until 1862. Since then 
he has had charge of the old home farm, with 
the exception of a period of two years, during 
which he conducted the town farm. His farm 
contains one hundred and fifteen acres of good 
land ; and here, besides carrying on general 
farming, he gives special attention to butter- 
making. In October, 1 84S, Mr. Nevins was 
united in marriage with Miss Mary A. Suth- 
erland, who was born in Lisbon, Me., March 
2, 1S27, a daughter of Benjamin and Mary 
(Whitney) Sutherland. Her father was a na- 
tive of Lisbon, Me., and her mother of Gor- 
ham, this State. Mrs. Nevins's grandfather, 
Alexander Sutherland, was born in Scotland, 
whence he emigrated to America. He espoused 
the cause of the colonists in their struggle 
with Great Britain, and fought bravely in the 
patriot army. His last days were spent in 
the town of Lisbon, Me. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Nevins has been 
blessed by the birth of six children, five sons 
and a daughter, as follows: Wilson, born in 
1849, was a graduate of Bowdoin College, and 
married Josephine Stone, daughter of Captain 
William Stone, of Falmouth, Me., in which 
place he and his wife reside. Winfield Scott, 
born in 1851, graduated from Gorham Semi- 
nary, and married Mary E. Leavitt, of Salem, 
Mass., daughter of Israel P. and Elizabeth 
Leavitt. After an apprenticeship to news- 
paper work on the Lewiston Journal of Lewis- 
ton, Me., in 1873 he obtained the position of 
reporter and correspondent for the Boston 
Herald, in the towns of Lynn and Salem, 
Mass., which he has since retained, and is 
besides a correspondent for the New York 
Tribune. Helen L., the only daughter, who 
makes her home with her parents, was born 
February 3, 1862. She is a successful 
teacher, having followed that vocation in 
Hardwick, Vt. , and in Auburn, Me. Eben, 
born May 2, 1863, married Alice Noyes, of 
Pownal, Me., and resides in Lynn, Mass., 
where he is engaged as Chief Engineer at the 
Electric Station of the Lynn & Boston Elec- 
tric Railroad. Amos Harris, born in Janu- 
ary, 1865, died at the age of seven years. 
John P., born in June, 1869, is an electrical 

L.OFC. 



engineer, being employed in that capacity in 
the Electric Railway Station in Chelsea, 
Mass. He has twice married, his first wife 
being Miss Ida May Holland, of Prince Ed- 
ward's Island, who died in 1893. After her 
death he formed a second union with Miss 
Alice Johnson, of Newburyport, Mass. Mr. 
Nevins has given all his children the advan- 
tages of a high and normal school education. 
In politics Mr. Nevins is a Republican. 
He is well and favorably known throughout 
the county, and his services in public life 
have been of material advantage to his town. 
In 1868, 1880, and 1881 he was Selectman, 
and in 1870 and 1S71 a member of the School 
Committee. In 1868, when first elected to 
the office of Selectman, New Gloucester was 
deeply in debt; and during his period of office, 
with the aid of several other leading citizens, 
this debt was raised, and in addition a suffi- 
cient sum was obtained for the erection of the 
town poor farm buildings. He also took 
the leading steps toward the establishment of 
the Public Library at New Gloucester, and 
the erection of a fine class of new school- 
houses. Both he and Mrs. Nevins are attend- 
ants of the Baptist church of New Gloucester, 
and the family is one that has attained well- 
deserved prominence as representative of a 
useful and desirable class of citizenship. 




EWIS ALDEN GOUDY, President of 
the Goudy & Kent Corporation, and a 
resident of Portland since 1869, was 
born at Boothbay, Me., June 10, 
1849, son of Alden and Augusta P. (Soule) 
Goudy. His mother, a daughter of David 
Soule, of Woolwich, Me., is lineally de- 
scended from George Soule, who came over in 
the "Mayflower," and was afterward promi- 
nent in the early history of the Plymouth 
Colony. He was one of the men sent out to 
gather food for the first Thanksgiving dinner, 
and one of the seven men selected by Miles 
Standish to make the first reconnoisance for 
Indians. On the paternal side Mr. Goudy's 
great-grandfather, who was a pioneer of York 
County, held a commission from the Massachu- 
setts General Court as Sheriff of the Province 
of Maine, and executed the first criminal con- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



victed and sentenced in the Province. Sheriff 
Goudy's son Amos, who was the grandfather 
of Lewis Alden, followed the occupations of 
fanner and miller, resided in Bristol, and 
married a Miss Church, a member of the noted 
Church family of New England. One of the 
paternal ancestors of his wife was commander 
of a privateer put in commission by the gov- 
ernor of the colonies; and a mahogany table, 
made from a portion of a cargo captured by 
him, is preserved as an heirloom by Mr. 
Goudy's mother. 

Alden Goudy was born in 1821 at Bristol, 
this State, where he passed his earlier years 
in farming and milling. He subsequently 
fitted himself for the profession of a teacher at 
the old Lincoln Academy, New Castle. After 
engaging in that calling for a few years, he 
entered a mercantile business at Boothbay. 
A man of intelligence and of strong individ- 
uality, he became prominent in town and 
county affairs, and served as Selectman and 
Justice of the Peace for many years. He was 
an active temperance leader, and during the 
agitation preceding the adoption of the Maine 
Prohibitory Law assisted in destroying a large 
quantity of liquor. He was a total abstainer 
from both liquor and tobacco, his son Lewis 
following in his footsteps. Of his union with 
Miss Soule, six children were born, Lewis 
Alden being the first-born. 

Lewis Alden Goudy acquired his early edu- 
cation in the schools of Boothbay and Bath. 
In 1869, after completing his education, lie 
came to this city, leaving his position as clerk 
of the Maine Central Railway Company at 
Bath to accept another with a wholesale grain 
and flour house. He remained with this firm 
for twelve consecutive years, having had but 
one week's vacation, but becoming chief clerk 
and accountant of the establishment. In 18S1 
Mr. Goudy formed a partnership with Winthrop 
C. Cobb, and carried on a general baking 
business for the following year, under the firm 
name of W. C. Cobb & Co. Then the senior 
partner retired; and Mr. Goudy continued the 
business alone until 1SS6, when the plant was 
consolidated with that of R. Kent & Son, 
under the name of Goudy & Kent. The new 
firm carried on the manufacture of crackers 
and biscuits, making a specialty of pilot 



bread, which had been manufactured and sold 
throughout New England by the Kents for 
upward of sixty years. The partnership lasted 
until January, 1891, when Mr. Kent retired, 
owing to failing health. Mr. Goudy, having 
acquired all the rights of the old firm, has 
since conducted the business under the same 
style. In February, 1893, the firm was incor- 
porated with an authorized capital of two hun- 
dred thousand dollars, Mr. Goudy being made 
President. On September 30, 1892, the 
entire plant was destroyed by fire, causing a 
very heavy loss. The confectionery plant 
having been left intact, Mr. Goudy continued 
the business without intermission, buying the 
requisite supplies from friendly competitors. 
The plant had an area of thirty thousand 
square feet, and gave employment to from 
seventy-five to a hundred people. On rebuild- 
ing, its capacity was greatly increased, and the 
latest modern conveniences, in both the bis- 
cuit and confectionery departments, were 
added. The factory is now the largest of the 
kind east of Boston, giving employment to six 
travelling salesmen in addition to five local 
wagon salesmen. 

Mr. Goudy is Treasurer of the Lakeside 
Press, a Director of the Casco Box Company, 
and Vice-President of the Portland Board of 
Trade. 

On February 23, 1873, Mr. Goudy was 
united in wedlock with Annie J. Ayers, 
daughter of Joseph and Harriet Ayers. The 
union has been blessed by the birth of four 
children; namely, Annie Louise, Isabelle A., 
Ellen C, and Alice D. Mr. Goudy is broad 
and liberal in his religious views, and regu- 
larly attends the Williston Church. Mrs. 
Goudy, whii is an accomplished musician, has 
sung in the choir of the State Street Church 
for the past twenty years. 

Politically, Mr. Goudy is a stanch Republi- 
can, serving his party frequently as a delegate 
to different conventions, but always declining 
official position. He is identified with the 
Masonic fraternity, being a member of Ancient 
Landmark Lodge, Mt. Vernon Chapter, Port- 
land Council, and Portland Commandery. He 
has membership, in Beacon Lodge, Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows; in Ivanhoe Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias; in the Portland Club, the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Young Men's Republican Club, and the Me- 
chanic Association. • 



6 I EMPLE II. SNOW, a dealer in stoves, 
4 I hardware, and plumbers' supplies, and 
- 1 - one of the old and reliable business 
men of Westbrook, was born in Rumford, Ox- 
ford County, July 8, 1834, son of Samuel 
Stillman and Mary (Hoyt) Snow. Mr. Snow 
is of English descent. His paternal grand- 
father, a New Hampshire man, was a civil en- 
gineer, who made many surveys in his native 
State when settlements were few and far apart. 
Samuel Stillman Snow was a native of Beth- 
lehem, N. II. Reared in an agricultural dis- 
trict, he engaged in farming as a means of earn- 
ing a livelihood, and devoted his life to that 
pursuit. He spent some years in Rumford, 
and in 1848 removed to Westbrook, where he 
remained about ten years. He then located in 
Skowhegan, Me., and in 1867 removed to 
Worcester, Mass., where he died and is buried. 
His span of life embraced seventy-four years. 
Mr. Snow took an ardent interest in politics, 
belonging first to the Whig party and then to 
its outgrowth, the Republican party. He was 
an enthusiastic temperance man and a zealous 
Abolitionist. His wife, who was born in 
Concord, N. H., and lived seventy-four years, 
followed her husband to the grave one year 
after his demise, and is buried in Worcester. 
Both were members of the Congregational 
church. They were the parents of five sons 
and four daughters, all born in Rumford, Me. 
Of these the following are living: Benjamin 
P., Principal of the Yarmouth (Me.) Acad- 
emy; Temple II., the subject of this sketch; 
Mary A., the widow of the late Captain How- 
ell Drinkwater and a resident of Oakland, Cal. ; 
Ellen A., the wife of Hiram Stratton, a 
broker in Worcester, Mass.; and Ezra H., a 
dealer in toys and games, of which he has in- 
vented many, residing in Orange, N.J. Har- 
riet N. married Andrew Partridge, and died, 
leaving two sons and one daughter; Edward 
Payson died unmarried at the age of thirty-two; 
and Samuel S. lived but twenty-three years. 

Temple H. Snow learned the tinsmith's 
trade under the tuition of an old-time tinsmith, 
Sevvell Brackett, and became a most careful 



and thorough workman. He was with Mr. 
Brackett seven years, and then for ten years 
worked for canning companies, being employed 
by Rumrey & Burnham, Plummer & Ma it, and 
the J. W. Jones Company. In 1873, at the 
same time that U. N. McCann retired from 
the firm, he purchased a share in the business 
of the McCann Brothers at 42 Main Street, 
Westbrook ; and for two years business was con- 
ducted under the name of McCann & Snow. 
In 1875 Mr. Snow became sole proprietor, and 
since that time he has carried on the store 
very prosperously. The establishment is well 
stocked with a variety of tinware, hardware, 
stoves, and plumbers' supplies. Estimates for 
plumbing are furnished, and repairing of all 
kinds is done. Mr. Snow is firmly estab- 
lished, and is regarded as one of the most re- 
liable business men of the town. 

In 1864 he was married in Brunswick, Me., 
to Ellen A. Mariner, a native of Brunswick, 
and a daughter of George and Abigail (Moore) 
Mariner. Mr. and Mrs. Mariner were lifelong 
residents of Brunswick, and are buried in that 
town. Mr. and Mrs. Snow have one son, 
George Payson, who is train despatcher at 
South Bramingham, Mass., on the Northern 
Division of the New York & New Haven Rail- 
road. He married Alice M. Fletcher, a 
native of Portsmouth, N.H., who was reared 
in Somerville, Mass., and has two sons — 
George Temple and Edward Harmon. Mr. 
Snow takes an active part in local politics as a 
Republican. Pie was a member of the first 
Board of Aldermen in Westbrook, and served 
efficiently during the difficult year devoted to 
the changing of the town government to the 
more complicated city organization, acting as 
Chairman of the Committee on Accounts and 
as a member of the Committees on Highways 
and Streets, Fire Department, Street Lights, 
Salaries, and Laying out of New Streets. He 
belongs to Temple Lodge, No. 86, A. F. & 
A. M., in which he has filled all the chairs to 
the West ; to Saccarappa Lodge, No. 11, In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows; and to the 
Order of the Eastern Star. Mr. and Mrs. 
Snow are members of the Westbrook Congre- 
gational church, in the choir of which he has 
been leader for a quarter of a century. He is 
an accomplished musician, and has done much 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



good in developing the musical feature of the 
church services. 



JB 



ANIEL WIGGINS, proprietor of a 
small and well-appointed farm in the 
town of Bridgton, has been a lifelong 
resident of Cumberland County, his 
earlier years having been spent in Baldwin, 
where his birth occurred, June 3, 1833. He 
is the representative of an early family of this 
county, his paternal grandparents having re- 
moved to Baldwin from Durham, N.H., in 
1802. They brought with them their chil- 
dren, who assisted in clearing a farm from the 
one hundred acres of land which the grand- 
lather bought, and on which he afterward spent 
his days. 

John Wiggins, the father of Daniel, was 
born in 1793, being still a young boy when he 
came to this county. He followed farming 
throughout his life, coming into possession of 
a part of the old homestead, which he had 
helped to redeem from the wilderness. He 
performed military service in the War of 1812, 
going out with a Maine regiment. He was 
a man of much energy and enterprise, upright 
in his dealings, and well worthy of the high 
regard in which he was held. Religiously, 
he was a member of the Baptist church. He 
closed his eyes on earthly scenes in 1855, 
being then about sixty-three years old. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Betsey Ridlon, 
survived him twenty-three years, dying in 
1878. 

Daniel Wiggins acquired his education by 
attending the district schools of his native 
town. lie was trained to farm work, and re- 
mained on the old homestead until 1870, when 
he removed to another part of the town, where 
he followed his chosen vocation for two years. 
In 1872 Mr. Wiggins took possession of his 
present estate, which contains thirty-eight 
acres of well-improved land. While living in 
Baldwin, he twice served as Selectman, and has 
held other public offices. He is a firm Re- 
publican, supporting the principles of that 
party by voice and vote. Socially, he is con- 
nected by membership with the Masons and 
the < )ild Fellows. 

Mr. Wiggins was married January 11, 1S63, 



to Miss Pamelia A. Barker, who was born in 
the town of Naples, a daughter of Stephen and 
Abigail (Wight) Barker. Two children have 
been born of their felicitous union; namely, 
Mary B. and Charles D., both of whom cele- 
brate the anniversary of their births on the 
7th of June, although there is three years' 
difference in their ages, Mary having been 
born June 7, 1868, and Charles D. June 7, 
1 87 1. Mary is the wife of Hiram T. Clark. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Wiggins are sincere mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church, with 
which he is officially connected, being a Trus 
tee and Steward. 




APTAIN JACOB S. WINSLOW, of 
Portland, one of the largest ship- 
_, builders in the State of Maine, was 
born at Pembroke, Washington 
County, Me., on December 19, 1827. Both 
his father, Jacob Winslow, and his paternal 
grandfather, Snow Winslow, were seafaring 
men, commanders of vessels; and he is himself 
a retired sea captain. 

Snow Winslow followed the sea during the 
greater part of his life, and was captain of a 
vessel engaged in the coasting trade. lie 
died at Havana, Cuba, of yellow fever. His 
wife before marriage was Miss Hannah Ring. 
Their son, Jacob Winslow, was born at North 
Yarmouth, Me., on January 15, 1797. He- 
settled in Pembroke, Me., in 181 2; but later, 
having made that place his home for some 
years, he removed to Lubec, where he had his 
residence during the remainder of his life, 
dying in 1847, although he was able to spend 
but little time on land, as, like his father, he 
followed the vocation of a seaman. He and 
his wife, Elizabeth Clark, to whom he was 
married on April 23, 1823, reared a family of 
ten children, Jacob S. being the second in 
order of birth. The father died in 1847. 

Jacob S. Winslow passed his boyhood on the 
farm and at school, ; but, having inherited 
from his ancestors a liking for the sea, when 
but fourteen years old he went aboard a vessel 
as a common sailor. By his industrious 
habits and integrity of character gradually 
gaining the confidence of his superior officers, 
he won promotions; and within four years he 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



103 



was holding the position of mate. Shortly 
before he attained his majority he was made 
master of the brig "Noble," in which he made 
two trips, one to Philadelphia and the other to 
the West Indies. He afterward successively 
commanded the "Calista," "Bloomer," "Jere- 
miah Fowler," and the barks "Maine Law" 
and "Philena. " The last-named vessel was 
built by him, and he sailed her for six years 
td Europe and the West Indies. In 1862 
Captain Winslow retired from the sea, and 
went into business on Central Wharf, continu- 
ing in the ship-building industry, which he 
bad carried on for some time before giving up 
a seafaring life. He is one of the largest ship- 
builders in this part of New England, having 
built more than one hundred vessels at his 
different ship-yards in Yarmouth, Pembroke, 
and Portland. He is also engaged in the busi- 
ness of a ship chandler and dealer in general 
stores, having conducted the business alone for 
some years, when he entered into pratnership 
with H. P. Dewey, since which time it has 
been carried on under the firm name of J. S. 
Winslow & Co. Captain Winslow was married 
in 1853 to Miss Philena Morton, a daughter of 
Zenas and Eliza Morton, of Lubec, Me. Mrs. 
Winslow died on May 14, 1S77. 

In political views Captain Winslow is a Re- 
publican. He was elected as a Representative 
from Portland to the State legislature in 1S77 
and 1S78, and in 1868 was elected a member 
of the Common Council from Ward 1. Since 
he left the sea and took up his residence in 
Portland, he has taken an active interest in 
local business affairs, and has been a promoter 
of many enterprises that are helpful to the 
welfare and prosperity of the city. He holds 
the position of Director in the Casco National 
Bank, the Portland Lloyds' Insurance Com- 
pany, the Dry Dock Company, and the Bangor 
& Machias Steamboat Company, his sound 
judgment and superior business ability render- 
ins: his services invaluable. 



DAM WINSLOW WILSON, Assist- 
ant Engineer of the Deering Lire De- 
partment and one of the leading con- 
tractors of this city, was born in Fal- 
mouth, Cumberland County, Me., on February 




28, 1854, son of George ami Phcebe (Winslow) 
Wilson, of that place. 

George Wilson was a native of Falmouth, 
where his birth occurred in 1817; and he re- 
ceived his education in the common schools of 
that town. lie then went to work as a clerk 
in a general store, and subsequently engaged 
in business for himself, at which he continued 
until 1883, or within about three years of his 
death, which occurred on January 4, 1886. 
In matters of public interest he took an active 
part, and for many years was a member of the 
School Committee. He also held the position 
of Postmaster at Morrill's Corner for twelve 
years. When special efforts were first begun 
in his neighborhood in the cause of temper- 
ance, he was one of four men at Morrill's Cor- 
ner and vicinity to take the initiative in sign- 
ing the pledge; and throughout his life he was 
an ardent advocate of temperance principles. 
His wife, formerly Phcebe Winslow, was a 
daughter of Adam Winslow, of Falmouth, who 
was a Major in the War of the Revolution. 
Three of the four children born of their union 
lived to maturity, namely: Marcia 13., the 
widow of Charles Nason, of Gorham, Me. ; 
Wallace H., of Portland; and Adam Winslow. 

Adam Winslow Wilson acquired his ele- 
mentary education in the common schools of 
Westbrook, Me., after which he took a college 
preparatory course at Westbrook Seminar)'. 
On leaving school, he entered the employ of 
a large wholesale shoe firm in Portland, with 
the intention of learning the business; but, his 
health being seriously impaired by indoor 
work, he was obliged to- abandon his cherished 
plans, and seek a new field of labor. About 
1880 he purchased the farm which he has since 
carried on, and in connection therewith he 
does a large teaming business that furnishes 
employment for several men and teams. In 
1890 he added contracting to his other busi- 
ness, and is now engaged in building sewers, 
laying water-works, doing ledge-work, and 
taking other contracts of a similar character. 

Mr. Wilson served from 1887 to 1889, in- 
clusive, as Selectman of the town, and has 
been since 1882 a member of the Town Coin 
mittee; and since 1891, when Deering became 
a city, has been Assistant Engineer for the 
ward in which he resides. The year the city 



io4 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was incorporated the Street Commissioners!) ip 
was tendered him by a unanimous vote of the 
Hoard of Aldermen, but he declined to serve. 
Like his father, Mr. Wilson is actively inter- 
ested in temperance matters, and, like him, is 
also a believer in Spiritualism. 



f@K 



EORGE CROCKETT JOHNSON, 

VI^T chie ^ cn S' neer °f tne steamer " liay 

— ■*" State" and senior engineer of the 
Portland Steamship Company, in whose em- 
ploy he has served faithfully for forty-two 
years, was born in Portland, November 17, 
1832. He is the only surviving son of the late 
Eben and Ann (Mulloy) Johnson, and is the 
third in line of his family to follow the sea. 

His paternal grandfather, Eben Johnson, 
Sr., was long engaged in the coasting trade. 
During the War of 181 2 he was out in a sloop 
with his son Eben, who was then a boy of 
fourteen, and was captured by a British pri- 
vateer, who confiscated his sloop, and, putting 
him and his son in a small boat, gave them 
permission to go ashore. During their trip 
they were stopped at Fort Preble and prevented 
from either coming into port or going out until 
morning. The night spent in that open boat 
under the guns of Fort Preble were the longest 
known to the memory of the two men. 

The younger Eben Johnson was born in 
Falmouth in 1798. When quite young he- 
sailed in coasting vessels with his father; 
and in his mature manhood he was master of 
a packet plying between Portland and Boston, 
following the sea about forty-five years. The 
last ten or fifteen years of his life he was in 
the grocery business in Portland. He died in 
1S70. His wife had died many years before, 
in 1837. Six children were born to them, 
namely: Frances A., wife of Andrew Swan, 
of Everett, Mass.; Eben, Jr., who died in 
Medford, Mass.; Greeley H., who died in 
1894 in Boston; George C, the subject of this 
sketch; Mary H., wife of Harvey G. Fly,_of 
East Boston; and James Boyd, who died in in- 
fancy. 

George Crockett was the fourth child of the 
group as above named. He early attended 
the grammar school on Park Street, presided 
over at that time bv Master Jackson, and 



afterward studied at a select school. When 
sixteen years of age he went as deck boy on 
the steamer "Huntress," plying between Port- 
land and Hallowell; and he was subsequently 
raised to the position of quartermaster, which 
he held till the boat was taken off the line. 
He was then employed as a sailor on sailing- 
vessels, and next obtained a position as tire- 
man on the steamer "T. F. Secor, " which ran 
between Belfast and Maehias, touching at in- 
termediate points, and later between Portland 
and Damariscotta direct. It was at this time 
that he began his preparation for his later en- 
gineering career. He was afterward fireman 
one year on the steamer "Governor," plying 
between Portland and Bangor, and then, at 
twenty years of age, accepted a position as as- 
sistant engineer for a short time on the 
steamer "Creole," which ran between Boston 
and St. John, touching at Portland. 

During the winter of 1852-53 Mr. Johnson 
was employed at the Hinckley locomotive 
works in Boston, there obtaining a good 
knowledge of the construction of engines; 
and in the spring of 1853 he went to New 
York, where the "Daniel Webster" was built. 
He was fireman on that steamer when she was 
brought to Portland, and for a short time 
after, when she was running between Portland 
and Bangor. On May 3, 1853, he entered 
the employ of the Portland Steamship Com- 
pany, then, and until January 1, 1896, known 
as the Portland Steam Packet Company, en- 
gaging first as fireman on the "St. Lawrence," 
which plied between Portland and Boston. In 

1854 he was licensed as assistant engineer, 
and went into that capacity on the steamer 
"Atlantic." The year following the sale of 
the "St. Lawrence" he operated the steam 
tug "Terror" at Bangor; and in the fall oi 

1 85 5 he again entered the employ of the Port- 
land Steam Packet Company, going on the 
"Forest City" as assistant engineer. The 
"Atlantic" was sold in 1856 to New Orleans 
parties, and in August of that year Mr. John- 
son went South as assistant engineer of that 
steamer. In June, 1857, he returned to the 
Portland Steamship Company, and during the 
war was in their employ, being assistant en- 
gineer of the "Forest City" when she was 
notified to be prepared for action at the time 




•>*. 



GEORGE C. JOHNSON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



107 



of the capture of the revenue cutter "Caleb 
dishing " from Portland Harbor by the rebels. 
She was sent after that vessel with a company 
of soldiers from Fort Preble and two twelve- 
pounder field-pieces on board. 

The steamer "Chesapeake" was also sent 
out. The "Caleb dishing" being a sailing- 
vessel, and the weather being calm, the rebels 
set file to her and came to the "Forest City" 
in one of her boats under a flag of truce. 
After taking the prisoners on board, the 
"Forest City" proceeded east and captured 
the schooner "Archer," which was the vessel 
the rebels had used to come into Portland 
Harbor. The "Caleb dishing," after burning 
about an hour, blew up, the fire having reached 
her magazine. In 1865 Mr. Johnson was as- 
sistant engineer of the "New Brunswick," 
plying between Boston and St. John, N.B.; 
and in 1866 he was again assigned to the 
" Forest City," this time as chief engineer. 
In 1876 Mr. Johnson was transferred to the 
"John Brooks " as chief engineer, acting in 
that capacity until January 1, 1883, when he 
was transferred to shore duty, and sent to 
New York to look after building the "Tre- 
mont." This new steamer was placed on the 
line July 3, 1883, Mr. Johnson continuing to 
act as chief engineer on her until July 19, 
1890, when he was transferred to the steamer 
"• Portland," acting as chief on her until Feb- 
ruary, 1894. He was then again placed on 
shore duty in connection with the building of 
the steamer "Bay State," which steamer was 
placed on the line April 18, 1S95. As men- 
tioned above, Mr. Johnson is chief engineer 
on the "Bay State" at the present time; and 
he has occupied for some years the responsible 
position of senior engineer of the company. 

Mr. Johnson has been unfortunate in losing 
by death three estimable wives. He was first 
married in 1854 to Miss Mary J. Rich, daugh- 
ter of John and Mary Rich, of Gray, Me. 
She died in 1S56, leaving a son, Charles 
Edwin, he dying at the age of six years, four 
months. In 1859 he married Miss Caroline 
A. Waterhouse, of Saco, Me., who died in 
1865, leaving a daughter, Carrie A., now the 
wife of Isaiah H. Baker, of Portland, and 
mother of six children. His third wife, 
Emily J., daughter of Gardner and Emily 



Rich, died without issue. In 18S2 Mr. John- 
son married his present wife, who was Miss 
Helen P. Gibbs, daughter of George H. ami 
Phiolena P. Gibbs, of North Dana, Mass. 
She has been the mother of four children, two 
of whom, Arthur C. and Mildred H., are now 
living. 

In politics Mr. Johnson is for the best man 
for the office. He is a member of Portland 
Lodge, No. 1, A. F. & A. M., Greenleaf 
Chapter, Portland Council, and St. Albans 
Commandery, Knights Templars; and he is 
also enrolled as a member of Ancient Brothers' 
Lodge and Machigonne Encampment, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He attends 
and helps to support the Williston Church, of 
Portland, of which his wife is a member. 




ILLIAM II. H. SNOW, a practical 
farmer and prosperous citizen resid- 
ing in the southern part of the town 
of New Gloucester, was born in Harpswell, 
Me., on October 1, 1840, son of Jesse and 
Eliza (Toothaker) Snow. 

His father, who was also a native of Harps- 
well, Me., began active life as a farmer of that 
town, removing thence to Pownal, Cumberland 
County, in 1844. He purchased a farm near 
Pownal Centre, where he still resides, being 
successfully engaged in mixed husbandry. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Eliza 
Toothaker, died on February 17, 1892. Eight 
children were the fruit of their union, as fol- 
lows: William H. H. ; Jonathan A., living 
in Pownal, Me. ; Samuel T. , also a resident 
of Pownal; Laura A., who resides with her 
father; Melvina Adelia, wife of G. T. Allen, 
of Pownal ; Conrad, who married Miss flattie 
B. Haskell, and lives in Pownal; Plliza A., 
who died when seven years old ; and Nellie A., 
the wife of Harry Wilson, of Deering, this 
county. 

William H. II. Snow in his boyhood at- 
tended the common schools, and assisted his 
father on the farm during his vacations. At 
the age of nineteen years he left home to go to 
sea, and followed a sailor's life for eleven years. 
He then returned home, and subsequently pur- 
chased a farm in the town of Pownal, which 
he conducted for thirteen years, or until 1887, 



io8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



at which time he removed to New Gloucester, 
and undertook the management of the farm 
that he now owns, but which then belonged to 
his father-in-law. It contains one hundred 
and thirty acres of land well adapted for mixed 
farming, and is known as the "Bear Brook 
Farm," deriving its name from a brook run- 
ning through it. Mr. Snow's specialty is the 
production of milk; and he keeps sixteen head 
of milch cows, which average daily about 
twenty-four gallons of milk, which is marketed 
in Portland. Mr. Snow was married Decem- 
ber 14, 1S71, to Miss Mattie N. 13. Fogg, who 
was born in New Gloucester, July 24, 1848, 
the only daughter of Elliott Y. .and Adeline 
(Bennett) Fogg. Her father, who was a pros- 
perous New Gloucester farmer, died May 7, 
1889, and her mother February 23, 1892. The 
union of Mr. and Mrs. Snow has been blessed 
li\ the birth of two sons: George F. , who died 
when sixteen months old; and Irving F. , born 
July 11, 1876, who is now living at home. 

Mr. Snow is a Democrat in his political 
principles, having never voted outside of that 
party. Socially, he is a member of Cumber- 
land Lodge, No. 12, A. F. & A. M., of New 
Gloucester. Both he and his wife are regular 
attendants of the Universalist church of New 
Gloucester. 



OSFP1I F. CHAPLIN, superintendent 
of the Portland department of the Con- 
solidated Ice Company, South 1'ortland, 
Cumberland County, is a Maine boy by 
birth, breeding, and ancestry. He was born 
on November 20, 1858, in Bridgton, son of 
Alonzo C. Chaplin. 

This family have lived in Maine for many 
generations, Caleb A. Chaplin, Joseph's grand- 
father, having been a native of the town of 
Naples, which bounds Bridgton on the south- 
east. He was extensively engaged in lumber- 
ing and farming, in which pursuits he was 
eminently successful, being one of the leading 
men of his community, and a stanch member 
of the old Whig party. The maiden name of 
his wife was Ruth Ann Jordan. She was a 
descendant of an early settler of Portland. 

Alonzo C. Chaplin was born on the old 
homestead in Naples, and at an early age 



learned the carpenter's trade, which he fol- 
lowed for some years. In 1862, during the 
progress of the Civil War, he enlisted in Com 
pany A, Twenty-fifth Maine Volunteer Infan- 
try, for a term of nine months. Shortly after 
returning home from the army he entered the 
employ of D. W. Clark, of Portland, as mill- 
man. He subsequently went into partnership 
with D. W. Clark and Ashbel Chaplin, with 
whom, under the firm name of D. W. Clark & 
Co., he carried on an extensive ice business for 
about three years. He then retired from that 
concern, and accepted the position of superin- 
tendent and master mechanic of the Clark & 
Chaplin Ice Company, in whose employ he con- 
tinued until his death, February 4, 188.8. 

He married Antoinette E. , daughter of 
Israel P. Peabody, of Bridgton; and four chil- 
dren were born to them, as follows: Annie B. , 
who married Franklin A. Skillins, a sketch of 
whose life may be found on another page of 
this volume; Nettie N., widow of the late 
Willard Brackett, and mother of two children 
-Philip and Marion; Mary Frances, a 
teacher in Portland schools; and Joseph F., 
the subject of this sketch, he being the eldest 
child. 

Mr. Chaplin has spent the larger portion of 
his life in Cape Elizabeth, that part of the 
town which is now South Portland, he having 
been here reared and educated. On leaving 
school in 1878, he entered the employ of the 
firm of D. W. Clark & Co. as engineer, contin- 
uing with the company after its incorporation 
as the Clark & Chaplin Ice Company, and in 
1888 was made foreman of the wholesale de- 
partment. In January, 1896, the wholesale 
department was transferred to the Consolidated 
Ice Company of New York, with whom Mr. 
Chaplin continues. 

Politically, Mr. Chaplin is an active Repub- 
lican; and at the time of writing this sketch 
he is one of the Selectmen of his town. So- 
cially, he is a member of Elizabeth Cits- 
Lodge, No. 1 14, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and of Bayard Lodge, No. 44, 
Knights of Pythias, of South Portland. 

On June 13, 1883, Mr. Chaplin was married 
to Ella M. Trickey, daughter of Charles P. 
Trickey, of South Portland. Their union has 
been brightened by the birth of one child, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



109 



Merle Peabody, who was born May 7, 1S86. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Chaplin arc conscientious 
and valuedfnembers of Brown's Hill Methodist 
Church. 



T^VATIIAN E. REDLON, the oldest con- 
I — -I trading mason in Portland, was born 
I I s I in Buxton, Me., September 13, 

^"""""^ 1830, son of Amos and Elizabeth 
(Berry) Redlon. He is of Scotch descent, 
his grandfather, Ebenezer Redlon, coming to 
tli is country from the Orkney Islands. Amos 
Redlon, the father of our subject, who was 
a shoemaker by trade, died March 10, i860, in 
his seventy-sixth year. He was an upright 
and honest man, and an active member of the 
Methodist church. His wife, who was a 
daughter of Isaac Berry, an old and respected 
farmer of Buxton, died in 1877. 

Nathan E. Redlon attended the common 
schools of his native town and Limerick 
Academy. When eleven years of age, he 
began to learn the shoemaker's trade from his 
father; but his tastes ran in another direction, 
and, when he was eighteen, he engaged as an 
apprentice with W. P. Piles, of Portland, to 
learn the mason's trade. His term of appren- 
ticeship completed he went to work as a jour- 
im \ man for three years in Portland, then to 
Biddeford in July, 1854, and in March of the 
following year he started for the West, locating 
first in Kansas. In those early days Lawrence 
and Topeka were the only large towns in Kan- 
sas, which was then a Territory, though its 
settlement was progressing rapidly under the 
homestead law. A. H. Reecler, of Pennsyl- 
vania, was the first governor ; and Mr. Redlon 
voted in the first election during his adminis- 
tration for Territorial offices. This was the 
time also when Kansas was the battle ground 
between the friends and enemies of slavery — 
the days of border ruffianism — and Mr. Red- 
lon was an eye-witness of some of the outrages 
perpetrated by the white savages. Mr. Redlon 
sunn left Kansas, and went up the Mississippi 
to St. Anthony, now Minneapolis. This great 
city was also in an embryo state, there being 
very few houses on the Minneapolis side of the 
river. He stayed but a year at St. Anthony, 
then returned to Portland, and entered the 



employ of Sewell C. Chase as journeyman in 
1858. Two years later he was made foreman, 
the first contract finished under his supervision 
having been that for building the glass manu- 
factory. He afterward worked on the old 
Thomas Block on Commercial Street, which 
was erected about the time when most of the 
first business blocks on that street were 
erected. In 1863, there being little to do in 
the building line, Mr. Redlon engaged in the 
manufacture and retail sale of shoes, and con- 
ducted a fairly successful business for three- 
years. Then came the great fire of 1866, 
causing a great demand for builders; ami he 
returned to his former occupation, taking 
small contracts at first. His work was done 
promptly and in a thorough and painstaking 
manner. From that time to the present his 
business has increased till he is now one of the 
largest contractors for mason-work in the city, 
besides being the oldest. In [868 he formed 
a partnership with Samuel A. Knight, which 
continued till the death of the latter in 1888. 
The firm furnished constant employment to 
from thirty to forty men for about nine months 
in the year. Specimens of their work stand- 
ing to-day are: John E. Donnell's Block on 
Middle Street; the store now occupied by 
J. \V. Perkins, owned by W. W. Thomas, 
John Rand's fine house on High Street; the 
adjoining house for H. T. Plummer; T. H. 
Weston's house on Deering Street ; the house 
occupied by the Hon. Thomas B. Reed; the 
west wing of the Maine General Hospital ; the 
Eye and Ear Infirmary on Congress Street, a 
large four-story brick building; and the John 
Little Block. In 1895 Mr. Redlon built the 
new power house for the Portland Street Rail- 
road Company, which is considered one of the 
finest structures of the kind in the country. 
It is a very large building, standing on piles, 
and was built from the foundation by Mr. Red- 
lon, the work occupying between sixty and 
seventy men during a whole season. In 1892 
he bought the brickyard on John Street, Port- 
land, previously owned by Gurney & Son, with 
a capacity of one million five hundred thousand 
bricks, and is at present operating that plant. 
He has been President of the Portland Heater 
Company, President of the Casco Carbonized 
Cement Pipe Company, and was an active 



UIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



charter member of the Builders' Exchange, of 
which also he has been President. He was 
one of the founders of the Casco Building Loan 
Association, and also of the Portland Building 
Loan Association, and has been a member of 
the Security Committee of each since they 
were organized. 

In politics he is a Republican, and was a 
member of the Common Council in 1875-76, 
representing Ward 5; and in 1889 he was 
Alderman from Ward 4. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Republican City Committee for fif- 
teen years, and Treasurer of the same for two 
or three years. In 1880 he was elected to the 
State legislature, and was re-elected in 1881. 
He belongs to Ancient Landmark Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., Greenleaf Chapter, St. Albans 
Commandery, and Egyptian Rite of Mem- 
phis; and he was Senior Warden of Ligonia 
Lodge, and now Vice-Grand of Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and Falmouth Encamp- 
ment. He is a member of the Maine Chari- 
table Mechanic Association, of which he has 
been President. He also belongs to the Port- 
land Club; and in temperance work he takes 
an active interest, and is a member of the Good 
Templars and the Sons of Temperance. 

Mr. Redlon has been twice married. His 
first wife, to whom he was united in 1856, was 
Alcadania A. (dishing) Redlon, daughter of 
Dr. John Gushing, of Lewiston, Me. She died 
in 1865, leaving two sons: Franklin R., who 
is now associated with his father in business; 
and Harry, who died at the age of three years. 
In 1866 Mr. Redlon was united to his second 
wife, Sarah P., daughter of Thomas Files, of 
Portland. Mrs. Redlon is a professing mem- 
ber of the Chestnut Street Methodist Church, 
which her husband also attends and supports. 
Franklin R. Redlon, who became associated 
with his father in business in 1889, was born 
July 17, 1857, and is a graduate of the Port- 
land High School. A resident of Deering, 
he has been active in the politics of that city 
as a member of the City Committee, and as 
an Alderman from Ward 6 for the second year 
that Deering was a city. He was Chairman of 
the Light Committee, which during his term 
made a contract with the Deering Electric 
Light Company to light the streets of the city. 
He was also Chairman of the Committee on 



Fire Department, serving the following year 
as Chairman of the Board of Aldermen. He 
is a member of Ancient Landmark Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., of which he is present Master; 
Greenleaf Chapter, of which he is Scribe; be- 
longs to Portland Council; is Generalissimo 
in St. Albans Commandery; and is a member 
of Yates Lodge of Perfection ; and he belongs 
to Harmony Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; to the Maine Charitable Mechanic 
Association; and to the Portland Athletic 
Club, of which he was a charter member ami 
in which he took a great interest while he 
lived in Portland. He was Captain of the old 
fire company in Ward 6, and has for years 
belonged to the Builders' Exchange, of which 
he is Vice-President. On August 29, 1880, 
he was married to Jennie E., daughter of John 
A. Hennigan, of Maitland, N. S. ; and their 
home has been brightened by two children — 
Nathan C. and Lena F. They have a hand- 
some resilience at 46 Brown Street, which Mr. 
Redlon erected in 1875. He attends and sup- 
ports the Episcopal church in Deering, of 
which his wife is a member. 




ALVIN S. GODDARD, a highly 
successful wholesale and retail florist, 
doing business at 3 Lelancl Street, 
Deering Centre, was born in Bruns- 
wick, Me., April 5, 1S26, son of Robert and 
Abigail S. (Winslow) Goddard. His grand- 
father was Robert Goddard, Sr. ; and his greal 
grandfather, James Goddard, who was a resi- 
dent of Falmouth, Me., was a Quaker, and a 
member of one of the first societies of Frjends 
organized in the State of Maine. Robert God- 
dard, Jr., father of our subject, was a success- 
ful agriculturist, of Brunswick, Me. His 
wife, Abigail, reared three sons and a daugh- 
ter — James, Sarah, Charles, and Calvin S. 
Both parents have passed away. 

Calvin S. Goddard, the youngest child of 
his parents, received a practical education in 
the common schools of Brunswick, and sub- 
sequently spent a short time in a private 
school, where he studied the higher English 
branches. He then taught school for a few 
months, relinquishing that occupation at the 
age of sixteen to learn the shoemaker's trade, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



which he subsequently followed for about 
twenty years. Being the owner of a piece of 
land, he carried on a small nursery business in 
connection with his shoemaking. He then 
went to Westbrook, or Morrill's Corner, as it 
was then called, where he was employed for 
twelve months at a salary of a thousand dollars 
a year. Purchasing the Evergreen Nursery 
from John \Y. Adams, he conducted it for about 
eight years, and, after dividing the land up into 
house lots, sold it. The next four years were 
spent in Lynn, Mass., with C. A. Coffin & 
Co., in the manufacture of boots and shoes, 
Mr. Goddard having charge of the lasting 

and McKay stitching-r n. Failing health 

caused him to return to Leering, Me., where 
he purchased three house lots, on which he 
erected a dwelling the first year, and began in 
a small way the florist's business, which has 
since attained such large proportions. Mr. 
Goddard has now about an acre of land on 
which are his greenhouses, and an idea of 
their size may be gained from the fact that ten 
thousand square feet of glass are required to 
cover them. It is now upward of twenty- 
years since he established this business, and 
thus far dining the current year his business 
in cut flowers amounts to about six thousand 
dollars. 

Mr. Goddard married Miss Lucy R. Varney, 
a daughter of Stephen and Mary (Pettingill) 
Varney. Her father was a native of Bruns- 
wick, and her mother of Lewiston, Me. 
Four children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. 
Goddard, as follows: Lewis C. , who is fore- 
man for his father, married Miss Maria Cart- 
land, a daughter of Stephen and Elmira (Day) 
Cartland, and has three children — Annette 
M., Lucile B., and Alice M. ; Mary I-:., the 
wife of Moses M. Hawks, having lost three 
children, has six living — Lucy A., Howard 
C, Harold L. , Nathaniel, Mary Florence, and 
Robert E. ; Stephen B. died in infancy; Ed- 
ward H., a resident of Deering, married Miss 
Ella O. Harmon, a daughter of Samuel Har- 
mon, and has three children — Calvin S., 
Eunice, and Bernice Ida. 

Mr. and Mrs. Goddard are Quakers in re- 
ligious belief, and he has acted as minister in 
the Friends' church in Portland for a quarter 
of a century. 



OSEPH II. HEZELTON, a well known 
resident of Westbrook and the popular 
proprietor and captain of a summer 
steamboat, was born in Westbrook, 
March 13, 1839, son of Ivory and Hannah 
(Thompson) Hezelton. The family is of 
Colonial origin. It began with two brothers, 
Robert and John Hezelton, who settled 
upon land bordering on the Merrimack River, 
now occupied by the present town of Bradford, 
Mass. Jonathan Hezelton, Mi-. Hezelton's 
grandfather, who was a direct descendant of 
one of these brothers, was a native of Brad- 
ford, and served as a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary War. While serving in the Conti- 
nental Army, lie acquired a reputation for feats 
of strength. Possessed of a powerful frame, 
he was able to cut two cords of wood in a day. 
He followed agriculture as an occupation. 

Ivory Hezelton, Mr. Hezelton's father, was 
born in Waterboro, York County, in 1804. 
When a young man, he settled in Westbrook, 
where he engaged in teaming. He had a con- 
tract to transport paper stock from the mills 
to Portland, and later he did the teaming for 
the Westbrook Manufacturing Company. In 
1866 he sold his equipment to his son Joseph 
H., and retired from business. He was deeply 
interested in the general welfare and improve- 
ment of the community, of which he was an 
esteemed member; and he was prominent 
among the progressive and liberal residents of 
the town. He was connected with Temple 
Lodge, No. 86, A. F. & A. M., in which he 
was for some time an official. He also had 
affiliation with the old lodge of Odd Fellows, 
dating from 1846, until it disbanded, when he 
retired from the order. Politically, he was a 
Republican. In his religious views he was 
a Methodist, of which chinch he was an active 
member for many years. He passed the last 
years of his life in retirement at his home in 
Westbrook, and died in 1884. His wife, 
Hannah, who was a native of Westbrook, be- 
came the mother of eight children, seven of 
whom are living. Of these Harriet C. is the 
wife of Stillman Barbour, of Washington, 
D. C. ; Almery resides in Lewiston, Me. ; Re- 
liance L. is the wife of Stephen M. Dresser, 
of Westbrook ; and Gardner is a resident of 
Westbrook. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Joseph H. Hezelton attended the public 
schools of his native town, graduating from 
the high school in 1856. After leaving school, 
he engaged in teaming. Ten years later he 
succeeded to his father's interests in that busi- 
ness, and he subsequently did the trucking 
for the Westbrook Manufacturing Company 
for some twenty-five years. At the same time 
he was also successfully carrying on a farm. 
During the Civil War he was employed for 
some time on board a transport steamer. The 
experience he obtained here was of use to him 
when, upon relinquishing the trucking busi- 
ness, he became the owner and commander of 
a pleasure steamboat. He runs his boat from 
Westbrook to Mallison Falls, South Windham, 
in the summer season, and finds it both an 
agreeable and remunerative employment. 

On October 11, 1863, Mr. Hezelton was 
united in marriage to Mary E. Schwartz, 
daughter of John C. Schwartz, of Westbrook. 
Of his six children five are living, namely: 
William L., a resident of Brookline, Mass. ; 
Nellie L., wife of O. B. Vinal, of Vinal 
Haven, Me. ; Joseph H., Jr., who is engaged 
with T. H. Snow in the plumbing business in 
Westbrook; Alice M., who resides at home; 
and Mildred H., who is attending school in 
Westbrook. In politics Mr. Hezelton supports 
the Republican party. He served as a member 
of the Board of Selectmen in the old town 
government'for the years 1881 and 1883, and 
under the city charter he has been an As- 
sessor since 1892. Socially, Mr. Hezelton is 
popular with his fellow-citizens, among whom 
he has a wide acquaintance. In Saccarappa 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
which he is a member, he has a high standing, 
having been elected to the various seats of 
honor in that organization. Eighteen years 
ago he united with the Methodist Episcopal 
church, with which he has been officially con- 
nected as a Trustee, Steward, and Secretary of 
the Board. 



lAPTAIN ALBERT BRAGG, senior 

commander of the Maine Steamship 
Company's line, was born at Hyan- 
nis, Mass., August 31, 1838, son of 
John and Cyrena (Baxter) Bragg. Hyannis 




was for many years the home of the Bfaggs 
and the Baxters. Baxter Bragg, grandfather 
of Captain Bragg, was one of the early settlers 
there. 

John Bragg was probably born in Hyannis, 
which was his boyhood's home. He went to 
sea when quite young, and first commanded a 
fisherman, then a coaster, following the sea 
up to the time of his death. His wife, who is 
the daughter of John B. Baxter, of Hyannis, 
is still living. They reared ten children, the 
subject of this sketch being the eldest son 
and the eldest surviving member of the fam- 
ily. Cornelia is now the widow of Charles 
Hardwick, of Bridgeport, Conn. ; James B. is 
a practising physician in Bridgeport; Martha 
D., twin sister of James, is the wife of Will- 
iam A. Hallett, of Hyannis; Jennie is married 
to T. P. Lovell, of IJoston, a member of the 
firm of John P. Lovell & Sons; John P. re- 
sides in Brooklyn; Amanda, who was the wife 
of Dr. Liston, of Albany, N.Y., died some 
time since, leaving five children; Wallace 
died, leaving two children; Emma, who was 
the wife of Edward Gage, of Boston, has also 
passed from life, leaving two children; and 
another child died in infancy. 

Albert Bragg received his early education 
in the schools of Hyannis. He first went to 
sea when ten or twelve years old, accompany- 
ing his father on a fishing trip. From that 
time until he was fourteen he made frequent 
voyages of the same sort. In 1852, though 
only a boy of fourteen, he shipped as an ordi- 
nary seaman, under command of Captain Orrin 
B. Bearse, on the ship "Berlin," which sailed 
from New York to San Francisco, and was 
one hundred and eighty days making the 
voyage. The vessel remained in San Fran- 
cisco some weeks, and young Bragg had an 
opportunity to witness some of the curious 
phases of life on the Pacific coast in those wild 
days. His uncle, John B. Baxter, who was 
third mate of the "Berlin," remained in San 
I'rancisco, and is still living there. The 
vessel next went to the Chintz Islands, Peru- 
vian territory, where she remained two or 
three months, loading with guano. It next 
sailed to Callao, where the crew were given a 
furlough for some time. The next stop was 
at Baltimore, and it was two years before the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



"3 



"Berlin" finally reached home. Mr. Bragg 
left the vessel on arriving home, and engaged 
in the coasting trade. When he was nineteen 
years of age, he was Captain of a coaster, a 
schooner named the "Cape May." He has 
since commanded the "New Delight," the 
"T. P. Bell," and the "Julia Smith," all 
coasting vessels. In 1867 he entered the em- 
ploy of the Maine Steamship Company, as 
first officer of the "Chesapeake," plying be- 
tween Portland and New York; and within 
six months was appointed Captain. He was 
afterward in charge of the steamer "Fran- 
conia" for nine years, of the "Eleanora" for 
a long time, master of the "Cleopatra," and 
of the " Winthrop " when she made her first 
trips and he has had charge of the steamers 
"Doris," "Rapidan," and "San Antonio," 
while the other boats were being repaired. 
When the company's last and finest steamer, 
the "Manhattan," was finished, Captain Bragg 
was made her master — a position which he has 
held since 1891. The "John Engl is," a new 
steamship now being built by the company, 
will be ready in January, and will be com- 
manded by Captain Bragg. He has never lost 
a boat or a passenger; and the number of his 
friends increases with every trip, his many 
agreeable characteristics drawing people to 
him by an irrestible magnetism. 

March 7, 1861, Captain Bragg was married 
to Rosetta, daughter of Eleazer and Sally 
(Smith) Crowell, of Hyannis, who was born 
August 2, 1843. Mrs. Bragg also belongs to 
an old Hyannis family. Her grandfather, 
Judah Crowell, who was Captain of a coasting- 
vessel, resided in that town, while her father 
was born there. The last-named gentleman 
was one of the early engineers of the Old 
Colony Railroad, and was a resident of Hyan- 
nis during his lifetime. Captain Bragg has 
one son, Albert C, bom March 22, 1863, who 
is a clerk in the Boston & Maine freight office 
at Portland. Captain Bragg votes in the 
ranks of the Republican party. He is a 
member of Ancient Brothers Lodge, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Bellows, and of 
the Pilots' Association, Manhattan Harbor, 
No. 12. In religious belief he and his 
wife are liberal. They have a pleasant home 
at Portland. 




lELVILLE C. STONE, a citizen 
and native of the town of Bridgton, 
was born October 5, 1840, being 
of pioneer antecedents. His 
grandfather, William Stone, an early settler 
of this place, was a farmer by occupation. 
He served in the War of 18 12, holding a Cap- 
tain's commission. Joshua Stone, the father 
of Melville C, was born and lived and died in 
Bridgton, being for many years busily engaged 
in farming. He married Abigail Seaver, a 
daughter of Ebenezer Seaver, her father being 
also a soldier in the War of 1812, and a 
pioneer of Cumberland County, where he took 
up one hundred and sixty acres of wild land, 
from which he redeemed a farm. Mr. and 
Mrs. Joshua Stone reared six children, namely: 
Melville C. ; Marshall; Belle P.; Josephine, 
deceased; R. B. Stone, deceased; and 
Frankie J. Both parents rounded a full 
period of years, the mother passing away in 
1889, and the father in 1895, on August 5, in 
the eighty-second year of his age. 

Melville C. Stone was reared upon the home 
farm, where he was early initiated into the 
various duties that fall to a farmer's son, his 
help, when out of school, being needed by his 
father. He remained on the homestead until 
nineteen years of age, when he went to Law- 
rence, Mass., where he worked lor a while, 
going thence to Worcester, in the same State. 
While there, he enlisted in Company I, 
Twenty-first Massachusetts Volunteer Infan- 
try, being mustered into service August 22, 
1 861. He went to the front with his regi- 
ment, and was an active participant in the 
battles at Roanoke Island and Ncwbern, but, 
being disabled, was obliged to go into the 
hospital, where he remained a year, seriously 
ill a part of the time, being greatly reduced 
in strength, and losing flesh so rapidly that at 
one time he weighed but ninety-five pounds. 
In 1863 Mr. Stone received his discharge, 
after which he returned to the parental roof. 
In January, 1S64, he again enlisted, joining 
the First Maine Battery, which won distinc- 
tion among the brave regiments that took part 
in the engagements at Fort Stevens, in the 
Shenandoah Valley, and afterward at the 
battles of Bolivar Heights and Cedar Creek. 
Mr. Stone continued with his company until 



I 1 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the cessation of hostilities, when in July, 
1865, he was honorably discharged from the 
sen ice. 

He then remained a resident of this county 
until 187S, when he went to Philadelphia, Pa., 
where he was engaged in business ten years. 
In 1888 Mr. Stone purchased his present snug 
farm of fifty acres, on which he has since 
made substantia] improvements. He pos- 
sesses a scientific knowledge of agriculture, 
which he carries on in a systematic and prac- 
tical manner, his estate bearing unmistakable 
evidence of his ability and good management. 
As a citizen, he is held in high regard through- 
out the community in which he resides, being 
an upright, trustworthy man, of prompt and 
decisive character. Politically, he is a stanch 
Republican, and a firm believer in the prin- 
ciples of his party. 



f ^TeORGE WILLIAM YORK, Treas- 
1 '•) I urer of the Maine Central Railroad 

— was born in Portland, Me., May 28, 
1854. His parents were Joseph S. and 
Frances A. (Illsley) York, the former of Fal- 
mouth, Me., the latter of Portland. His pa- 
ternal grandfather was one of the old residents 
of Falmouth, owning a farm in that town, and 
was also Lieutenant of a revenue cutter in the 
harbor for two years. 

Joseph S. York was educated in Falmouth, 
and in early manhood he engaged in the busi- 
ness of sail-making. He was for nearly a 
quarter of a century established on Commer- 
cial Street and Central Wharf, in company 
with a Mr. Adams, under the firm name of 
Adams & York: and they were one of the lead- 
ing sail-making firms in the city. On the 
death of Mr. Adams Mr. York joined his in- 
terests with those of a Mr. Waite, who was 
also extensively engaged in sail-making. 
Some years later this partnership was dis- 
solved, and Mr. York made one of his sons 
his business associate, changing the firm name 
to J . S. York & Son. This firm conducted a 
large business until the death of Mr. York, 
which occurred January 8, 1886. He was 
then fifty-five years old. 

Mr. Joseph S. York was a moving spirit in 
political affairs of this district, and he was 



elected Alderman and Councilman a number 
of times from Ward 1 on the Republican 
ticket. In social affairs also he took an ac- 
tive interest, and was a member of Atlantic 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M. He married Frances 
A. Illsley, a daughter of Theophilus Illsley, an 
old and respected builder of Portland; and 
they had the following children: George 
William; Frederick H., who was his father's 
partner in the sail-making business, and now 
is sole proprietor of the establishment; and 
Frank W., who is Assistant Treasurer of tin- 
Maine Central Road. The mother is still 
living. 

George William York received his educa- 
tion in Portland, graduating from the high 
school at the age of seventeen, in the class of 
1 87 1 . He worked for some time as a clerk, 
and was employed by Loring, Short & Har- 
mon just prior to the beginning of his careei 
as a railroad man. In May, 1876, he ob- 
tained a clerkship in the general ticket office 
of the Maine Central Railroad, under Colonel 
Boothby, general passenger agent, which In- 
retained seven years. In 1883 he was trans- 
ferred to the Treasurer's office, where he was 
book-keeper for some time; in September, 
1883, was elected Auditor; and in January, 
1892, was made Treasurer of the road. He 
has likewise been Treasurer of the Portland, 
Mount Desert & Machias Steamboat Com- 
pany since 1885, and of the Knox & Lincoln 
Railway since December, 1893. Mr. York's 
official positions entail heavy responsibilities, 
and require of their incumbent the highest in- 
tegrity, combined with financial ability. As 
Treasurer of the Maine Central Railroad 
alone, he is obliged to receive and disburse 
enormous sums of money, that being the 
largest corporation in the State, with gross 
earnings of five million dollars. 

On Christmas Day, 1876, Mr. York was 
united in marriage with Miss Nellie E. Rich- 
mond, of Portland, daughter of E. R. Rich- 
mond, of Lynn, Mass. 

In politics Mr. York is a Republican. Ib- 
is an Odd Fellow, belonging to Beacon Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is 
Past Chief Patriarch of Portland Encampment. 
In athletic and military matters he is also in- 
terested, being a member of the Portland Ath- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



letic Club and Bramhal] League; and he was 

Lieutenant in the Portland Cadets, an inde- 
pendent company not attached to the militia. 
Mr. York has a handsome residence on Atlan- 
tic Street, Portland. 




SAMUEL KNIGHT, engaged in the 
hardware business in Bridgton, Me., 
^7 was born in this town, November 4, 
1836, being one of a family of four 
sons and three daughters born to his parents, 
James W. and Nancy Chase Knight. Samuel 
was reared to agricultural labor, remaining 
beneath the parental roof-tree until the spring 
of 1861, when he started out to see something 
of the world, going first to Massachusetts, 
then to De Kalb County, Illinois, where he 
stayed until September 1. 

Returning then to his early home, Mr. 
Knight enlisted as Fourth Sergeant in Com- 
pany E, Twelfth Maine Volunteer Infantry, 
being mustered into service at Camp Berry, 
Portland. The following January the regi- 
ment was sent South, going by steamer to 
New Orleans. With his company Mr. Knight 
subsequently took an active part in many 
engagements, the most notable among them 
being the ones at Pass Manchac, La., Irish 
Bend, and Port Hudson, he being in the 
midst of battle much of the time from May 27 
until July 8, 1863. On July 1, 1864, his 
regiment was transferred to Virginia by 
steamer, landing at City Point on the James 
River, whence they were sent to Washington, 
D.C., and from there to Georgetown, whence 
they proceeded to the Shenandoah Valley, lo- 
cating their camp at Berryville in August. In 
the battles of Winchester and Fisher's Hill 
Mr. Knight did brave service, working with 
his regiment in the valley until October, when 
they were sent to Cedar Creek, where there 
were two encounters with the enemy. The 
regiment was then sent to Camp Russell, 
where the men, their three years' term of en- 
listment having expired, were sent home, re- 
ceiving their discharge in Portland, Me., De- 
cember 7, 1864. 

On his return to Bridgton Mr. Knight was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1872, 
when, leaving the homestead, he purchased a 



farm near by, and continued in his chosen oc- 
cupation for sixteen years. In 1889 he 
bought the store which he has since success- 
fully conducted, carrying an ample stock of 
all articles to be found in a first-class hard- 
ware establishment. In politics he is a stanch 
advocate of the principles of the Republican 
party, and, socially, is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic and of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 

On October 31, 1865, Mr. Knight was 
united in wedlock with Miss Maria Dearborn, 
who has borne him two children; namely, 
Fred C. and Nettie E. 




ILLIAM L. LARRABEE, owning 

and occupying a small and finely 
improved farm at South Portland, 
is a native of Cumberland County, Maine, his 
birth having occurred at Westbrook, Janu 
ary 25, 1826. His grandfather, Benjamin 
Larrabee, Sr. , and his father, Benjamin Larra- 
bee, Jr., were both natives of Portland, his 
father having been born in that city in 1768. 

Benjamin Larrabee, Jr., was reared to agri- 
culture, and, when a young man, removed to 
Westbrook, where he bought some three hun 
died acres of land. He continued general 
farming, in connection with which he carried 
on an extensive lumbering business. He was 
twice married. His first wife, Jane Cobbey, 
bore him eight children, of whom but one is 
living, Mrs. Emma Freeman, widow of Dr. 
S. S. Freeman, who left her three children — 
Mary, George, and Charles. In 1824 our 
subject's father was united in marriage with 
Sarah, daughter of William Lamb; and of the 
four children born of his second union three 
survive: William L. ; David; and Hannah, 
widow of Rufus Fluent, Jr. 

William L. Larrabee accpiired a practical 
education at the Westbrook Seminary, after- 
which he carried on general farming in the 
place of his nativity. In 1858 he purchased 
one hundred acres of land in Gorham, and was 
numbered among the enterprising and prospei 
ous farmers of that town for thirty-three years. 
Disposing of his Gorham farm in 1891, he- 
bought his present farm of twenty-two acres 
in South Portland, which has since been his 



I if, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



home. In politics he is identified with the 
Republican part)-, and dining the years 1875 
and 1876 he was one of the Selectmen of Gor- 
liam. Religiously, he is an attendant of the 
Baptist church. Mr. Larrabee was married 
June 27, 1S52, to Eunice W. , daughter of 
Ruins Fluent, Sr., of Westbrook. She died 
February 27, 1895, leaving one son, John F., 
who was born in Westbrook, April 19, 1853, 
and was married July 10, 1895, to Matie E. 
Williams, of Hcsper, la. lie is a machinist 
and engineer by trade. 



(WZo 



EORGE E. WHITNEY, general 
\ (ST agent of the Boston & Maine and 
Maine Central Railroads at Portland, 
was born in Topsham, Me., April 14, 1852, 
son of Robert P. and Ruth F. (Sprague) 
Whitney. His grandfather Whitney was one 
of the earl)' settlers of Lubec, Me. Me mar- 
ried a Miss Hunter, of Topsham, a member 
of a family distinguished in Revolutionary 
annals; and through her Mr. Whitney is eligi- 
ble as a member of the Sons of the Revolution. 
Robert P. Whitney, the father of George 
E. , was born in Lubec, Me., in October, 1819, 
and settled in Topsham when a young man, 
engaging in the grocery business. He is now 
the oldest merchant in the place, and has been 
Postmaster for twenty-five years. He likewise 
served as Town Clerk for several years. In 
politics he is a Republican, and has taken an 
active share in the work of the party in Maine, 
as Topsham is a prominent lumbering town 
and one of the salient points in a political can- 
vass. He was intimately acquainted with 
Hannibal Hamlin and James G. Blaine. His 
wife, who was born in Topsham in 1824, was 
a daughter of Willis S. Sprague, one of the 
first settlers of that place, a man of influence 
in the earl}- days and Deacon in the Congrega- 
tional church. Mrs. Whitney also was a Con- 
gregationalist. She died in 1868, having 
been the mother of nine children, eight sons 
and one daughter. The five now living are: 
Willis S., of New York City; George E. ; 
Carrie, wife of N. Farrar, of Boston; Charles 
Sumner, a resident of Gardiner, in the employ 
of George F. Hewett ; and Edward L., an em- 
ployee on the Maine Central. 



George E. Whitney received a good educa- 
tion, graduating from the high school at 
Topsham and studying for a while with the 
Rev. Dr. Wheeler, a noted scholar of that 
town. When a boy of eleven, he began to work 
in the railway service during his vacations, 
first as water boy, later as newsboy; and, when 
nineteen years of age, he became a regular 
employee, a brakeman on the Maine Central, 
then the Portland & Kennebec. Four or five 
years later he was made train baggage-master, 
and after some five years of service in that line 
was promoted to the position of conductor, 
making his first run on the night train from 
Boston to Bangor, being subsequently placed 
in charge of the day express from Portland to 
Bangor and Bar Harbor. His courteous and 
obliging manners made for him a great many 
friends, among whom may lie named the Hon. 
James G. Blaine, who was at that time travel- 
ling back and forth a great deal ; anil he also 
became acquainted in this way with General 
Logan, President Arthur, and other noted 
men. 

In 1892, after officiating as conductor for 
thirteen years, Mr. Whitney was appointed to 
the position of great responsibility which he 
now holds, discharging its duties with marked 
efficiency. He has oversight of all the pas 
senger conductors and brakemen on the two 
roads, the cars in the passenger service, and 
full charge of the Union Station at Portland, 
which places a large number of men under his 
supervision. He is a very busy man, and has 
very little time to spare for matters outside of 
his railroad interest, to which he is closely 
devoted. Mr. Whitney is one of the chartei 
members of the Order of Railway Conductors, 
and has been a director since the time of its 
organization. He also belongs to the Maine 
Central Relief Association. 

October 28, 1879, Mr. Whitney was united 
in marriage with Miss Lottie Merrill, of Tops- 
ham, daughter of William 1'. Merrill, a promi- 
nent citizen of that town. 

Mr. Whitney votes in the ranks of the Re- 
publican party, but takes no active part in 
political affairs. He is advanced in the 
degrees of Masonry, belonging to United 
Lodge, No. 8, A. F. & A. M., of Brunswick, 
Me.; St. Paul Chapter of the same place; 




GEORGE E. WHITNEY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIF.YV 



"9 



Portland Council and Portland Commander) - , 
Knights Templar; and has held all the offices 
in the latter, being at present Eminent Com- 
mander. He is also a member of the Order 
of Red Men, and belongs to the Bramhall 
League of Portland. Mr. Whitney and his 
wile attend the First Parish Unitarian Church. 
They have a handsome residence at 12 West- 
cott Street, Portland. 



2)| OLLIS ST. CLAIR, who for many 
—J years has been one of Cumberland's 
S I prosperous and substantial residents, 

was born in Strafford, Orange 
County. Vt., June 13, 18 10, son of John and 
Rhoda (Merrill) St. Clair. 

Mr. St. Clair's father was a native of New 
Hampshire, born January 18, 1778. He was 
a machinist and followed his trade through 
life, his last days being spent in Burlington, 
Vt., where he died July 4, 1S17. He was an 
industrious man and a worthy citizen. His 
wife, Rhoda Merrill, whom he married Sep- 
tember 1 8; 1797, was a native of New Hamp- 
shire. She became the mother of six children, 
as follows: John M., who was born Janu- 
ary 13, 1S00; Cynthia, bom February 24, 
1804; Ebenezer, born May 13, 1806; Thomas 
J., born March 8, 1808; Hollis, the subject of 
this sketch; and Orrilla, born November 22, 
1812. Mr. St. Clair's mother married for her 
second husband Simon Green, by whom she 
had two children, namely: Alpa, who was born 
[anuary 30, 1819; and Alba, bom November 
19, 1820. Of her eight children Hollis is 
the only survivor. 

Mollis St. Clair grew to manhood in Straf- 
ford, Vt., and received a good academic educa- 
tion. When a mere boy he was naturally 
inclined to busy himself in some profitable em- 
ployment ; and he earned his first dollar as a 
helper in some kind of night work, for which 
he received twelve and one-half cents per 
night. After completing his studies at school 
he engaged in teaching. He taught six winter 
terms, four of which were in his own neighbor- 
hood, and during the summer season he was 
employed at the copperas works of Strafford. 
His connection with that industry dated from 
the time he was sixteen years old ; and he be- 



came an expert in the chemical treatment of 
copperas and alum and the manufacture of cop 
peras, a business which he followed as an occu- 
pation for many years. He was offered the 
position of superintendent of the Chemical 
Works in Portland, Me., which he accepted 
under the vehement protestations of his former 
employers; and he remained with the Portland 
concern for six years. He was then selected 
by Congressman Albert Smith to fill the post 
of commissary of the United States corps of 
engineers, which was engaged in surveying 
the north-east boundary between the United 
States and Canada; and for the succeeding two 
years he was quartered in the dense forests of 
Maine. During his sojourn there he saw a 
great deal of wild life and adventure, the 
woods being alive with animals and game of 
every description known in this climate; and 
on one occasion, while walking through the 
woods alone and unarmed, he met a full-grown 
moose, which he at length frightened away by 
his loud and continual screaming. In [841 
he settled in Cumberland, where he bought 
a large farm, a portion of which he still owns; 
and he has since resided in this town. lie 
was a custom-house officer in Portland under 
Buchanan's administration for almost four 
years. 

Mr. St. Clair has been twice married. On 
October 15, 1840, he was united in marriage 
to his first wife, Jane Sturdivant. She was 
born in Cumberland, September 0, 1N17, 
daughter of Ephraim and Rachel Sturdivant, 
who were representatives of old and prominent 
families of Cumberland County. Mrs. Jane 
Sturdivant St. Clair died October 12, 1871, 
leaving two children, namely: Frances Ger- 
trude, who was bom March 18, 1X42, and is 
now living at home; and Herbert, who was 
born February 5, i860, and now resides in 
Atlanta, Ga. On November 3, 1S82, Mr. St. 
Clair wedded for his second wife Jane S. Mer- 
rill, who was born in Cumberland, June 20, 
1836, daughter of John and Sally (Chenery) 
Merrill. Mrs. St. Clair's paternal grand- 
parents, Jacob and Rosanna (Davis) Merrill, 
were early settlers of Pownal ; and the family 
was a prominent one in that neighborhood. 
John Merrill, Mrs. St. Clair's father, was a 
native and lifelong resident of Cumberland, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



where he followed agricultural pursuits. He 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He died August 3, 1881. His wife, 
who was a native of Massachusetts, became 
the mother of six children, two of whom are 
living, namely: Asa, who was horn February 
27, 1826, and resides in Cumberland; and 
Mrs. St. Clair, who is the youngest. Mrs. 
Sally C. Merrill died in 1882. 

Mr. St. Clair lias lived a busy and prosper- 
ous life, his business transactions having all 
been attended with good financial results. He 
served as a Justice of the Peace for forty years, 
but of late years he has retired from the 
more active details of business. He is a Dem- 
ocrat in politics and liberal in his religious 
views. Mrs. St. Clair attends the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



/©> 



EORGE W. SYLVESTER, manager 
VI^T °^ t ' ie Gilbert M. Soule Lumber 
Company, located at 41 S Commercial 
Street, Portland, is a worthy representative of 
the native-born resident of the city, and one 
of its prosperous business men. He was 
born October 17, 1850, the only child of 
George S. and Helen R. (Couch) Sylvester. 
His mother died in 1891; but his father is 
still living, being actively engaged in busi- 
ness in this city. The subject of this notice 
was reared and educated in Portland, being 
graduated from the high school in the class of 
1X69. With the energy characteristic of his 
boyhood days, he soon began business life, 
being employed for a time as clerk in the 
wholesale grocery establishment of Elias 
Thomas & Co. During a subsequent two 
years' engagement with Robert Holyoke, Mr. 
Sylvester became thoroughly acquainted with 
the details of the lumber business; and the 
succeeding two years were spent in the employ 
of Holyoke, Benson & Co., Mr. Sylvester 
leaving them to accept a position with the late 
Gilbert Soule, with whom he remained until 
Mr. Soulc's death ten years later. The pres- 
ent company was then incorporated, and Mr. 
Sylvester appointed to the position of man- 
ager, the duties of which he has filled most 
successfully for the past ten years. In poli- 
tics he is a consistent Republican, and for 



three years — 1887, 1888, and 1889 — he 
served his fellow-citizens as a member of the 
Common Council, representing Ward 5. 

Mr. Sylvester married Miss Luena M., 
daughter of Frank J. and Maria A. Ames: and 
they have a pleasant home at 201 High Street, 
where they give hospitable welcome to their 
numerous friends. They arc earnest be- 
lievers in the truths of Christianity, and wor- 
ship at the Williston Congregational Church. 



OHN A. S. DYER, general merchant, 
Postmaster, and Chairman of the Hoard 
of Selectmen of South Portland, lias 
occupied the last-named position since 
the town was set off from Cape Elizabeth in 
1894. The office of Postmaster he has filled for 
seven years at Knightsville, having been ap 
pointed to the position by President Harrison. 
For sixteen years he has been engaged in mer- 
cantile business, Mr. Levi Seavy having been 
in company with him for six years; but since 
1885 he has managed the store himself, carry- 
ing on a substantial retail business under the 
firm title of J. A. S. Dyer & Co. 

Mr. Dyer is a native-born citizen, his birth 
having occurred March 30, 1861, in Pleasant- 
dale, in what was then called Cape Flizabeth. 
He grew to mature years in the place of his 
nativity, being here educated, and commenced 
his business career when but a mere youth, his 
success therein being solely attributable to his 
own energy and pluck. He is the representa- 
tive of one of the oldest families of the neigh- 
borhood. His paternal grandfather, Jesse 
Dyer, Sr. , who, it is thought, was born here, 
was a well-to-do farmer, settling on a farm 
after his marriage with Mary Brown, who bore 
him several children, among them being a son 
Jesse, who was the father of John A. S. Dyer. 
Jesse Dyer, Jr., has been a lifelong resident 
of Pleasantdale, where he is now living, re- 
tired from active business, a most genial and 
pleasant man of seventy-three years, happy in 
having won the respect of the entire community 
in which he has lived through boyhood, man- 
hood, and old age. For many years he was a 
prominent business man, being engaged as a 
general merchant, also dealing in grain and 
ice, and also for a time extensively engaged in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



manufacturing brick. In politics he has never 
swerved from allegiance to the Democratic 
party. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Martha Jane Fickett, was born, bred, and edu- 
cated in I'ownal, Me., afterward removing to 
Portland, where she met and married Mr. 
Dyer. They subsequently made their perma- 
nent home in Pleasantdale, where she died 
a few years ago. Of the children born to 
them three are dead, namely : Frederick died 
a few years after his marriage with Miss 
Nellie Nutter, of this town ; Edmund A. died 
in early manhood; and one son passed away in 
infancy. The record of the living is as fol- 
lows: Malvern, in the meat business in New- 
ark, N.J., married Miss Ethel Hamilton, for- 
merly of this place; John A. S., is the espe- 
cial subject of this sketch; Walter H., in 
business with his brother John, being junior 
partner, married Miss Eva Gild, of Boothbay, 
this State; and Carrie F., wife of Frank 
Libby, a carpenter in Pleasantdale. 

John A. S. Dyer was united in marriage 
December 29, 1885, to Miss Helen H. Pills- 
bury, who was born and reared in South Port- 
land, being a daughter of the late Albert Pills- 
bury, formerly a conductor on the Grand Trunk 
Railway, and his wife, Louisa (Fickett) Pills- 
bury, who is now living in Pleasantdale. The 
wedded life of Mr. and Mrs. Dyer has been 
enlivened and cheered by the advent of four in- 
teresting children; namely, Ella G., Albert 
L. , Martha, ami Raymond C. 



-OHN C. ROBERTS, the efficient su- 
perintendent of the city almshouse at 
Portland, was born in Waterboro, York 
County, Me., on April 22, 1840, and is 
a son of Major Jerry and Olive (Roberts) 
Roberts. 

His paternal grandfather, Jeremy Roberts, 
served as a private in the Revolutionary War, 
and was among those who fought so valiantly 
at the battle of Bunker Hill. Jerry Roberts, 
whiise birth occurred in the town of Lyman, 
Me., on May 27, 1798, spent the early years 
of his manhood in farming. Later on he con- 
ducted a hotel, and was also engaged in specu- 
lations of various kinds, especially in lumber; 
and he owned one or more saw-mills. He held 



various town offices, and in the years 1868 
and 1869 he represented the towns of Water- 
boro and Limerick in the State legislature. 
He died on July 24, 1874. His wife, Olive 
Roberts, was born on February 28, 1 80S, ami 
died on July 15, 1870. She was a daughter 
of Andrew J. Roberts and grand-daughter of 
Ichabod Roberts. Her uncle, Moses Roberts, 
served in the French and Indian War, in that 
contest losing his life. Mrs. Olive Roberts 
bore her husband nine children, of whom seven 
are now living, namely: Harriet Stone, the 
wife of William H. Johnson; Martha F. , who 
married Horace Hamilton, anil is now residing 
in Kansas; Albert H., who is married and 
occupies the old homestead; John C. ; Lucy 
H., now Mrs. Jason II. Shaw, of Portland; 
Luther B., a stock-broker in Portland; and 
Olive J., who married Elliot Dearborn. 

John C. Roberts obtained his education in 
the public schools of Waterboro, Me., finish 
ing his course of study in the high school, 
after which he assisted his father in farm work 
at home until he was nineteen years old. At 
that time he went to Lynn, Mass., to learn the 
morocco dresser's trade; and after completing 
his apprenticeship he remained in Lynn and 
engaged in that vocation for six years. Re- 
turning to Waterboro, he entered a union store ; 
but after three years he again went to Massa- 
chusetts to superintend a department in a mo- 
rocco shop in Beverly, and continued in that 
position for four years. In 1S78 he estab 
lished himself in trade in Portland, Me., and 
during the succeeding ten years did a prosper- 
ous business. Then selling out he entered the 
employ of Libby & Larrabee, and for five 
years had charge of their fumishing-goods de- 
partment. Since the spring of 1893, when 
he was elected by the Board of Overseers, he- 
has served most acceptably as superintendent 
of the city almshouse. 

His wife, formerly Miss Sarah A. West- 
wood, a daughter of James and Sarah (Moss) 
Westwood, is a native of London, England. 
Three children have been born to them, 
namely: Harry C. and Lillian W., both of 
whom died in childhood; and Henrietta W. , 
the only one living. In political views Mr. 
Roberts is a strong Republican; and in 18S5- 
86 and 1886-87 he served as Councilman of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Ward 7 in Portland. Since 1867 he has 
been affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, and 
is now a member of Portland Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M. lie is also connected with Cogowosco 
Tribe of Red Men. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts 
are active members of the West Congrega- 
tional Church of Portland. 



ri . WILLIAM FENDERSON 
'ERRY, who has for many years 
been closely identified with the 
leading enterprises of Bridgton, 
Cumberland County, is a native-born citizen, 
the date of his birth being February 1, 1826. 
His father, George Perry, was born in Lim- 
erick, York County, this State, and was but 
seven years old when his father died. His 
widowed mother afterward became the wife of 
Elijah Allen, a Revolutionary soldier and a 
blacksmith by trade. As George grew to man- 
hood he learned the blacksmith's trade from 
his step-father, and in 1820 came to Bridg- 
ton, where he carried on his trade in the 
village for a while. He afterward purchased a 
tract of land about two miles from the centre of 
the town, and there engaged in blacksmithing 
until his demise at the age of seventy-three 
years. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Eliza Fenderson, was born in Parsonsfield, Me., 
being a daughter of William Fenderson, a vet- 
eran of the Revolution also. She survived her 
husband about two years, dying at the age of 
seventy-three. She reared eight of her eleven 
children, William F., the subject of this 
sketch, being the only one now living. 

William F. Perry attended the district 
schools of his native town, in the mean time, 
from the age of seven to fourteen years, assist- 
ing on the farm. He then began working at 
the forge with his father, continuing with him 
until twenty-one years old, when he started 
out lor himself, even with the world. Going 
to Portland, Mr. Perry found employment at his 
trade, receiving three dollars and fifty cents 
per week and his board. After four months 
lie returned to Bridgton, where he formed a 
partnership and engaged in blacksmithing. 
In a short time Mr. Perry purchased his part- 
ner's interest, and conducted the business 
alone for four years. Selling that shop he- 



then formed a copartnership with Amasa H. 
Merrill, and bought of James M. Kimball a 
carriage factory, which he and his partner con- 
ducted until the death of Mr. Merrill four 
years later. Mr. Perry then purchased Mr. 
Merrill's interest from the latter's heirs, and 
carried on a prosperous business until 1858, 
when he sold out, being engaged for the next 
two years in lumber dealing. In i860, in 
company with George Taylor, he bought a 
water-power, which they improved, subse- 
quently building the Forest Mills, in which 
they engaged in the manufacture of woollen 
goods. After the death of Mr. Taylor, No- 
vember 30, 1879, a stock company was formed, 
being incorporated under the name of the 
Forest Mills Company, of which Mr. Perry 
was elected President, a responsible office, 
which he has since most capably filled. In 
addition to the woollen factory, this enterpris- 
ing company also owns and operates a saw and 
planing mill, where they are extensively en- 
gaged in the manufacture of boxes, building 
material, etc. Mr. Perry holds other impor- 
tant positions, being President of the Bridgton 
& Saco Railway Company, and interested with 
others in many of the industries in this town. 
On October 31, 1859, Mr. Perry was united 
in marriage to Miss Maria Gibbs, the only 
child of their union being a daughter, Adeline 
G. Mrs. Perry was born in Bridgton, being 
a daughter of the Hon. Rufus and Adaline 
(Sears) Gibbs, a sketch of whose lives may be 
found elsewhere in this volume, in connection 
with the history of Charles E. Gibbs. Mrs. 
Perry, a woman of true Christian worth, is a 
member of the Congregational church. Mr. 
Perry has been a Republican since the forma- 
tion of that party and a stanch supporter of its 
principles. He has twice represented his con- 
stituents in the State legislature, in the years 
1872 and 1873, serving with credit to himself 
and to the honor of his party. 



AMUEL H. JOSE, a "prominent 

builder and contractor of Portland, 
Me., has been a resident of this 
city since 185 1, and during the 
time has been actively associated with its 
business interests. He was born December 




BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



123 



16, 1832, at Hollis, now Dayton, this State, 
his parents beiiiL^ William, Jr., and Eunice 
(Huff) Jose. Mr. Jose's paternal grandfather, 
William Jose, Sr., was one of three brothers 
that came to Maine at an early date. He lo- 
cated in Saco, York County, where he cleared 
and improved a farm, and likewise, having 
learned the carpenter's trade, built many of 
the earlier houses of that place. 

William Jose, Jr., was born in 1798 in 
Saco. During his early manhood he there 
worked at the trades of a carpenter and wheel- 
wright; but soon after his marriage to Miss 
Huff, who was also born ami reared in Saco, 
he removed to Hollis, where he carried on 
general farming for some years. Subsequently 
returning to the place of his nativity, he set- 
tled on the old homestead of his father-in-law, 
Joseph Huff, living there until his death, 
which occurred in 1868. His wife, who sur- 
vived him till August, 1S94, reached the ven- 
erable age of ninety-five years, her birth hav- 
ing occurred in June, 1799. Both were con- 
sistent members of the Free-will Baptist 
church. They had a family of five children, 
namely: Sarah, who married Samuel Harmon, 
of Buxton, Me.; William, who died at the age 
of forty-two years; Samuel H.; Martha E., 
wife of Lucius Thayer, of Mechanic Falls, 
this State; and Mrs. Fanny E. Bussell, wife 
of George Buzzell, of Connecticut. 

Samuel H. Jose received his education in 
the common schools of Saco, after which he 
served an apprenticeship at the carpenter's 
trade with Francis Low, of that town. In the 
fall of 1850 Mr. Jose was engaged at his trade 
in Portland for a few weeks, being so much 
pleased with the city that he settled here 
permanently the following spring. For two 
years thereafter he worked as a journeyman, 
then, with characteristic enterprise, started 
in business for himself, being at first his own 
architect, as well as builder. Many of the 
most important public buildings and private 
residences of the city have been constructed 
under his immediate supervision, among 
which may be mentioned the Jose Building, 
now Danforth Block, William E. Gould's 
residence, and Kotczhman Hall. During the 
forty-two years in which Mr. Jose has been en- 
gaged in contracting and building he has paid 



out a large sum of money in wages, thus giv- 
ing support to many families, having at times 
as many as forty men in his employ. He is 
an able financier, making wise investments of 
his money, dealing somewhat in city real es- 
tate, and is at the present time the owner of 
seven houses which he has erected. He has a 
very comfortable dwelling at 24 Bramhall 
Street, having built it in 1867, before very 
many people had recognized the desirability of 
this section of the city as a residential place. 

Mr. Jose has been three times married. 
His first wife, Mary C. Goud, daughter of the 
Rev. Robert Goud, died, leaving four chil- 
dren, namely: Samuel H., Jr., who died when 
seventeen years old; Edward C, of Boston, 
Mass. ; Charles F. and George C, both with 
their father. His second wife, Clara Sawyer, 
lived but a short time after their marriage, 
dying without issue. Mr. Jose was subse- 
quently united in marriage with Mrs. Maria 
M. (Millett) Andrews, a daughter of Joel 
Millett, a farmer. She is a woman of many 
estimable qualities, and an active worker in 
the Free-will Baptist church, of which both 
herself and husband are conscientious mem- 
bers. In politics Mr. Jose is a steadfast Re- 
publican. 



"^ENJAMIN F. HALL, a practical 
farmer and substantial citizen of 
-) * West Falmouth, Me., was born in 
this town, September I, 1824, son of 
George and Elizabeth (Hall) Hall. 

This branch of the Hall family have been 
residents of Falmouth from the time of Mr. 
George Hall's grandfather, Hatevil Hall, who 
followed farming, and was the owner of a 
large amount of land in the immediate vicin- 
ity. His son, Andrew Hall, eventually came 
into possession of a portion of this land, and 
in early manhood was engaged as a mill 
sawyer in addition to farming. Andrew Hall 
married Miss Jane Merrill, of Falmouth, Me., 
who died on December 30, 1826. He died 
August 31, 1 83 1, at eighty-one years of age. 
They had ten children, all of whom have 
passed away. 

George Hall, son of Andrew and Jane 
(Merrill) Hall, was reared to farm life, and, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



on starting out for himself, chose agriculture 
as his vocation. The farm he purchased is a 
portion of the original estate of Hatevil Hall, 
and he was there successfully engaged in gen- 
eral farming during the active years of his 
life. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Elizabeth Hall, bore him seven children, 
three of whom are still living, namely: Sarah, 
i he wile of Joseph McDonald, of Gray, Me.; 
Andrew Merrill Hall, residing at Cumberland 
Mills, Me.; and Benjamin F. Hall, of this 
sketch. In political views their father was a 
Democrat, but never served in public office. 
lie was an attendant of the Baptist church. 

Benjamin F. Hall in his early years at- 
tended the public school of Falmouth, now 
West Falmouth; and, after completing his 
course of study, he engaged in farming with 
his father during the summer, and in the 
winter he worked at teaming. He remained 
with his father until he was thirty years of 
age, then purchased the old John Marston 
place in West Falmouth, where he still re- 
sides. This farm contains about one hundred 
acres of woodland and meadow, and produces 
about sixty tons of hay yearly. He keeps 
three to four horses and about eighteen head 
of cattle. Since he bought the property he 
has made substantial improvements, not only 
in the land, having brought a portion of the 
pasturage under cultivation, but also in the 
buildings. He has built a new house and 
bam, and made additions and improvements 
in the out-buildings, so that all about the 
I dace are evidences of thrift and enterprise. 

In 1854 Mr. Hall was joined in marriage 
with Miss Mary R. Brackett, a daughter of 
Dr. Samuel Brackett, of Falmouth, Me. 
Their home was blessed and brightened by the 
birth of a son and daughter, both of whom are 
living: Mary T. is the wile of Jerry Martin, 
of Dorchester, Mass.; and George L. Hall is 
associated with his father in the milk busi- 
ness. He served as Selectman of West Fal- 
mouth in 1892 and [893. Mrs. Mary R. Hall 
died in March 12, 1883. 

Mr. Hall is an adherent of the Democratic 
party, and has often been chosen to fill posi- 
tions of public trust. Between the years 1 SOS 
and 1SS1 he held the office of Selectman nine 
years, one term of four years, another of three 



years, and a third of two years, and during 
seven years of that time he was Chairman of 
the Board. Besides this he has served as 
Town Agent seven or eight years; and as 
Auditor of Accounts for a long term. lie- 
was President and a Director of the Falmouth 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company for twenty- 
five years. 




ILLIAM WALLACE THOMAS, 
M.D., who occupies a conspicuous 
position among the leading physi- 
cians of this part of Cumberland County, has 
an extensive and valuable practice in the town 
of Yarmouth, where he has been actively en- 
gaged for a quarter of a century, a longer 
period of time than any other physician, with 
the exception of Dr. Bates. Dr. Thomas is a 
native of Maine, having been born, June 4, 
1838, in Oxford, Oxford County, son of 
George W. Thomas. 

His paternal grandfather, Holmes Thomas, 
a native of Kingston, Mass., was an early 
settler of Oxford County; and there he worked 
industriously at farming and shoemaking for 
many years. He died in Dixfield, at the age 
of fourscore and three years. He was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary War, being with 
General Washington at White Plains, where 
he served as Assistant Quartermaster. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Lucy Church- 
ill, also lived to the age of eighty-three years. 
They had a family of six sons and four daugh 
ters, the Doctor's father being the youngest 
child. 

George W. Thomas was a native of Oxford, 
formerly called Hebron, his birth occurring 
April 20, 1 80 1. He spent his life in agri- 
cultural pursuits, having an excellently culti- 
vated farm in Oxford, which continued his 
abiding-place throughout his seventy-five years 
of useful life. He was ever held in deep re- 
spect by his neighbors and friends, being 
identified with the best interests of the place. 
He was a Whig in politics, and a consistent 
member of the Baptist church, which he liber- 
ally assisted in supporting. He married Mar- 
garet Ann Blankenburg, who was born March 
15, 1808, in Portland, and survived his death 
a few years, passing away in 1886. The ten 



DIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



I2S 



children born to them are all now living; 
namely, George W., Simeon P., Cyrus K., 
William Wallace, Helen M., Robert C. and 
Mary C. (twins), John F., Adelaide C, and 
Leonora H. 

Dr. William W. Thomas grew to manhood 
beneath the parental roof, working on the farm 
during seed-time and harvest, and attending 
the district school in the winter seasons. 
When twenty years of age, he struck out for 
himself, going to Massachusetts, where he was 
hired as a farm laborer by George D. Hough- 
ton, and received for his wages fifteen dollars 
a month. In 1862 he enlisted in Company I, 
Twenty-third Maine Volunteer Infantry, being 
made ( hderly Sergeant of the company. At 
the expiration of his nine months' term of en- 
listment he was honorably discharged from 
the service, and returned to the place of his 
nativity. The following three years he pur- 
sued his studies at Old Hebron Academy, 
after which he spent three years with Dr. 
Josiah Carr in Mechanic Falls, reading medi- 
cine, paying his expenses by teaching school, 
and likewise attending lectures at the Maine 
Medical School, which is connected with 
Bowdoin College in Brunswick, receiving his 
diploma from that well-known institution in 
1S69. In 1870 Dr. Thomas came to Yar- 
mouthville, where he has met with eminent 
success, his intellectual attainments and pro- 
fessional skill winning for him the confidence 
and esteem of people in all ranks of life. In 
politics the Doctor is a stanch Republican. 
He served for four years on the School Board 
during his residence in Oxford, and for an 
equal length of time in this town, which, to- 
gether with North Yarmouth in the years 1877 
and 1S79, he represented in the State legisla- 
ture. He is a Grand Army of the Republic 
man, belonging to W. L. Haskell Post, No. 
108, in Yarmouth. 

On June 20, 1877, Dr. Thomas was united 
in marriage with Clara M. Smith, who was 
born in Lisbon, Androscoggin County, being 
a daughter of the late Jerome W. Smith and 
his wife, formerly Eliza Porter, of Freeport. 
Dr. and Mrs. Thomas have two sons, namely: 
Roy W., who was born April 3, 1878, now in 
Bowdoin College; and Dean Stanley, born 
July 31, 1887. Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Thomas's 



mother, makes her home with the Doctor's 
family, living in her own house. Dr. Thomas 
and his estimable wife attend the First Con- 
gregational Church, but are progressive and 
liberal in their religious belief, realizing that 

"True salvation is to live the life divine, 
And that heaven is now and ever where true love and 
troodness shine." 




ORACE H. SHAW, one of the lead- 
ing shoe manufacturers in the State 
of Maine, was born in Hampden, 
Penobscot County, February 18, 
1842, son of Abiel and Dorcas Elizabeth 
(Philbrook) Shaw. His father was a son of 
William Shaw, of Frankfort, Me., and was for 
many years engaged in farming in Hampden. 
His mother was a daughter of Moses Phil- 
brook, also a resident of that town. 

Horace H. Shaw's boyhood was spent on his 
father's farm, where work was plenty and edu- 
cational facilities were few. In his sixteenth 
year, having won his father's consent that he 
should obtain an education by his own efforts, 
he began to earn his own living; and by work- 
ing summers and teaching school in the winter 
he procured means to fit himself for college. 
In the summer of 1862 he was prepared to 
enter college; but, under the call of President 
Lincoln for "three hundred thousand more," 
he enlisted in Company F, Eighteenth Regi- 
ment Maine Volunteers, was mustered as First 
Sergeant, and was promoted to Second Lieu- 
tenant in January, 1863. His alertness in 
the discharge of his duty and soldierly bearing 
in action won him favor with his superior 
officers; and he was next detached as an Aide- 
de-camp to the brigade commander, and dur- 
ing his service in that capacity was assigned 
to duty as ordnance officer and inspector of 
artillery. The following summer he was pro- 
moted to the rank of First Lieutenant. 

In 1863 his regiment, the Eighteenth 
Maine, was changed to the First Regiment 
Maine Heavy Artillery, and was in some of 
the severest actions of the war. In the cam- 
paign of 1864 he acted as Aide-de-camp to the 
brigade commander, and was in the battles 
of Spottsylvania, North Anna, Hanover Court- 
house, Totopotomy Creek, Cold Harbor, and 



126 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Petersburg, being in active service from May, 
1864, to September, 1865. In February, 
1864, he was commissioned Captain, but de- 
clined muster. In the last campaign of 1865 
he was ordered to the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment, Third Division Second Army Corps, 
charged with important and critical duty. 
Mr. Shaw was at the capture of Petersburg, 
the battles at Sailor's Creek, Farmville, Rice's 
Station, and High Bridge, and was present at 
the surrender of Lee at Appomattox. He was 
retained in service when the army was dis- 
banded, and ordered on June 15 to Fort Baker, 
Md., with a remnant of his regiment, which 
was consolidated with the Third, Fourth, 
Seventeenth, and Nineteenth Maine Regi- 
ments. He was brigade. Quartermaster from 
June 16 to September 5, 1865, when he was 
mustered out of service with his regiment. 

During the whole of his brilliant military 
career it had been his intention to return to 
college when his term of service was ended ; 
but the intense activity of his later army life 
had unfitted him for a student, and he com- 
menced business as a grocer in his native 
town, associating himself with another gentle- 
man, under the firm name of Shaw & Smith. 
After a very successful year he sold out, and 
went to Boston to study law, preparatory to 
entering a larger field. In February, 1867, 
he entered the employ of C. H. Breed & Co., 
shoe manufacturers of Portland, as a salesman. 
In company with A. VValden he succeeded 
this firm in 1871 as Walden & Shaw, and in 
1873 organized the firm of Shaw, Goding & 
Co., which did the leading business in the 
State in their line up to 1S93. In 1886 Mr. 
Shaw established a large and successful shoe 
industry at Freeport, Me., under the style of 
A. W. Shaw & Co., and in 1895 bought out a 
plant at Lewiston, Me., and established there 
one of the largest factories in the State. He 
is now also largely engaged in the manu- 
facture of shoes in Portland, and has an office 
in Boston, and business in nearly every por- 
tion of the United States. 

Politically, a Republican, he has served in 
the city government and in the State legisla- 
ture; and he was chosen elector-at-large, and 
made President of the Electoral College, cast- 
ing the vote of the State for Benjamin Harri- 



son in 1888. In religion a Methodist, he is a 
member of the Congress Street Church, and 
was delegate from Maine to the Second 
CEcumenical Conference in Washington in 
1 89 1 ; and he is a Trustee of the Maine Wes- 
leyan Seminary and Female College, and has 
done good work for the institution. He has 
done much for the part of the city of Portland 
where he resides, and has been active in pro- 
moting all forward movements for the good of 
the various places where he has had interests. 
He married in August, 1S67, Celeste M. 
Gay, daughter of William and Rhoda Gay, of 
East Corinth, Me. They have one daughter, 
Mrs. Anabel Shaw Smart, well known in Port- 
land literary circles, and one son, Winfield I.. 
Shaw, who at this writing, 1896, is aged 
seventeen years, preparing for Harvard Col- 
lege (Portland High School, class 1896), and 
is Major, commanding the battalion High 
School Cadets. 



<*♦•-* 



ESSE DYER, as a manufacturer, mer- 
chant, and dealer in real estate, has 
long been identified with the business 
interests and industries of that part of 
Cape Elizabeth that is now called South Port- 
land, which is the place of his nativity, the 
date of his birth being November 29, 1823. 
He is of honored pioneer stock, his great- 
grandparents having resided here for many 
years. 

Christopher Dyer, of the next generation, 
was a sea-faring man, sailing in the Cuban 
trade. On one of his voyages to the West 
Indies he was taken sick, died, and was 
buried in the sea. He was a man of exceed- 
ing thrift and enterprise, accumulating con- 
siderable money, which he invested in land in 
this town. He was a stanch member of the 
Whig party, and quite liberal in his religious 
views. He married and reared a family of 
four children, among them being Jesse Dyer, 
Sr., father of the gentleman whose name ap- 
pears at the head of this sketch. 

Jesse Dyer, Sr., was born July 15, 1780, on 
the homestead of his parents in Cape Eliza- 
beth, and was reared to agricultural labors. 
In his mature life becoming the practical 
manager of the estate left by his father, he 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



i 27 



built a grist and carding mill, and operated 

both in conjunction with farming. He like- 
wise cut a great deal of wood, supplying many 
of the brickyards of this locality with fuel, 
lie married Mary, daughter of Joseph Brown, 
of Scarboro; and they became the parents of 
eight children, the following being recorded 
of them : George, who is dead, left one daugh- 
ter, Henrietta; Stephen, deceased, left two 
children; Christopher, deceased, left three 
children; Mrs. Elmira Fickett died, leaving 
two children; Mrs. Mary Hatch, deceased, 
left two children; Jesse is the special subject 
of this sketch; Columba and Hester (twins), 
both died, the former leaving three children, 
and the latter, who married a Mr. Gray, left 
but one child. 

Jesse Dyer is the only surviving child of 
his parents. He was educated in the common 
schools of Cape Elizabeth, and, when quite 
young, began working as helper in putting up 
a telegraph line between Boston and New 
York, after which he became a section boss 
on the Portland, Saco & Portsmouth Railway, 
remaining with that company for about six 
years. He was next employed in the same 
capacity on the Kennebec Railway, remaining 
with that company for fourteen years, with the 
exception of two years, when he was engaged 
in the grocery business at Cape Elizabeth 
depot, where in 1855 he was appointed Post- 
master, having the office in his store. In 
1857 he sold out his store, and resumed work 
on the railway. Subsequently, in company 
with his brother George, Mr. Dyer started a 
brickyard in this town, under the firm name 
of Dyer Brothers, continuing awhile, when 
Jesse bought out his brother's share of the 
business, which he conducted alone for many 
years. He built up a large trade, furnishing 
brick for many buildings, including the Port- 
land Kerosene Oil Works, Hyde's Oil Fac- 
tory, the North School building, and many 
others. Although he never served an appren- 
ticeship, Mr. Dyer picked up a good knowl- 
edge of the mason's trade, in which he did a 
great deal of very successful work, taking con- 
tracts for building foundations and cellars, in 
this capacity laying the foundation wall for 
the Brown Hill Church in this town. Mr. 
Dyer, whose energy, enterprise, and ability 



were untiring, also speculated extensively in 
real estate, buying land and erecting houses, 
making the brick, laying the foundations, and 
with the assistance of unskilled laboring men 
doing the carpentry, his transactions in this 
line also being most successful. 

In 1S74 Mr. Dyer established himself in a 
new business, building a dam and erecting 
an ice-house at Cape Elizabeth. In that year 
he cut a good deal of ice, but had hard work 
to compete with the ice firms of Portland, the 
citizens fearing his crop would not hold out 
through the season. The following year, 
however, his business had so increased that he 
admitted Norris Curtis to partnership; and 
under the firm name of Dyer & Curtis they es- 
tablished an office in Portland, continuing to- 
gether three years. In 1878 Mr. Dyer built a 
store and grist-mill at Cape Elizabeth, and also 
engaged in the hay and grain business, build- 
ing up a large local trade, conducting it until 
1889, when he sold out to E. Matthews. At 
Knightsville Mr. Dyer then built an ice- 
house, with a capacity of two thousand tons; 
and that winter his ice crop was thirty-five 
hundred tons, all of which he sold to New 
York parties, loading one vessel with two 
thousand two hundred and seventeen tons, the 
largest shipment at that time ever made from 
Portland. He afterward sold his ice plant 
and privileges, and in 1892 went into the hay 
and grain business again, taking as a partner 
a Mr. Jordan, who purchased the business in 
1894. 

Mr. Dyer, while attending to his own inter- 
ests, has ever been mindful of the welfare 
of his native town, giving material aid to 
schemes for local improvement, and contribut- 
ing the land for a street, which is now called 
Evans Street. He is a stanch Democrat in 
his political affiliations, but not an aspirant 
for official honors. 

Mr. Dyer has been twice married, his first 
wife, whom he wedded on October 14, 1851, 
having been Martha J., daughter of Nathaniel 
Fickett, of Danville, Me. She passed to 
the higher life May 1, 1890, leaving four 
children, of whom a record may be found 
in connection with the sketch of John A. S. 
Dyer, the second child in order of birth. On 
December 18, 1891, Mr. Dyer was united in 



128 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



marriage with Mrs. Addie L. (Bean) Swain, a 
native of Wilton, the daughter of Joshua Bean 
and the widow of the late Nathan Swain. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Dyer are people of strong 
religious principles, and sincere members of 
the Methodist church. 




UGUSTUS ERVIN STEVENS, who 
died on November 10, 1882, was a 
prominent merchant of Portland and 
an ex-mayor of the city. He was 
born in Westbrook (now Deering), September 
25, 1825, son of Samuel 13. and Sally Briscoe 
(Francis) Stevens, and on the maternal side 
was related to the famous Paul Revere. Mr. 
Stevens was the oldest of a family of six, one 
of whom died in infancy. The others are as 
follows: Samuel H., who was agent of the 
Boston & Maine Railroad in 1882; Granville 
M., agent of the Fibre Ware Company; Frank 
G., registrar of deeds for Cumberland County; 
and Mrs. Starr, wife of Judge Starr, of Illi- 
nois. 

Their father, Samuel B. Stevens, was a de- 
scendant of Benjamin Stevens, who purchased 
a piece of land of Isaac Sawyer in Back Cove, 
in 1738. Benjamin Stevens married Martha 
Sawyer, and had a son, Isaac Sawyer Stevens, 
who was born September 17, 1748, and died 
October 23, 1820. He was a Sergeant in the 
Revolutionary War. Isaac Sawyer Stevens 
married Sarah Brackett, who was born October 
17, 1748, and died February 23, 1830. She 
was the daughter of Zachariah Brackett, fifth 
son of Zachariah Brackett and Judith Sawyer. 
Isaac S. and Sarah (Brackett) Stevens had 
a son, Zachariah Brackett Stevens, who was 
born November 20, 1 778, and died May 15, 
1856. He married Miriam Bailey, who was 
bom in 1778, and died December 13, 1865. 

Samuel B. Stevens, son of Zachariah B. and 
Miriam (Bailey) Stevens, was an old and re- 
spected merchant of Portland. His wife, 
Sally Briscoe Francis, who was born Novem- 
ber 11, 1799, and died July 6, 1890, traced 
her ancestry back to the De Rivoires, a family 
of noble lineage, who came originally from 
Romagnieu, Vienne, and Saint-Jean, in the 
south-eastern part of France. Certain mem- 
bers of the family, who were Huguenots, fled 



from France after the revocation of the Edict 
of Nantes. The genealogy runs as follows: 
"Jean de Rivoire married Magdeleine Mala- 
perge ; and they had a son Isaac, who was mar- 
ried in 1694 to Serenne Lambert. Their son 
Apollos, who was born in 1702, became a resi- 
dent of Boston when about thirteen years of 
age, and was apprenticed to a silversmith. 
He changed his name to Paul Revere, because 
the English tongue had trouble in pronouncing 
it in its original form, Apollos de Rivoire. 
Paul Revere, first, died in 1754. He married 
in 1729 Deborah Hitchborn, of Boston; and 
they had twelve children,- the third being Paul. 
A daughter, Mary Revere, married first Ed- 
mund Rose, second Alexander Baker. She 
had three children — Mary, Sarah, and Philip. 
The latter died at sea. Mary, daughter of 
Edmund and Mary (Revere) Rose, married 
Caleb Francis ; and they reared five children — 
Mary, Isabel, Sally Briscoe (Mrs. Samuel B. 
Stevens), Maria, and Harriet." 

Augustus Ervin Stevens received a good 
education in the common schools and the semi- 
nary at Westbrook, and then began the work 
of life as a clerk in the establishment of Day 
& Lyon, who were in the paper business on 
Exchange Street, Portland. Subsequently he 
entered the employ of Tinkham & Foss, whole- 
sale grocers, with whom his father was asso- 
ciated in business; and he next formed a part- 
nership with the Hon. John Lynch, under the 
firm name of Lynch & Stevens, for years con- 
ducting a thriving wholesale grocery trade. Mr. 
Stevens's next venture was in the iron trade, 
in company with Mr. Little, their business 
being transacted under the style of Little & 
Stevens. Later the firm name was changed to 
A. E. Stevens & Co., a name which for many 
years has been prominent in the mercantile 
annals of Portland. Mr. Stevens was success- 
ful in all his business operations, and accumu- 
lated considerable property. He established 
a reputation for unblemished integrity in all 
his dealings ; and, as an instance of his straight- 
forward business ways, it may be mentioned 
that a neighboring firm offered to pay him for 
the wear and tear of his wharf occasioned by 
their teams, and he refused, saying that it be- 
longed to him to keep the wharf in repair. 
He was a Director of the Casco Bank, the first 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



129 



Treasurer of the Portland & Ogdensburg Rail- 
road, and Treasurer of the Westbrook Semi- 
nary; and he held office in several benevolent 
institutions. 

In politics he was a stanch Republican. 
He was in political office only two years, 
1866-67, but during those two years held the 
highest office within the gift of the city, being 
Mayor of Portland. The first year he ran 
against A. K. Shurtleff, the Democratic can- 
didate, and received two thousand two hundred 
and nineteen votes, his adversary receiving 
but nine hundred and thirty-four, with one 
hundred and thirty-two scattering. During 
his Mayoralty the great fire occurred, and he 
was nearly prostrated by the care it imposed 
upon him. The next year he was re-elected 
by a vote of one thousand six hundred and 
three to seven hundred and fifty-seven. Mr. 
Stevens died November 10, 1S82, of heart dis- 
ease. He was sitting in his easy-chair in the 
parlor of his home, 97 Spring Street, talking 
with his eldest son while awaiting the tea bell, 
when his head suddenly fell backward. He 
gave a few gasps, and all was over. He was 
a citizen that Portland could ill afford to lose 
— a thorough gentleman, kind, considerate, 
benevolent, and withal a competent business 
man. 

Mr. Stevens was twice married. His first 
wife was Jane Tyler, daughter of the late 
Samuel Tyler, of Portland. She was the 
mother of four daughters and two sons ; namely, 
Samuel A., Almena, Mary Fletcher, Eliza- 
beth Tyler, Julia Francis, and Paul Revere. 
Samuel A. and Paul Revere are conducting 
the business established by their father, using 
the old firm name. Samuel A. Stevens mar- 
ried Harriet P., daughter of Z. James and Mary 
Jane (Pennewell) Belt, of Wilmington, Del. ; 
and they have one daughter, Janet. They are 
attendants of St. Luke's Episcopal Church. 
Paul R. Stevens married Lena H., daughter 
of George and Annie (Hayes) Goldthwaite, of 
Boston ; and they have one son, Burrows 
Goldthwaite Stevens. They attend the Uni- 
tarian church. By his second wife, Mary 
Maling, daughter of Captain Moses C. Maling, 
of Kennebunk, Mr. Stevens had one son, 
Ervin Maling Stevens, who lives with his 
mother. 



ir\ AVID LAWRENCE, of West Gray, 
I I Cumberland County, Me., a success- 
^ Jl^J ful farmer and a veteran of the Civil 
War, was born in the town of Gray, 
January 22, 1823. His parents were Ephraim, 
Jr., and Fanny (Small) Lawrence; and his 
paternal grandfather was Ephraim Lawrence, 
Sr. , a native of Groton, Mass., whose ances- 
tors were of English descent, he being a near 
relative of the Hon. Amos and the Hon. 
Abbott Lawrence, prominent citizens of Massa- 
chusetts in the early part of the present 
century. 

Ephraim Lawrence, Sr. , married Sarah Sar- 
telle, a native of Pepperell, Mass. ; and they 
removed to the State of Maine about 1802, 
living for a while in Harrison and Otisfield, 
Cumberland County, and later removing to 
Gray, where they passed the remainder of their 
lives. Ephraim Lawrence, Sr. , was an indus- 
trious farmer, and an honest, upright, and use- 
ful citizen. He had a brother Asa who was 
a Captain in the Revolutionary War. 

Ephraim Lawrence, Jr., father of David, 
was born in Groton, Mass., April 9, 1793, and 
came to Maine with his parents in 1802. He 
was reared to agricultural pursuits, and, when 
a young man, settled on a farm in West Gray, 
where he resided for several years, and later 
purchased the farm now occupied by his son 
David. He conducted farming prosperously, 
and also engaged in lumbering; and he con- 
tinued to pursue these industries nearly up to 
the time of his death, which took place Sep- 
tember 20, 1874. His energy and capacity as 
a farmer and business man were of a high 
order; and he occupied a prominent position 
among the leading men of the town, holding 
the office of Selectman for several years, and 
serving as a Republican member of the legis- 
lature of i860. He was also a Justice of the 
Peace for many years, and during his life 
settled many estates and did a large amount of 
business pertaining to that office. He was 
pre-eminently a self-made man, having at- 
tended school but six weeks; but by hard study 
nights and spare moments he accpiired a fair 
business education. He was especially noted 
for his genial and charitable disposition, and 
was a friend to all. His wife, Fanny Small, 
who died on November 25, 1861, was born in 



'3° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Gray, January 25, 1796, and was the daughter 
11I Isaac and Susan (Hobbs) Small. Her 
grandparents were among the earliest settlers 
in Gray, and her parents were natives of the 
town where they were lifelong residents. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ephraim Lawrence, Jr., were 
the parents of fourteen children, namely: 
Sarah, who married William G. Orne ; Susan, 
who married A. H. Purrington ; James; 
Charlotte, who married John Maxwell ; David, 
the subject of this sketch; Nathaniel S. , now 
living in Portland, Me. ; Charles, who died 
in early manhood ; Cyrene, who married J. G. 
Skillings; Mary F., who married Isaac Libby; 
Henry S. , a resident and for many years a 
prominent business man of Boston ; Lucy A., 
who resides with her brother David ; Amanda, 
who married Hugh Smith ; and two others who 
died in infancy. Of this large family only 
David, Nathaniel S. , Henry S. , and Lucy A. 
are now living. 

David Lawrence acquired his education in 
the common schools of his native town. When 
twenty-one years of age, he learned the trade 
of a brickmaker in the village of Yarmouth ; 
and he followed that occupation in Portland 
and in Lewiston, Me., for several years. 
After his marriage he moved to the homestead 
in Gray, where he engaged in farming until 
1862; and in September of that year he en- 
listed as a corporal in Company C, Twenty- 
fifth Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry, under 
Colonel Fessenden, for service in the Civil 
War. His regiment did not take part in any 
engagement, but was detailed to guard the 
Long Bridge at Washington, and afterward to 
do picket duty at Chantilly, near Centreville, 
Va. Corporal Lawrence was promoted to the 
rank of Sergeant ; and he received his discharge 
in Portland, July 10, 1863, after which he re- 
turned to Gray, and resumed farming. He has 
improved his property to a considerable extent, 
lining at the present time one of the best 
firms in town. He makes a specialty of cul- 
tivating grain and hay, but has devoted some 
attention to stock-raising. He has applied 
himself diligently to his occupation, and his 
prosperity is due to energy and perseverance 
and good management. He is a Republican 
in politics, but takes no active part in public 
affairs beyond casting his vote. He is a com- 



rade of George F. Shepley Post, No. 78, 
Grand Army of the Republic, of Gray. 

In 1848 Mr. Lawrence was married to 
Amanda M. Whitney, who was born in the 
town of Cumberland, November 2, 1824. Her 
father, Perez Whitney, who was a shoemaker 
by trade, formerly resided in the eastern part 
of Maine, but moved to Cumberland, where he- 
passed the rest of his life. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence have had eleven children, as fnl- 
lows : Charles H., who married Elizabeth 
Knight, of Gray, and now resides in Cumber- 
land, Me. ; Helen M., who lives at the 
parental home; Cora Etta, who married Fred 
Adams, and resides at Cumberland Centre; 
Walter Scott, who has passed from earth ; 
Harry L. , who married Ada Mountfort, of 
Cumberland, and resides in West Gray, where 
he carries on the business of a stone-cutter 
and marble-worker; Alice M., also departed; 
Herman H., who assists his father on the 
farm ; and four others who died in infancy. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence are members of the 
Universalist parish at Gray Corner. 




APTAIN BENJAMIN J. WILLARD 
is an old and esteemed resident of 
Portland, who has followed the sea 
for many years, and now is in busi 
ness as pilot and stevedore at 117 Commercial 
Street. He was born at Salmon's Cove, Cape 
Elizabeth, October 30, 1828, son of Samuel 
and Elizabeth (Graffam) Willard. 

The Willard family, it is said, settled in 
Sussex, England, in the time of Edward IIP, 
having come from Caen, Normandy, where 
the name was called Villard. A younger 
branch settled later in the south-easterly part 
of Kent, within a few miles of the borders of 
Sussex, and held an estate in the hundred of 
Branchley and Horsmonden. There lived and 
died the direct ancestor of Captain Willard, 
Richard Willard, whose son, Major Simon 
Willard, was the pioneer of the family in this 
country. Richard Willard died in February, 
1616; and his third wife died in the same 
month on the twenty-fifth day. Richard Wil- 
lard was the father of ten children, seven of 
•whom survived him. His son Simon was born 
in Horsmonden in 1605. 




BENJAMIN J. WILLARD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'33 



" The Willard Memoir," by Joseph Willard, 
Esq., contains an interesting description of 
the village, given by a descendant of Simon in 
the seventh generation, who visited the place 
in 1850. The church, which is two miles dis- 
tant from the village, and quite on one side 
ot the parish, is a neat Gothic edifice of stone. 
Its age is not known, but the style of the 
architecture is that of five hundred years ago ; 
and just at the entrance, in the floor of the 
principal aisle, is a tablet to the dead, bearing 
the date 1587. In this church Simon Willard 
was baptized ; and his American descendant 
read with much interest in the parchment 
register, in Old English characters, the record 
of the baptism, which runs thus: "a.d. 1605. 
The vijth day of April, Simon Willard, sonne 
of Richard Willard, was christened. Edward 
Alchine, Rector." Near the church is a 
magnificent oak, of which the townspeople are 
justly proud. The trunk is thirty feet in cir- 
cumference at the base, and fully twenty feet 
near the branches. This tree is known to be 
fully three hundred years old, and is, un- 
doubtedly, many years older. 

From this quiet village, mantled with the 
mellowing mists of bygone centuries, Simon 
Willard, with his wife and family, started out 
in the first part of the seventeenth century for 
the almost unpeopled shores of the New World. 
He landed in Boston in 1634, and soon estab- 
lished a home in Cambridge, later locating in 
Concord, of which town he was one of the 
founders. lie was a man of ample means, and 
lived in some style, making use of the family 
coat-of-arms, a copy of which is to be found in 
the American Heraldic Historical Rooms; and 
he was thirty-five years a member of the 
General Court of the colony. Major Simon 
Willard died in Charlestown, April 24, 1676, 
in the seventy-second year of his age. 

Samuel Willard, the father of Captain Ben- 
jamin J., followed the sea for a livelihood. 
He was for many years a fisherman, and died 
at his post in his seventieth year, rupturing 
a blood-vessel in his head while killing a hali- 
but. He was the father of eleven children; 
namely, Samuel, William, Enoch, Benjamin 
J., Charles, Henry, James, Mary, Elizabeth, 
Charity, and Susan. Mary is yet living, in 
her eighty-third year. 



Benjamin J. Willard received his education 
in the public schools of his native place. 
When a boy, he began to take part in the 
fishing business carried on by his father, and, 
when he reached his majority, went to sea with 
his brother, with whom he was associated two 
years. He then became master of the schooner 
"Jerome" plying between Portland and Phila- 
delphia, and in 1853 settled in Portland as pilot 
and stevedore. Captain Willard has a good 
memory, and relates in an inimitable manner 
many interesting incidents which have come 
under his personal observation. He tells how, 
in 1826 or 1827, the first hard coal was 
brought from Philadelphia to Portland by 
Captain John Wait, stored in a hogshead 
lashed on the quarter-deck of his vessel. He 
brought also an open-grate stove in which to 
burn it; and, when he was ready to start the 
fire, the neighbors from far and near gathered 
to see the "rocks" burn. The next year he 
brought several stoves for his neighbors and 
sixty tons of coal. In 1S53, when Captain 
Willard began to discharge coal at the Port 
land wharves, only eleven thousand tons came 
to the city; ami in 1894 nearly seven hundred 
thousand tons were discharged at the wharves. 
As a pilot, Captain Willard has taken personal 
part in events of historic moment. He guided 
the ship "Hero" in i860, when she came to 
Portland for the Prince of Wales and suite; 
and he piloted the steamship "Monarch " into 
Portland Harbor in 1870, when that vessel 
brought the remains of George Peabody, the 
great benefactor of American education. 
Space failing here to relate all that might be 
written of Captain Willard, the reader is re- 
ferred to an interesting autobiographical work 
which the Captain himself has recently com- 
pleted, entitled "The Life History and Ad- 
ventures of Captain B. J. Willard." 

Captain Willard has been twice married. 
His first wife was Lois Goold, his second 
Henrietta Gardiner, both now deceased. He 
has no children by either union. 

In politics Captain Willard is a Republican. 
He has resided in Portland for forty-two years, 
and is well known and highly esteemed among 
the old residents and very popular with the 
younger generation. He also has a cottage 
on Peak's Island, that beautiful summer resort, 



131 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVJKW 



where he enjoys his hours of well-earned 
leisure. 




"ARLAN M. RAYMOND, a repre- 
sentative business man of Westbrook, 
Me., who is developing one of the 
best residential portions of the city, 
was born in Charlestown, Mass., February 5, 
1842, son of Samuel T. and Elizabeth (An- 
drews) Raymond. Mis paternal grandfather, 
John T. Raymond, was a native of Lyman, 
York County, Me. He was a farmer by occu- 
pation, and passed his whole life in Lyman. 
Politically, he was an old-time Democrat; and 
in religious belief he was a Congregational ist. 
He married, and reared five children, all of 
whom have passed from the scenes of earth. 

Samuel T. Raymond was born in Lyman, 
Me., and there grew to manhood. At nine- 
teen years of age he left home, and found em- 
ployment in a brickyard in Boston, but soon 
became a clerk in a grocery store in Charles- 
town, Mass., working with one employer five 
years. The next five years he was there en- 
gaged in the grocery business for himself. 
Returning then to Maine, he bought the farm 
on which his son, Harlan M., now lives. 
Three or four years after making this purchase 
Samuel T. Raymond engaged in the grocery 
business as successor to Benjamin Harris at 
Cumberland Mills, and for four or five years 
successfully managed both the store and his 
share of the farm. He then became associated 
with George and Lewis P. Warren and Joseph 
Walker in the grain trade in Saccarappa (now 
Westbrook) ; but about five years later he dis- 
posed of his interest in that business, and, 
purchasing his brother's share in the farm, he 
devoted the rest of his life to agriculture. He 
was an enterprising man, always on the alert 
for profitable investments. During the war 
he furnished large quantities of beef for the 
army, killing on an average one hundred ani- 
mals per week; and he built a number of 
houses in Cumberland Mills to rent. Politi- 
cally, he favored the Democratic party. He 
was well advanced in Masonry, belonging to 
Portland Cnmmandery, Knights Templars, 
No. 9, of Portland. He- died in 1876, at the 
age of sixty-two. His wife, formerly Eliza- 



beth Andrews, of Charlestown, Mass., died 
April 20, 1892. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel T. 
Raymond attended the Congregational church 
in Westbrook. Three children were born to 
them, two of whom are living: Harlan M., 
the subject of this sketch; and Addie M., 
wife of H. W. Gage, of Portland, Me. 

Harlan M. Raymond received his early 
education in the schools of Westbrook, and 
afterward took a two years' course at Gorham 
Academy and one year at Fryeburg, Me. He 
worked for a while on the Raymond farm, and 
managed a milk route between Westbrook and 
Portland for three years. Then, entering the 
establishment of J. Winslow Jones, of West- 
brook, he learned to make cans for putting up 
com and other garden products; and, when his 
term of apprenticeship was completed, he be- 
came a regular employee, retaining his connec- 
tion with the concern some eight years. At 
the end of that time he entered the employ oi 
the Portland Packing Company of Westbrook, 
with whom also he remained eight years. After 
the death of his father he took charge of the 
home farm ; and in the fall of that year he 
again renewed his connection with the Porl 
land Packing Company, acting as superintend- 
ent for four years, and at the same time raising 
epiantities of hay and sweet corn on his farm. 
A Democrat like his father, Mr. Raymond 
was esteemed by members of both parties; 
and in September, 1884, he was appointed Post 
master at Cumberland Mills. Closing up his 
other business, he gave his whole attention to 
the duties of his office till April, 1889, when 
he returned to his farm. His property origi- 
nally comprised one hundred acres; but he has 
cut it up into house lots, some of which he has 
sold, and has made several new streets, includ- 
ing State, Raymond, and Pearl Streets and 
Warren Avenue. He has reserved about fort)' 
acres of intervale and twenty acres of pasture 
land. 

In April, 1865, Mr. Raymond was united 
in marriage with Hattie Swan, daughter of 
Philip and Abbie Swan, of Brownfield, Me. 
Mrs. Raymond's paternal grandfather, Will- 
iam Swan, who was a native of Bethel, Me., 
was a Drum-major in the Revolutionary army. 
Eight children have brightened the wedded life 
of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond, seven of whom are 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIF.VV 



'35 



living: King, who is in the drug business at 
Westbrook; S. J., in the Warren Mills in this 
city; ami William W. , Frank E., Herbert, 
Richard G., and Minnie, all yet with their 
parents, the three last named attending school. 
Mr. Raymond belongs to a number of fra- 
ternal organizations, including Temple Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., No. 86; Eagle Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons, of Westbrook; St. Albans 
Commandery, Knights Templars, No. 8, of 
Portland, Me. ; Pequacket Tribe, No. 16, of 
Red Men, of Westbrook; and Westbrook Com- 
mandery, No. 289, of the Order of the Golden 
Cross. With his wife and family he attends 
the Universalist church. 



«*•»» 




lARESHA S. SPEAR, a prominent 
business man of Stand ish, Me., 



was born in this town September 
10, 1856. He is a son of Eli A. 
Spear, who after many years of industrial 
activity is now living in retirement. 

Mr. Spear's grandfather, William Spear, fol- 
lowed his trade of a cabinet-maker in Standish 
a large part of his life, and in addition owned 
a farm, which he managed successfully. He 
worked hard at his trade, having little machin- 
ery to help him. Among other things then 
made by hand were coffins, which were made 
to order after the death of a person. William 
Spear made the first hearse used in this vicin- 
ity, building it on a dead axle. He married 
Rebecca Ayer ; and of their six children five 
are now living, namely: Eli A. ; Louisa, wife 
of Isaac T. Boothby, of this town, who has 
three children — Cyrus, Sarah L. , and Frank 
M. ; Elizabeth, now Mrs. Gardner, who first 
married William Lee, by whom she had two 
children — George and Frederick; Frank, 
whose wife, Sarah Fabyan, of Portland, died, 
leaving five children — George, William, Mary 
Ellen, Lizzie, and Benjamin; and Marilla, 
now Mrs. William Dyer, whose first husband, 
A. Files, died, leaving her four children, 
two of whom are living — Hattie and Lizzie. 

Eli A. Spear engaged in agricultural labors 
during his earlier years in Standish, but sub- 
sequently went into the grocery business at 
North Buxton, continuing about seven years. 
On moving back to his farm in this town, he 



established himself in the undertaking busi- 
ness, which he carried on successfully until 
1879, when he sold out to his son Maresha, 
with whom he now makes his home. In poli- 
tics he has ever supported the Republican 
ticket. To him and his wife, Mary Ann 
Hamlin, daughter of Jacob Hamlin, of Buxton, 
nine children were born, eight of whom are 
living, named as follows: Etta, Augustus, 
Anna, Ella, James F. , Willard W. , Maresha 
S. , and Lizzie. Etta Spear, the eldest, has 
been three times married, and is now a widow. 
By her first husband, Darius Flood, she had 
two children, Annie and Emma; and by her 
third, John Mayo, she has three children — 
Sadie, Preston, and George. Augustus A. 
married Sarah Hodgdon, of Ossipee, N. II.; 
and they have one child, Lena. Anna, wife 
of Andrew Palmer, of Buxton, has two chil 
dren — George and Clara. Ella, wife of 
Alvin E. Fuller, of Steep Falls, has four 
children — Charles W. , William, Jennie, ami 
Edwinna. James F. married Marion Bond, of 
Standish, and has four children — Fred B. , 
Charles I., Roy, and Risper. Willard W. 
married Laura Allen, of Westbrook; and they 
have four children — Ola, Carroll, Hattie, and 
Vernie. Lizzie, wife of B. M. Jenness, of 
Springvale, Me., has one child, Delbert Jen- 
ness. The mother, who died in 1873, was an 
active member of the Methodist church, to 
which her husband belongs. 

Maresha S. Spear was brought up and edu- 
cated in Standish ; and, after leaving school, 
he began working for his father. Intelligent, 
diligent, and ambitious, in a few years he be- 
came competent to take entire charge of both 
the farm and the undertaking business, which 
he bought of his father in 1S79, and has since 
conducted. With characteristic enterprise, in 
1886 he built his present store, and besides 
his former business took up carriage painting. 
Succeeding well in his new venture, Mr. Spear 
the next year added furniture to his stock in 
trade, and has since put in an assortment of 
crockery, carpets, wall paper, and other goods 
kept in a general house-furnishing store, his 
establishment being well patronized. Mr. 
Spear is a member of the Methodist church of 
North Buxton, and politically is a stanch 
Republican. He is a member of Saco Valley 



■36 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



I odge, No. 43, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of West Buxton. 

On February 19, 18S1, Mr. Spear was 
united in marriage with Lydia O. Hamlin, 
daughter of Cotton Hamlin, of this place. 
They have two children: Arthur G., born 
.March 23, 1883; and Walter M., born May 
23, 1 886. 



/fTo 



EORGE SMITH ROWELL, A.M., 
\ '*> I editor and manager of the Portland 
Daily Advertiser, through which he 
has become widely known as a man of superior 
ability and worth, was born in the town of 
Hallowcll, Me., on March 12, 1846, son of 
Eliphalet and Ellen (Smith) Rowell. 

Members of the Rowell family appear to 
have been among the early settlers of Essex 
County, Massachusetts, the records showing 
that Thomas Rowell received a grant of land 
in Salisbury in 1639. Some of this name 
were among the pioneers of New Hampshire, 
whence later on certain of the descendants re- 
moved to Maine, Abijah Rowell, the grand- 
father of George Smith Rowell, being one of 
the first to settle in Livcrmore, Androscoggin 
County, where he became a successful agri- 
culturist. He married Miss Sophia Warren, 
a lineal descendant of the family of which 
General Joseph Warren, of Bunker Hill fame, 
was a distinguished representative. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Abijah Rowell lived to an advanced 
age, his death occurring in his ninetieth year, 
and that of his wife when she was ninety-seven 
years old. 

Their son, Eliphalet Rowell, was born at 
Livermore in May, 1822. He learned the 
trade of a printer at Brunswick, Me., and then 
went to Hallowcll, where he began the pub- 
lication of the Hallowcll Gazette, an old es- 
tablished weekly, prior to the Fremont cam- 
paign an advocate of Whig principles, and 
later one of the leading Republican papers of 
Kennebec County. He continued to publish 
the Gazette for a quarter of a century, a por- 
tion of which time it was under the manage- 
ment of his son; for at the opening of the 
Civil War he was appointed by President 
Lincoln as Paymaster in the army, and served 
in that capacity until the close of the Rebell- 



ion. After his return to Hallowell, Eliphalet 
Rowell received an appointment as Postmaster 
under President Johnson, and by reappoint- 
ments remained in that position for twelve 
years. For several years he has been Manager 
and Treasurer of the Maine Industrial School 
for Girls at Hallowell, Me. He is President 
of the Hallowell Savings Bank, Judge of the 
Municipal Courts at that place, and has also 
served a number of terms in the State legisla- 
ture. Fraternally, he is a member of John 
Hubbard Post, Grand Army of the Republic, 
of Hallowell, in which he holds the office of 
Post Commander; and Rowell Camp, Sons of 
Veterans, was named in his honor. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Ellen Smith, was a 
daughter of Samuel Smith, a sea captain. 
Eight children were the fruit of their union, 
although but two now survive, namely: George 
Smith Rowell, the eldest child; and William 
W. Rowell, who is now living in Minneapolis, 
Minn., but was formerly business manager of 
the Auburn Gazette. Both parents are active 
and influential members of the Baptist church. 
George Smith Rowell acquired his early ed- 
ucation in the common schools of Hallowell, 
completing his course of study in the high 
school. As a boy, he learned the trade of a 
printer, after which he became an associate 
editor of the Hallowell Gazette, conducting the 
paper during his father's absence in the war 
until his own enlistment in the Twenty-ninth 
Maine Regiment. In 1S65 he entered Colby 
University in the class of 1869, and took the 
first two years of the course, after which he 
accepted a position as associate editor of the 
Aroostook Pioneer at Presque Isle, Me., con- 
tinuing with that paper a little over a year. 
The Aroostook Pioneer then removed its office 
to Houlton, Me.; and he purchased an interest 
in its rival, the Presque Isle Sunrise. This 
paper, during his connection with it, was, so 
far as is known to him, the first to put forth 
the name of General Ulysses S. Grant for the 
Presidency. In 1868 Mr. Rowell came to 
Portland, where until 1873 he filled the posi- 
tion first of foreman, and later of business 
manager of the A dvertiser. He then returned 
to Presque Isle, and for two years was engaged 
in the apothecary business, when he again en- 
tered the office of the Portland Daily Adver- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



•37 



User as business manager, and held that posi- 
tion continuously until the death of H. W. 
Richardson in 1889, since which time he has 
been the managing editor, the paper being 
owned by an incorporated company, The State 
Publishing Association, he holding the eon- 
trolling stock. It is the leading daily even- 
ing paper of Portland. 

On April 17, 1871, Mr. Rowell was joined 
in marriage with Miss Lydia E. Gallagher, a 
daughter of Michael Gallagher, of Presque 
Isle. Among the numerous fraternal organi- 
zations, both at Presque Isle and Portland, of 
which Mr. Rowell is a member, are the fol- 
lowing: Grand Army of the Republic; Trinity 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., Presque Isle, of 
which he is Past Master; and Mount Vernon 
Chapter, in which he holds the office of 
Scribe; the Portland Commandery ; Yates 
Lodge of Perfection; Portland Council, 
Princes of Jerusalem; Dunlap Chapter of 
Rose Croix; and Maine Consistory, he having 
taken the thirty-second degree in the Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite. He is also con- 
nected with the Portland Athletic Club, was 
the first President of Portland Press Club, and 
is now serving his second term as President of 
the Maine Press Association, before which he 
has been called upon to deliver addresses ; and 
he is also a member of the Fraternity Club 
and the leading literary club of the city. In 
1872 Colby University, Waterville, Me., con- 
ferred upon him, out of course, the honorary 
degree of A.M. 




ILLARD WOODBURY WOOD- 
MAN, Principal of the high school 
in Gorham, Cumberland County, 
Me., was born in Hebron, in the adjoining 
county of Oxford, January 18, 1865, son of 
Mellen and Edith O. (Bearce) Woodman. 
Mr. Woodman is a direct descendant, in the 
ninth generation, of Edward Woodman, who 
emigrated from England to America on board 
the ship "James" in April, 1635, and settling 
at Newbury, Mass., was for a long series of 
years one of the leading men of the town. 
From him the line of descent continues di- 
rectly from father to son, as follows: Edward, 
son of Edward, the original ancestor in Amer- 



ica, to Archelaus, and from him through 
Joshua, John, and John, second, to Isaiah 
Woodman, Mr. Willard W. Woodman's grand- 
father. 

Isaiah Woodman was born in Minot, An- 
droscoggin County, Me., and followed farm- 
ing with good results in that town for many 
years. He was a man who possessed intellect- 
ual and moral qualifications which fitted him 
to take a prominent part in public affairs. 
He was a member of the Board of Selectmen 
of Minot for several years, also serving one 
term in the legislature as a representative 
from that town. He later moved to Auburn, 
Me., where his ability was once more called 
into public use; and he was again elected a 
representative to the legislature. He reared 
a family of five children, of whom Mellen was 
the third. 

Mellen Woodman was born in Minot, and 
in his boyhood attended the common schools 
of that town. He engaged in agriculture at 
an early age, and made his home in Minot for 
some time after his marriage, but is now re- 
siding in Auburn. He is an energetic, indus- 
trious, and thoroughly practical farmer, fully 
alive to all modern improvements and progres- 
sive ideas, and successful in the application of 
his knowledge to his every-day work. I le was 
once elected a Selectman in the town of 
Minot, but is not fond of office-holding, and 
has repeatedly refused public positions offered 
him. He has ever been highly esteemed for 
h is straightforward course in life and his 
many excellent traits of character. In his 
religious views he is a Universalist. He 
married Edith O. Bearce, daughter of Asa 
Bearce, of Minot; and they reared a family of 
six children, as follows: Willard Woodbury, 
Laura ()., Fred B., Arthur M., Grace M., and 
John. 

Willard Woodbury Woodman commenced 
his education in the common schools of Minot, 
later pursuing a course of stud)- at Hebron 
Academy, and then entering the Auburn High 
School, from which he was graduated in 1883. 
Possessing in a marked degree a taste and 
faculty for learning, he was ambitious to ac- 
quire a knowledge of the higher branches, with 
the view of becoming a teacher of advanced 
classes. He accordingly taught school in 



■ 38 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Minot fur line year; and then, in order to 
thoroughly perfect himself for the work, in the 
autumn of 1884 he entered Bowdoin College, 
from which he was graduated with the degree 
of A.B. in 1888, three years later being 
honored by his Alma Mater with the degree 
of A.M. It is worthy of note that Mr. Wood- 
man took an important part in the Commence- 
ment exercises at the close of his Senior year, 
his attainments during his four years' course 
entitling him to this honor. 

After his graduation he accepted a position 
as instructor in Latin at Thayer Academy in 
South Braintree, Mass., where he remained for 
one year; and in the fall of 1889 he became 
Principal of the Gorham High School. Well 
fitted for his work, both by natural ability 
and scholarly acquirements, by the power of 
persistent endeavor he has met with signal 
success in his calling. His advanced methods 
of instruction are of a kind that foster the 
mental activity of his pupils, who, being led 
to think for themselves, thoroughly understand 
what they learn, and are strengthened in the 
habit of self-reliance. Mr. Woodman is a 
member of the Alpha Delta Phi and the Phi 
Beta Kappa Societies, and was during his col- 
legiate course one of the editors of the Bugle, 
a class publication, and also one of the edi- 
l uvs of the Bowdoin Orient, the organ of that 
college. 

Mr. Woodman was united in marriage with 
Alice L. Paine, daughter of Phineas I. Paine, 
of Gorham, on June 30, 1891, and by this 
union has two sons — Willard Paine Woodman 
and Karl Ayer Woodman. Mr. Woodman is 
of the liberal type in religion, and belongs to 
the Unitarian church. 




^Y? jELVILLE W. CRESSEY, an 

energetic and enterprising agri- 
culturist of Gorham, Me., was 
born in this town, February 2, 
1867. Gorham was also the place of nativity 
of his father, William W. Cressey, of his 
grandfather, Joseph Cressey, second, and of 
his great-grandfather, Joseph Cressey, first, 
son of John Cressey, who came here from 
Connecticut. Joseph Cressey, first, was born 
in Gorham in 1753. He was a private in 



Captain Williams's company, and marched to 
Cambridge with Colonel Phinney's regiment 
in 1775, and subsequently to Ticonderoga. 
He married Hannah Ashley, of Connecticut, 
by whom he had seven children, five sons and 
two daughters. He is spoken of as a great 
man for stock in those early days, and it is 
said that at the time of his death he had over 
one hundred cows rented out in the adjoining 
towns. 

Joseph Cressey, second, son of Joseph, first, 
was born March 14, 1788. He was twice 
married, and by his first wife, Sarah Watts, 
whom he wedded in January 21, 1817, had six 
children, namely: Charles H., born November 
2r, 1817; Joseph, third, October 30, 1820; 
Emily, December 23, 1824; William W., 
born October 1, 1828; Mary E., October 29, 
1835; Edward K., March 12, 1838. Only 
one of these children is now living, Joseph 
Cressey, third, of Newfield, Me. By his 
second wife, Sarah J. Harding, of Baldwin, 
this State, grandfather Cressey had two chil- 
dren — John H. and Sarah Ellen. He was an 
extensive landholder, having a farm of two 
hundred and fifty acres, from which he cleared 
a good homestead. He kept a sort of tavern, 
putting up a great many ox-teams and their 
drivers in the days when the freight was car- 
ried over the common roads. He was a Re- 
publican in politics; and, religiously, he and 
his family were Congregational ists. He was 
among the men of prominence in this locality, 
and for many years served as Town Collector. 

William W. Cressey spent his entire life in 
Gorham, where he was numbered among the 
progressive and prosperous agriculturists, 
being one of the first to engage in breeding 
Jersey cattle. He was a member of Harmony 
Lodge, No. 39, A. E. & A. M., of Gorham; 
and of the Patrons of Husbandry of this place. 
He died May 2, 1892. He was married on 
January 26, 1854, to Miss Ellen F., daughter 
of Robert Rounds, of Gorham; and three chil- 
dren were born in their pleasant home, two of 
whom are now living — Charles R. and Mel- 
ville W. 

Charles R. Cressey, born December 7, 1S54, 
received his early education in the schools of 
Gorham. When quite young, he displayed a 
taste for music; and, to cultivate his powers in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



! 39 



this direction, he was placed under the instruc- 
tion of Mr. George Marston, of Portland, Me. 
While pursuing his studies, he was organist 
at the Congregational church in Gorham for 
about eight years. After completing his 
musical course, he occupied a similar position 
in the Free Street Church in Portland: and 
he is now organist in the Warren Church at 
W'estbrook. In 1885 he embarked in business 
for himself, opening a music store in the city 
of Portland. This he conducted for a time 
alone; but, the trade having rapidly increased, 
he has since taken two partners, the firm name 
being Cressey, Jones & Allen. Mr. Charles 
R. Cressey married Annie C. Johnson, daugh- 
ter of Thomas Johnson, of Gorham; and they 
are the parents of three children — Helen H., 
William R., and George F. Both he and his 
wife are members of the Second Parish Con- 
gregational Church of Portland. Socially, he 
is identified with various organizations, being 
a member of Dirigo Lodge, No. 21, Knights 
of Pythias, of Gorham; Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows of Portland; also the Red Men; 
and the Knights of the Golden Eagle of Port- 
land. 

Melville W. Cressey obtained a good com- 
mon-school education, and, when but a lad, be- 
came familiar with farm work. Fallowing in 
the footsteps of his progenitors, he became a 
farmer by choice rather than necessity, and 
has since continued in his peaceful and profit- 
able occupation on the old homestead. Al- 
though a general farmer, Mr. Cressey pays es- 
pecial attention to dairying, having about 
thirty grade and full-blood Jerseys, from 
which he makes huge quantities of excellent 
butter. This he disposes of in Portland, hav- 
ing regular customers who pay him the high- 
est market price. 

Mr. Melville W. Cressey and Miss Sarah J. 
Fifield, daughter of James J. Fifield, of this 
town, were married on December 8, 1890. 
The only child of their union, Dwight Sturgis 
Cressey, was born PVbruary 25, 1891, and 
died August 30, 1893. Mr. Cressey, po- 
litically, is. identified with the Republican 
party. Religiously, he attends the Congrega- 
tional church, of which his wife is a member. 
Socially, he belongs to Harmony Lodge, No. 
39, A. F. & A. M., of Gorham; to the Gor- 



ham Lodge, No. 98, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows; and to the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry of this place. 




HARLES S. CHASE, wholesale dealer 
in lime, cement, and belting material, 
5 Canal Wharf, Portland, was born 
in Portland, November 6, 1845. 
His parents were Sevvall C. and Mary (Trow- 
bridge) Chase; and his paternal grandfather 
was Timothy Chase, who was a mason by 
trade. 

Sewall C. Chase was a contractor and 
builder. He erected in 1851 the first brick 
building on Commercial Street; and it was he 
who built the Preble House, the City Build- 
ing, and the Grand Trunk depot. For many 
years he was associated with his brother Ed- 
ward P., who is yet living, now retired from 
active work; and together they built most of 
the brick buildings in Portland, including the 
Thomas Block, the Gait Block, the rolling- 
mill, the Portland Kerosene Oil Works, the 
Glass House, and the shovel factory. Sewall 
C. Chase took an active part in public affairs, 
serving several terms on the Common Council 
of Portland and on the Board of Aldermen, 
and was elected to the State legislature from 
Portland on the Republican ticket. He died 
in 1875. His wife was the daughter of Major 
Trowbridge, a gallant soldier of the War of 
1S12. She died in 1887. Five children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Sewall C. Chase, 
namely: William Porter, who died in Ha- 
vanna, Cuba, in 1867, leaving a widow and 
one child; Francis E. ; Lois A., who mar- 
ried Charles B. Bailey, and resides in Wash- 
ington, D.C.; Etta M., who married E. C. 
Goodhue, and lives in Danville, Canada; and 
Charles S., our subject. 

Charles S. Chase attended the public schools 
and the high school of Portland, and was one 
of the first six scholars who attended Bryant & 
Stratton's Commercial College of Portland. 
After leaving school, he worked in his father's 
office four years, and in 1870 became estab- 
lished in business in the building which he 
now occupies, as a member of the new firm of 
C. A. B. Morse & Co., succeeding the firm of 
Beale & Morse. In 1884 Mr. Chase pur- 



140 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



chased Mr. Morse's interest, and since that 
time has been sole proprietor of the enter- 
prise. He has an extensive trade in Maine, 
New Hampshire, and Vermont, and has pros- 
pered to a remarkable degree, his promptness 
in meeting the demands of customers, and his 
ability in the management of his business, 
insuring quick and profitable returns for his 
investments. 

Mr. Chase married Louise K. Sawyier, 
daughter of Moses K. and Caroline (Kimball) 
Sawyier, and cousin of the late Charles Carle- 
ton Coffin, the famous war correspondent of 
the Boston Journal during the Southern Re- 
bellion. Mr. and Mrs. Chase have one child, 
Alice Sawyier Chase. In politics Mr. Chase 
is a Republican. He is not an aspirant for 
office. In religious belief he is a Congrega- 
tionalist, attending with his wife and family 
the church on High Street. He has a con- 
venient residence and pleasant home at i i 
Carleton Street. 




,HARLES EDWARD GOOLD, a 
prosperous market gardener of Deer- 
ing, was born in Westbrook, Me., 
August 26, 1842, son of Smith Cobb 
and Catherine (Starbird) Goold. He comes 
of an old Maine family, his grandfather, 
Joseph Goold, being a native of Kittery. His 
father, Smith Cobb Goold, was born in Port- 
land, Me., December 14, 1818, and received 
his education in the common schools of that 
city. lie learned the shoemaker's trade with 
J. & C. J. Barber, of Portland, and, after 
working at it for a few years, settled on the 
farm which had belonged to his father, which 
fronted on what is now Brighton Street, Deer- 
ing, and included the estate owned by his 
son, Charles Edward Goold. There he spent 
the rest of his life, profitably engaged in farm- 
ing. On November 30, 1841, he was married 
to Catherine, daughter of Levi and Nancy 
( Pennel ) Starbird, of Westbrook, and three 
children were born to them: Charles Edward, 
the subject of this sketch; Annie Louisa, wife 
of Edward K. Chapman, of South Portland, 
Me.; ami Henry Pennel Starbird Goold, who 
is in the drug business in Portland. Both 
attended the Universal ist church. Smith 



Cobb Goold died July 31, 1894, aged seventy- 
five years. His wife is still living. 

Charles Edward Goold received a good edu- 
cation in the common schools of his native 
town and at Westbrook Seminary. Succeed- 
ing his father as manager of the homestead 
farm, he engaged in market gardening; and, 
being a man of more than average intelli- 
gence, with the faculty of turning everything 
to the best account, he has been very success- 
ful. He employs several men, and raises 
large quantities of produce, which find ready 
sale in the Portland markets. 

Mr. Goold was married in 1882 to Ada 
Louisa, daughter of James S. and Comfort 
Whitehouse (Jackson) Knowles, of Deering. 
Mrs. Goold died April 10, 1S91, leaving one 
daughter, Henrietta Knowles. 

Mr. Goold was elected Alderman from 
Ward 7, on the Republican ticket in 1894, 
and served capably on the Committees on 
Streets, Sidewalks and Bridges, Lights and 
Water, Printing, and New Streets. He takes 
an active interest in public affairs, and the 
soundness of his views on all matters of 
public policy'has won for him general respect. 
With his daughter he attends the Universal ist 
church, of which his wife was also an at- 
tendant. 




ON. HENRY B. CLEAVES, the 
present Governor of Maine, was born 
in Bridgton, Me. His father, 
Thomas Cleaves, also a native of 
Bridgton, was a man of great energy and dis- 
tinguished for the strictest integrity. Mis 
mother, Sophia Bradstreet Cleaves, a woman 
of high worth, was the daughter of Daniel 
Bradstreet, who came from Rowley, Mass., 
and settled in Bridgton in the early days. 
The family circle included five children — 
Robert A., Nathan, Thomas P., Henry B., 
and Mary S. Cleaves. The last-named is now 
the wife of William W. Mason. Judge 
Nathan Cleaves, the senior member of the 
law firm of Nathan and Henry B. Cleaves, 
died September 5, 1892. A resident of Port- 
land for more than thirty years, he was closely 
identified with the best interests of this city. 
He was graduated from Bowdoin College in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mi 



1858, attained eminence in his profession as 
a lawyer, occupied many positions of honor 
and public trust, was held in the highest es- 
teem, and the sense of the loss caused by his 
death was generally felt throughout the State. 
Governor Cleaves was educated in the com- 
mon schools of his native town and at the 
academies of Bridgton and Lewiston Falls. 
In the summer of 1862 he enlisted as a private 
soldier in Company B, Twenty-third Maine 
Volunteers, under Colonel William Wirt 
Virgin, late a Justice of the Supreme Court 
of the State of Maine. Having served out the 
term of his enlistment at Poolsville on the 
Potomac and at Harper's Perry, during which 
period he was promoted to the rank of Orderly 
Sergeant, he was discharged when the regi- 
ment was mustered out. However, influenced 
by his patriotism, he immediately re-enlisted 
for three years under General Francis Fessen- 
den, a son of the Hon. William Pitt Fessen- 
ilen, who was recruiting a veteran regiment 
for active service in the Department of the 
Gulf. Young Cleaves was appointed First 
Lieutenant of Company F. On one occasion 
in the course of the service, when the officers of 
Company E had been either killed or disabled 
in action, he acted as Captain. A portion of 
his time was served in the Department of the 
Gulf, where he participated in various engage- 
ments under General Banks on the Red River 
expedition, at Mansfield, Pleasant Hill, Cane 
River Crossing, and other places. After the 
close of the campaign in Louisiana the regi- 
ment was ordered to Virginia; and Lieutenant 
Cleaves served during the remainder of the 
war in the Army of the Potomac; and with 
General Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. 
When the war ended, he was offered a commis- 
sion in the regular army by Secretary of War 
Stanton. Declining this, he returned to his 
home in Bridgton, and was employed as a day 
laborer in Perley & Styles's sash and blind 
factory. While here, he studied law with such 
assiduity that in September, 1868, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar. After this he moved to 
Portland, and formed a law partnership with 
his brother, the late Judge Nathan Cleaves. 
The firm had a large and lucrative practice, 
and was extensively known throughout the 
State and New England. Governor Cleaves 



is a director in many of the business corpora- 
tions of the State. He is a prominent mem 
ber of the Grand Army and the Marine State 
Veteran Association. In the practice of his 
profession and in matters of charity he has 
always shown a great friendship for the old 
soldier. His successful defence of William 
T. Best, a disabled veteran, in the extradition 
proceedings brought against him by the Prov- 
ince of New Brunswick, will be readily re- 
called, as it excited great interest at the time. 

Governor Cleaves, who has always been 
a Republican, cast his first vote in a national 
election for Abraham Lincoln, while still in 
active service in Virginia in the fall of 1864. 
He was a member of the legislature from Port- 
land in 1876 and 1877, and served as Chair- 
man of the Judiciary Committee. He was 
elected City Solicitor of Portland in 1877, and 
during his two years of office tried many impor- 
tant cases for the city. He was elected Attor- 
ney-General of Maine in 1880, and was twice 
re-elected to this important office by the legis- 
lature, serving five consecutive years. In this 
period, besides trying some eighteen murder 
cases, he prosecuted the important State tax 
cases against the railroad and telegraph com- 
panies to a successful termination, settling 
conclusively the right of the State to levy a 
franchise tax upon these corporations. Nomi- 
nated for Governor at the Republican State 
Convention held in Portland in June, 1S92, he- 
was elected in September of the same year, 
and inaugurated on January 5, 1893. His 
nomination on this occasion without a dissent- 
ing voice was unusual in the politics of Maine, 
and evidenced his great popularity with the 
people. TI is renomination by acclamation at 
the large and enthusiastic convention held at 
Lewiston, June 5, 1S94, was a deserved recog- 
nition of the man and the citizen, of the faith- 
ful and honest public officer, and of his able 
administration of the affairs of the State during 
his first term. At the September election in 
1894 he was re-elected by nearly forty thou- 
sand majority, the largest majority ever given 
a Republican governor in Maine. 

His inaugural addresses, which are models 
of construction, and are such as only a scholar 
and statesman can write, have elicited com- 
mendation wherever noticed by the press. In 



14^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the performance of his official duties he has 
invariably guarded the interests of the State 
with sedulous care. One of the leading papers 
oi Maine recently said: "To-day, throughout 
the length and breadth of the good old State 
of Maine, the name of Governor Cleaves is not 
only known, but is also held in the highest 
esteem. Political opponents even vie with 
each other in paying tribute to his administra- 
tive qualities, as well as to the goodness of his 
great, big heart. " 




LMON H. CRESSEY, a thriving agri- 
culturist of Standish, was born in Gor- 
ham, a few miles distant, on Septem- 
ber 9, 1834, and is the worthy repre- 
sentative of one of the original settlers of 
Cumberland County, his great-grandfather, 
John Cressey, having located here in early 
times. 

Joseph Cressey, son of John, was born, 
reared, and spent his entire life in Gorham, 
where he was prosperously engaged in cultivat- 
ing the land, owning a large farm. His wife, 
Hannah Ashley, of Connecticut, lived to the 
venerable age of fourscore and eight years. 
Noah Cressey, father of Almon, was the 
youngest child. 

Noah Cressey was born in Gorham, July 28, 
1798, and died in Standish, April 20, 1839. 
In early life he was engaged in a mercantile 
business in the place of his nativity, but after- 
ward removed to Standish, where he continued 
his former occupation for a short time. He 
subsequently bought a farm here, and was 
engaged in mixed husbandry until his death, 
lie was a Democrat in politics, differing in 
his views from his father, who was a Whig. 
Religiously, both he and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Methodist church. He married 
Hannah Watts, daughter of David and Mary 
Watts, of Buxton, their union being solem- 
nized January 2 1, 1817. Six children were 
born to them, two of whom are living — George 
E. and Almon H. George E., born May 24, 
[829, married Harriet, daughter of Charles 
Smith, of Scarboro, Me. 

Almon H. Cressey finished his education at 
the Standish Academy, and as soon as he was 
out of school went to Buxton, where he was 



employed for three years as a clerk in the 
general store of J. Clay. He established him- 
self in business on his own account in 1854, 
manufacturing clothing for three years. De- 
ciding to change his occupation, Mr. Cressey 
then peddled Yankee notions throughout the 
State of Maine, driving a team and having his 
cart well stocked with articles useful to the 
thrifty housewife. Some time later he became 
agent for a lightning-rod company, and trav- 
elled about the country selling rods for three 
years. He then resumed the manufacture of 
clothing, locating at first in Standish, but 
later in Buxton. After five years of business 
in Buxton Mr. Cressey purchased his brother's 
interest in the old homestead property, which 
he has since conducted with excellent results. 
A man of great intelligence and ability, he has 
ever taken a dee)) interest in the welfare and 
advancement of his town, and for several years 
served as Selectman, being first elected to the 
office in 1877; and during the last six years of 
his service he was Chairman of the Board. In 
politics he affiliates with the Democratic party. 
He is a prominent member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, belonging to Buxton Lodge, A. E. & 
A. M., No. 115, of Buxton. 

On May 20, 1870, Mr. Cressey was united 
in marriage with Abby M. , daughter of George 
W. Boothby, of Limington. Their only child, 
Edwin B. Cressey, born July 30, 1871, mar- 
ried Nettie O. Marean, daughter of William 
Mareari, of this town ; and they have one child, 
Mildred L., born May 20, 1892. Mr. and 
Mrs. Almon H. Cressey are liberal in their 
religious views. 




ANCIS EDWARD CHASE, in- 
spector and acting Deputy Collector of 
United States customs at Portland, was 
born in this city, May 17, 1840, son of Sewall 
C. and Mary A. II. (Trowbridge) Chase. His 
family has for many years been well known in 
this vicinity, his grandfather, Timothy Chase, 
who was a mason and builder, having been 
a respected resident of Yarmouth and Portland. 
Sewall C. Chase lived in Portland for many 
years, being a prominent contracting mason 
and builder. A huge number of the brick 
buildings on Commercial and Middle Streets 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'43 



and many of the fine brick residences in Port- 
land were built by him, and he was superin- 
tendent of the City Building when that edifice 
was erected. He was lung associated in busi- 
ness with his brother, Edward P. Chase, who 
was one of the leading builders of the time. 
In politics.a Republican, Mr. Sewall C. Chase 
was elected to the State legislature from the 
city of Portland on the old Whig ticket, before 
the party had changed its name, and served 
his term with credit. In religious matters 
also he took a prominent part, and was Deacon 
in the High Street Congregational Church for 
many years. He died on January 20, 1874. 
His wife was a daughter of John Trowbridge, 
of Portland, a Revolutionary soldier. They 
reared the following children : William Porter, 
who died in Cuba; Francis Edward, the 
subject of this sketch; Lois Anna, wife of 
Charles li. Bailey, of Portland formerly, now 
of Washington; Charles S., of Portland; 
and Etta, wife of Edward Goodhue, of Dan- 
ville, P. (J. 

Francis Edward Chase acquired bis educa- 
tion in Portland, graduating from the high 
school in the class of 1858. He was engaged 
as book-keeper for his father for two years, 
and in i860 went into the wholesale grocery 
business with Joshua Hobbs and his son John 
P., under the firm name of Hobbs, Chase & 
1 '". In September, 1862, he enlisted in Com- 
pany A, Twenty-fifth Maine Volunteer In- 
fantry, and was sent to Washington, where his 
company was on duty at Long Bridge and 
quartered at Arlington Heights, some time 
later being ordered to Chantilly. In July, 
1863, at the expiration of his term of enlist- 
ment, he returned to Portland and resumed his 
mercantile business, in which he was success- 
fully engaged till 1869. In that year he was 
appointed Inspector of Customs under Collector 
Israel Washburn ; and he has efficiently filled 
the position up to the present time, with the 
exception of a short period beginning with 
1887, when he was retired, being reappointed 
by Collector F. N. Dow in 1891. During his 
retirement he was employed on special work, 
as he is one of the oldest men in the service. 
Since Mr. Chase's last appointment he has 
been Acting Deputy. Faithful to all the 
details of his duty, Mr. Chase enjoys the con- 



fidence and esteem of his fellow-officials, and 
by his unfailing courtesy and his wise judg- 
ment in matters of moment, has won gen- 
eral respect and good will. 

December 3, 1863, he was united in mar- 
riage with Augusta Bradford, daughter of Free- 
man and Maria H. (Hall) Bradford, of Porl 
land. One child was bom to them, March 4, 
1865, who died in October, 1875. 

Mr. Chase takes no active part in political 
matters. He is a thirty-second degree Mason, 
the first Lodge of which he became a member 
being Atlantic, No. 81, of which he was Master 
and is now Past Master. He was the first 
Master of Deering Lodge, No. 183, which 
was organized in 1878, and is its present Sec- 
retary; is Past High Priest of Greenleaf Chap- 
ter of Portland, of which he has been Secre- 
tary since 1876; Past Thrice Illustrious 
Master of Portland Council, Royal and Select 
Masters; Past Eminent Commander of St. 
Alban Commandery, No. 8, of which body he 
is now Prelate; a member of Yates Lodge of 
Perfection and of the Portland Council of 
Princes of Jerusalem. He has been conductor 
of ceremonies in Rose Croix Chapter, of which 
he is now Warden, and belongs to the Maine- 
Consistory. He is also a member of the 
Grand Commandery of the State of Maine, and 
was District Deputy Grand Master for the dis- 
trict of Maine for two years, and has attended 
the different conclaves. He belongs to Unity 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
Rocky Hill Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of 
Deering; is a member of the Samoset Tribe 
of Red Men, of Portland; and was Master of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen one term ; 
he is a member of the Royal Arcanum, the 
Royal Society of Good Fellows, and has been 
Financial Secretary of the Portland Assembly 
since its organization. While in Portland Mr. 
Chase attended the High Street Congregational 
Church, contributing to its support. 



LBERT GREEN, who is engaged in 
a general mercantile business at 
Bridgton, this county, was born 
March 16, 184 1, in Berlin Falls, 
Coos County, N.IL, being a son of Edmund 
and Hannah C. (Wiley) Green. The parental 




144 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



household included five children, three sons 
and two daughters, of whom four are now liv- 
ing, namely: Albert; Mary A.; Nelson A., 
who was a private in the Thirteenth Maine 
Volunteer Infantry, and died of diphtheria on 
Ship Island, his remains being interred on 
Southern soil; and Charles S., who served as 
a private in Company II, First New Hamp- 
shire Heavy Artillery, and is now residing in 
Mechanic Falls, Me. 

Albert Green was reared on the home farm, 
remaining with his parents until his enlist- 
ment, August 13, 1864, in the First New 
Hampshire Heavy Artillery, Company II, 
being mustered into service at Concord, that 
State. With his regiment he was sent to 
Washington, where he did guard duty until 
receiving an honorable discharge, June 17, 
1865. On his return home he settled in 
Stark, Coos County, N.H., whither his pa- 
rents had moved during his absence, and 
where he remained until 1866, when he went 
to Ridgway, Elk County, Pa., where he 
worked in the woods and in a mill for 
two years, having control of a lumber camp 
during the winter. Returning to Stark, he 
opened a store for the sale of general mer- 
chandise, continuing until the spring of 1872, 
when he came to Rridgton, and was engaged 
here for four years and a half in the grocery 
business. He then went to Lewiston, where 
he remained two years. The following year 
Mr. Green spent in Berlin Mills, N.H., after 
which he paid a visit to his parents in Stark, 
remaining with them a while, and assisting 
them in their store. In 1883 he came again 
to Bridgton, and, opening his present well- 
equipped store, has since carried on a flourish- 
ing trade in general merchandise, his stead- 
fast aim being to please and satisfy the 
demands of his large and increasing number 
of patrons. 

Mr. Green has been twice married, first in 
1868 to Miss Kate M. Horr, who died two 
years later; and second, in 1874, to Miss 
Flora Plummer, who is the mother of one 
child, Alice R. Socially, Mr. Green is a 
member in high standing of the Independent 
( Irder of ( kid Fellows and of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. Politically, he is a stanch 
Republican. 




ON. FRED EDGECOMB RICH- 
ARDS, President of the Union 
Mutual Life Insurance Company of 
Portland, was bom at Lincolnville, 
Waldo County, Me., August 28, 1841, son of 
Charles anil Elizabeth P. (Smith) Richards. 
The Richards family is one of the oldest in 
Xew England, having settled in Massachusetts 
in Colonial times. Thomas Richards, the 
great-grandfather of the subject of this biogra- 
phy, was a farmer in Stoughton, Mass. 

Charles Richards, son of Benjamin and 
grandson of Thomas Richards, was bom in 
Sharon, Mass., January 7, 1800, and lived in 
that town until twenty-five years of age, being 
by occupation a farmer. In 1825 he settled 
on a farm in Lincolnville, Waldo County, be- 
coming in course of time one of the influential 
citizens of that town, actively interested in all 
projects for the public good, especially for the 
advancement of education. In politics he was 
a Democrat until 1856, when he became an 
ardent supporter of John C. Fremont; and he 
was a prominent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He died January 5, 1S81. 
His wife, to whom he was united when a 
young man of twenty-three, was a daughter 
of James and Mollie (Smith) Smith, of Can- 
ton, Mass. She lived to be seventy-seven 
years of age, passing from earth in 1877. 
They were the parents of six children, five <il 
whom are still living. One son, Charles F., 
is Treasurer of the Camden Savings Bank at 
Camden, Knox Count)', Me. 

Fred E. Richards attended the common 
schools of Lincolnville and the high school at 
Rockport, Knox County, where his patents 
spent the latter part of their lives. lie first 
worked as a clerk for David Talbot, a large 
ship-owner; but in 1862, on account of severe 
lung trouble, he resigned his position and went 
to California, travelling by way of Aspinwall. 
He was in the employ of the Wells-Fargo Ex- 
press Company for three years, at the end of 
that time returning to Rockport and engaging 
in the manufacture of lime. He carried on 
an extensive and successful business till 1877, 
shipping the commodity in vessels, of which he 
was part owner, to Charleston, Wilmington, 
and other Southern- markets. 

In the mean time he was prominently iden- 




FRED E. RICHARDS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'47 



tified with the interests of the Republican 
party, and was elected to represent the town of 
Camden in the State legislature in 1872, being 
re-elected in 1873. Although his business 
cares were great, he yielded to the earnest 
solicitations of his townspeople, and in 1875 
served as a member of the Executive Council 
of Governor Dingley, and in 1S76 as a mem- 
ber of Governor Connors's Council. The fol- 
lowing year, 1877, he was appointed State 
Land Agent, but resigned after a short term of 
service. In 1878 he was appointed to the 
Board of Trustees of the Maine Insane Hospital 
at Augusta; and in 1880, Governor Davis, 
recognizing his sagacity, business ability, and 
faithfulness to every trust, appointed him State- 
Hank Examiner, Governor Robie reappointing 
him for the two succeeding terms. 

The duties of this office included the exami- 
nation of kindred institutions, trust companies, 
loan and building associations, and all State 
corporate companies intrusted with the money 
of the people. Mr. Richards held the posi- 
tion in all nine years, and during his incum- 
bency effected some radical changes for the 
better in banking systems, his motto being 
"Safety first, profit second." While he was 
Bank Examiner, the deposits in the savings- 
banks of Maine increased from twenty million 
to forty-three million dollars, the increase- 
being partly due to confidence in the banks, 
inspired by his management. He resigned his 
position as Bank Examiner in 18S8, and subse- 
quently established a private banking house 
at Sg Exchange Street, Portland, in the Jose 
Building. 

In October, 1S93, he was elected President 
of the Union Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
to fill the vacancy caused by the tragic death 
of John E. DeVVitt, at Chester, Mass., and, 
disposing of his private banking interests, took 
his seat in November of that year. Having 
been connected with the corporation for eleven 
years as Director and a member of the Finance 
Committee, he was thoroughly acquainted with 
the standing and workings of the company 
when he took the President's chair. The 
present condition of the enterprise is suc- 
cinctly stated in the following paragraph from 
the Daily Eastern Argus of Portland, dated 
January 30, 1 895: "To have been able to 



make such an excellent gain in surplus as one 
hundred and thirty thousand four hundred and 
ninety dollars is one of the best results of the 
past year, indicating as it does a substantial 
growth in strength, although the statement 
that not a single bond owned by the company 
was in default of interest on the thirty-first 
day of December seems to be even more re- 
markable, in view of the fact that in financial 
circles generally 1S94 was considered to be 
a period of unusual depression, and many rail- 
road properties were under the control of re- 
ceivers. These results, and others equally 
valuable, speak volumes for the present ad- 
ministration, indicating able, economical, and 
judicious management. " 

The home offices of the company are in its 
own building at the corner of Congress and 
Exchange Streets, in the third and fourth 
stories, accessible by an elevator. They arc- 
well lighted and ventilated; and, while lavish 
expenditure has been avoided, they are pin 
vided with every essential for the transaction 
of business. The second story is given up to 
lawyers' offices; and the ground floor is occu- 
pied by the Union Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company and the Portland National Bank, two 
of the most flourishing institutions in the 
State, making the building a most important 
financial centre. 

The Union Safe Deposit and Trust Com- 
pany, of which Mr. Richards is President and 
Director, was organized about a year ago, ami 
transacted business as a safe deposit company 
only until April I, 1895, when it commenced 
business under the trust provisions of its 
charter. Its capital to the amount of two 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars has already 
been subscribed, and fully paid up for that 
purpose. No part of this capital is invested 
in the vault and fixtures used by the corpora- 
tion. The plant is owned by the Union Mut- 
ual Life Insurance Company ; and the company 
has a clean cash capital of two hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars, more than double the 
amount of any trust company in Maine. With 
the National Bank also Mr. Richards has been 
connected since its inception, and was the 
leading spirit in directing its course at it- or 
ganization. In August, 1S89, he was chosen 
President, which position he still occupies. 



I4§ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



This institution has a capital stock of three 
hundred thousand dollars, and has probably 
as large a business as any bank in the 
State, its deposits amounting on an average 
to one million two hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars. 

Mr. Richards is prominently identified with 
many other financial enterprises. He has been 
a Director of the First National Hank since 
1 893 ; is a Director of the Limerick National 
of Limerick, Me. ; the Rockland Trust Com- 
pany of Rockland; the York Light and Heat 
Company of Biddeford ; and a Director in the 
Camden and Rockland Water Company. He 
is intimately connected with the Rockland and 
Thomaston Street Railway and other corporate 
companies; was fiscal agent of the Maine Cen- 
tral Railroad from 1889 to 1893, resigning when 
elected President of the Insurance Company, 
and has been fiscal agent and is a Director of 
the Portland & Rumford Falls Railroad. In 
short, he is a leader in all departments of the 
realm of finance, winning by his integrity 
and unimpeachable judgment the confidence 
of all, and at the same time inspiring esteem 
by his many admirable personal qualities. 

In 1 87 1 Mr. Richards was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Caroline S. Piper, of Rock- 
port, Me., daughter of Captain John D. Piper, 
a representative of an old Rockport family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richards attend the High 
Street Congregational Church. They occupy 
a beautiful residence at i5oVaughan Street, 
which he erected in 1893-94. 




)N. SAMUEL M. BRACKETT, an 
ex-member of the Maine legislature, 
who died at his residence in Cum- 
berland, March 9, 1895, had served 
the public faithfully for many years in various 
positions of responsibility and trust, and was 
highly esteemed for his practical ability and 
sterling traits of character. 

Mr. Brackett was born in Westbrook, Me., 
March 2, 1820. His father, Reuben Brackett, 
who was a native of Cumberland and a farmer 
by occupation, after marriage settled in West- 
brook, where he engaged successfully in agri- 
cultural pursuits. Both he and his wife, 
whose maiden name was Elizabeth Morrill, 



and whose native place was Westbrook, lived 
to an advanced age. 

Samuel M. Brackett received a good educa- 
tion in the schools of Westbrook, and, having 
grown to manhood, early gave much attention 
to public affairs, in the administration of 
which he exhibited sound judgment and good 
executive ability. He was Deputy Sheriff for 
twelve consecutive years, and also served as 
Coroner and in various town offices. In Janu- 
ary, 1855, he moved to the town of Cumber- 
land, where he resided for the lest of his life, 
settling upon a farm of two hundred and fifty 
acres, and devoting his attention with sys- 
tematic energy to various branches of agricult- 
ure, lie was well versed in both State and 
national politics, and was a sagacious man of 
business. He was a member of the Maine 
House of Representatives in 1870, and in 
1879 was again called to the legislative coun- 
cils of the State. 

On January 4, 1855, Mr. Brackett was 
united in marriage with Mrs. Harriet Sturdi- 
vant, daughter of Joseph and Priscilla (W'il 
son) Russell, the former of whom was a native 
of Gray, and the latter of Falmouth. Joseph 
Russell was a house-joiner, and carried on his 
trade in Falmouth in connection with farming. 
He died at the age of sixty-eight years. His 
wife was a daughter of Nathaniel Wilson, who 
was one of the first settlers at Poplar Ridge. 
She was the mother of nine children, five of 
whom are living; namely, Eli, Sarah, Mrs. 
Brackett, Mrs. Lucy Leighton, and Mrs. Eunice 
Loring. Mrs. Russell lived to reach the age of 
eighty-four years. Mrs. Brackett's first hus- 
band, whom she married in February, 1843, was 
Gardner M. Sturdivant, who was born in Cum- 
berland in July, 1820, and died September 5, 
1 85 1 , leaving four sons; namely, William, 
Oscar R , Lyman P., and Allied M., all of 
whom are living. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brackett have had five chil- 
dren, as follows: Alma M., wife of Fairfield 
Whitney, of Feeding Hills, Mass.; Reuben 
G., who resides at home; Phillips Russell, 
who died at the age of twenty-eight ; Anne, 
widow of Samuel K. Hitchings, also residing 
at the parental home; and Harriet, who died 
at the age of seven years. 

Samuel M. Brackett was liberal in his relig- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



149 



ious views, and in politics he was a stanch 
Democrat. He was a member of Ancient 
Landmark Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Portland. 
Mrs. Brackett, an estimable woman, who 
possesses the respect of the entire community, 
still resides upon the Cumberland farm, which 
is carried on by her son, Reuben G. Brackett. 



OHN W. WARREN, a retired cotton 
manufacturer and real estate owner of 
Westbrook, was born at the old Warren 
homestead in that city, January 16, 
1847, son of Louis P. and Sarah (Turner) 
Warren. The family is an old and prominent 
one in Cumberland County, its ancestors hav- 
ing settled in Westbrook previous to the in- 
corporation of the town. 

John Warren, second, Mr. Warren's grand- 
father, was born at the homestead, May 23, 
1776, the day on which his eldest brother 
died, while serving as a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary War. Grandfather Warren, when a 
young man, engaged in mercantile pursuits, 
later founding a successful lumber business 
in Westbrook, where he became prominent in 
the early development of the town, figuring 
conspicuously in its affairs as an able, indus- 
trious, and worthy citizen. He died Septem- 
ber 10, 1845. His wife, Eleanor Lamb, 
whom he married on November 29, 18 10, was 
born in that part of Falmouth which is now 
included within the limits of Westbrook, July 
5, 1785. Their three children were named as 
follows: George, William L., and Louis P. 
Mr. Warren's grandmother died January 13, 

1835- 

Louis P. Warren, Mr. Warren's father, 
passed his boyhood and youth in Westbrook, 
eventually taking up his permanent residence 
at the homestead. His wife, Sarah Turner, 
was born in Otisfield, May 21, 1S18. She be- 
came the mother of five children, namely: 
John W., the subject of this sketch; Albert 
F. ; Lelia A.; Edna A.; and Cora B. 

John W. Warren commenced his education 
in the public schools of Westbrook, supple- 
menting his knowledge of the elementary 
branches by advanced studies at the Gorham 
Academy and Limington Academy, and finish- 
ing with a business course at a commercial col- 



lege in Portland. He began active life by en- 
tering the grocery business in Westbrook as a 
member of the firm of H. P. Murch & Co. ; and 
he continued as a partner in that concern for 
some seven years, when he withdrew. He 
then associated himself with W. K. Dana, and 
engaged in cotton manufacturing, four years 
later becoming sole proprietor of the establish- 
ment, and conducting the business for twenty 
years, or until his retirement in February, 
1894, which was caused by failing health. 
His connection with the manufacturing indus- 
tries of Westbrook was characterized by a 
steady advance, his business ability asserting 
itself prominently in placing and maintaining 
his enterprise upon a firm financial basis, and 
his capital invested being made to yield the 
most satisfactory returns. Since relinquish- 
ing active business pursuits, he has given his 
attention to the management and care of his 
real estate interests, which embrace much val- 
uable land, together with several tenement- 
houses, from which he derives a handsome in- 
come. 

On November 7, 1872, Mr. Warren was 
married to Martha J. Hawkes, of Medway, 
Mass., daughter of Ahijah Hawkes, and has 
two sons, namely: John Clifford, who was born 
September 29, 1879; and Louis P., who was 
born August 6, 1890. John Clifford is now 
attending the Westbrook High School, and 
Louis P. has entered the primary grade. 

Mr. Warren is connected with Saccarappa 
Lodge, No. 11, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and Cummings Encampment. 
Though not an office-seeker, he takes a lively 
interest in public affairs, possessing a thor- 
ough understanding of local. State, and na- 
tional political issues: and his influence is 
always used in securing the election of able 
candidates for positions of responsibility and 
trust. Mr. and Mrs. Warren are members of 
the First Congregational Church. 



ONATHAN II. FLETCHER, senior 
member of the firm of Fletcher & Co., 
wholesale grocers, provision and flour 
dealers, of Portland, Me., was born in 
Westford, Mass., July 27, 1S22, son of Adams 
and Abigail (Davis) Fletcher. Mr. Fletcher 



■5° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



represents the seventh generation of his family 
in this country, the line being traced as 
follows: — 

Robert Fletcher, who was born in York- 
shire, England, in 1592, settled in Concord, 
Mass., in 1630, in which year seventeen ships 
arrived in Massachusetts Bay, swelling the 
number of settlers to twenty-one thousand. 
He was then thirty-eight years of age. His 
name appears in the earliest records of the 
town of Concord, Mass. ; and in the court files 
of Middlesex County it frequently occurs, ap- 
pended to petitions for bridges, on jury lists, 
and in other connections. He was a wealthy 
and influential man. He died at Concord, 
April 3, 1677, aged eighty-five years. He 
reared five sons — Luke, William, Cary, Sam- 
uel, and Francis. 

William Fletcher, the second son, was born 
in England in 1622, and was eight years old 
when his father settled in Concord. He was 
one of the first settlers in Chelmsford, Mass., 
locating there in 1653, his tract of land em- 
bracing what is now the city of Lowell. He 
died November 6, 1677. His wife, Lydia 
Bates, whom he married in Concord, October 
7, 1645, survived him many years, dying Oc- 
tober 12, 1704. They reared five children, 
namely: Lydia, who married the Rev. John 
Fiske; Joshua; Paul; Sarah; and William. 
Joshua Fletcher was born March 30, 1648, and 
died November 21, 171 3. May 4, 1668, he 
was married to Grissies Jewell, who died Jan- 
uary 16, 1682; and July 18, 1682, he was 
united to his second wife, Sarah Willey. He 
reared the following children: Joshua; Paul; 
Rachel; Timothy; John; Joseph; Sarah, who 
married March 14, 1709, Thomas Reed; Jon- 
athan; Elizabeth; and Jonas. 

Joseph Fletcher, who was commonly known 
as Captain Fletcher, was born in Chelmsford, 
Mass., June 10, 1689, and died October 4, 
1772. He married November 17, 171 2, Sarah 
Adams, of Concord, Mass., who was born in 
1 69 1, and died April 24, 1761. They were 
the parents of ten children, all of whom were 
born in Westford, Mass., where the parents 
settled soon after marriage, and spent the re- 
mainder of their lives. These children were 
named as follows: Joseph, Benjamin, Tim- 
othy, Thomas, Sarah, Edith, Pelatiah, Joshua, 



Ruth, and Mary. Pelatiah Fletcher, who also 
was called Captain Fletcher, was born May 3. 
1727, and died February 23, ^807. He was 
twice married. His first wife, Dorothy Hil- 
dreth, to whom he was united January 13, 
1757, was born August 26, 1736, and was the 
daughter of James Hildreth. She died June 
14, 1782. The second wife, who became Mrs. 
Fletcher October 13, 1782, was widow Betty 
Reyes, born Hartwell. Captain Pelatiah 
Fletcher was the father of twelve children, 
namely: Betsey, born December 15, 1757; 
Dorothy, born December 21, 1759; Joseph, 
born November 6, 1761, who died December 
25, 1765; Sarah, born August 12, 1763. who 
died August 22, 1783; Lucy, born November 
14, 1765, who died July 1, 1766: Pelatiah; 
Joseph; Lucy; Adams, born March 10, 1773, 
who died September 27, 1775; Ezra; Polly; 
and a second Adams, born August 17, 1779. 

Adams Fletcher was by occupation a farmer, 
and spent the greater part of his life in West- 
ford, Mass. He was twice married, his first 
wife being Betsey Bateman, of Chelmsford, 
Mass., to whom he was united May 27, 1806; 
his second, Abigail Davis. Adams Fletcher 
was the father of six children, namely: 
Adams, born January 16, 1807; Betsey, born 
September 12, 1808, who was married in 1834 
to Levi Tufts, of Groton, Mass.; Elzina, born 
April 17, 1 8 10, who was married March 1, 
1832, to James Bobbins; Potter Kimball, 
born December 28, 1 8 I 3 ; Abigail Davis, burn 
September 17, 1817, who was married Septem- 
ber 24, 1842, to Theophilus C. Hersey, ol 
Portland, Me.; and Jonathan Hartwell, the 
subject of this sketch. 

Jonathan Hartwell Fletcher attended the 
common schools of his native town, and grad- 
uated from the academy. In 1841 he obtained 
a position as clerk in the grocery store of 
Smith & Hersey in Portland; and in 1843 he 
was taken into partnership, the firm name be- 
coming Smith, Hersey & Co. He subse- 
quently bought Mr. Smith's interest; and busi- 
ness was transacted thereafter in the name of 
Hersey, Fletcher & Co. This partnership 
lasted several years, the next change making the 
firm name Fletcher & Co., Mr. Franklin Fox 
becoming a partner. Some years later Mr. 
Fletcher bought the share of Mr. Fox, and was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



IS 1 



joined in the enterprise by Mr. Edwin Tom- 
linson. The latter subsequently sold his inter- 
est, and the business is now entirely in the 
hands of the Fletcher family. Mr. Fletcher 
is a man of great business ability, shrewdness, 
and foresight, who has made his way, step 
by step, from a subordinate position to that of 
head of one of the largest mercantile estab- 
lishments in Portland. The business, which 
was founded in 1835, commands a first-class 
patronage: and the large stores at 241 Com- 
mercial and 2, 4, and 6 Union Streets bear 
every sign of good management and pros- 
perity. 

In September, 1852, Mr. Fletcher was 
united in marriage with Mary J. West, daugh- 
ter of Henry N. and Sarah J. (Gordon) West. 
Their children are: George H., born October 
1, 1S54, who became associated in business 
with his father on the retirement of Mr. 
Tomlinson; Henry Adams, born January 29, 
185S, who also is a member of the firm of 
Fletcher & Co.; Clementine, born June 1, 
1862; Marion, born July 9, 1867, who died 
August 26, 1868: and Mary, attending school 
in Boston. 

In politics Mr. Fletcher favors the Repub- 
lican party, but is a strong Cleveland man. 
He served on the Common Council of Portland 
two years. He is a prominent Odd Fellow, 
belonging to Ligonia Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and Eastern Star En- 
campment. The family are members of the 
Universalist church. They have a beautiful 
home at 366 Spring Street. 




,HARLES B. KNEELAND, a well- 
known resident of Bridgton, Cumber- 
land County, Me., was born in 
August, 1846, in the neighboring 
town of Harrison, being the youngest son of 
Simeon and Hannah (Richardson) Kneeland, 
and one of a family of seven sons and three 
daughters. 

Mr. Kneeland was reared on a farm, where 
he became familiar with the care of stock; 
and, having a genuine Yankee shrewdness and 
fondness for trade, he began life for himself 
at the age of fifteen as a dealer in horses. He 
subsequently removed to Waterford, in Oxford 



County, where he remained four years, being 
a portion of the time in the dry-goods busi- 
ness, going thence to Connecticut, where 
for about a year he had charge of one of the 
departments of the Reform School. Return- 
ing to the place of his nativity, Mr. Knee- 
land remained there but a short time before 
going to Worcester, where he was engaged as 
a horse trainer for a year. He then engaged 
in the same profitable business for ten consec- 
utive years in Bridgton, buying horses, which 
he shipped to the Boston market, and at length 
established a livery stable, which he has since 
managed in connection with his other occupa- 
tions, having purchased his present stand in 
1 88 1. Besides buying and selling horses he 
has made a thorough study of the care of the 
animals, in which he has a large practice, and 
has won a reputation as a skilful veterinary 
surgeon. He has also invested in real estate 
in this vicinity, being the possessor of twenty- 
eight acres of land, on which there is a val- 
uable mineral spring. 

Mr. Kneeland was married in 1871 to Miss 
Sarah E. Griswold, who has borne him three 
children; namely, Lillie, Florence, and Amy. 
Lillie is the wife of Byron Harnden, of this 
town. In politics Mr. Kneeland is a zealous 
advocate of the principles of the Republican 
party. 




( S |^ LBION N. WATERHOUSE, a well- 
known farmer of Gorham, is a native 
of Cumberland County, Standish 
being the place of his birth, and 
January 2, 1830, the date thereof. He is the 
worthy representative of one of the early 
pioneers of the county, his great-grandfather, 
Joseph Waterhouse, having removed from 
Marblehead, Mass., to Standish, prior to the 
Revolutionary War, in which he fought for 
American independence. He cleared a large 
tract of land from the forest, improving a 
farm, on which he spent his remaining days, 
dying at the ripe old age of fourscore and 
ten years. He was an old-time Whig in poli- 
tics. 

William II. Waterhouse, son of Joseph, was 
born and reared in Standish, Me., becoming a 
most successful farmer and lumberman and a 



'5 : 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



citizen of prominence. He married Sarah 
Smith, a daughter of Ephraim Smith, of Gor- 
ham; and they reared a family of nine chil- 
dren, Thomas, Albion's father, being the 
third son. Both grandparents were members 
of the Baptist church. The last years of the 
grandfather's life were spent in Gorham. 

Thomas Waterhouse, a native of Standish, 
was born on April 4, 1802. In his early ac- 
tive life he worked six years at the cotton-mill 
in Little Falls, Windham, but subsequently 
turned his attention to agriculture, buying a 
farm of eighty acres in the town of Standish, 
where he lived for fifty-five years, prosperously 
engaged in tilling the soil. On the death of 
his wife, in 1875, he removed to Gorham, mak- 
ing his home with his son Albion until his 
demise, May 9, 1888. His wife, Miriam 
Estes, whom he married in 1828, was a daugh- 
ter of John Estes, of Raymond, Me. Of the 
four children born to them, two are now living 
— Albion N. and Hannah E. The latter, 
who was born in June, 1832, in Standish, is 
the wife of Zachariah Gilman, and a faithful 
member of the Baptist church. 

Albion N. Waterhouse was reared on the 
home farm and attended the district school. 
He early chose farming as his chief occupa- 
tion, although he has worked a good deal at 
the carpenter's trade, being very skilful in the 
use of tools. He remained with his parents 
until 1 STxj, when he purchased his homestead 
property, where he has since lived. This farm 
contains fifty acres of fertile land, which he 
successfully manages, paying especial atten- 
tion to manufacturing butter, some years mak- 
ing and selling as many as fifteen hundred 
pounds. He also retains sixty acres of wood 
and timber land in Standish. In politics he 
affiliates with the Democrats. 

Mr. Waterhouse was married November 6, 
1 8 54, to Mary Ann Meserve, daughter of 
Robert Meserve, of Westbrook. She was 
born November 25, 183 1, being the second 
child in a family of five children. The union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Waterhouse has been 
brightened by the birth of six children - 
George Howard, Mary Ellen, Almon N., 
Frank W., Fred T., and Ilarland R. George 
Howard Waterhouse, born June 10, 1856, mar- 
ried Tina B. Estes, of Gorham: and they have 



two children — Ralph and Leon. He is a 
Republican in politics, and his wife is a 
member of the Baptist church. Mary Ellen 
Waterhouse, born August 6, 1859, is the wife 
of Albert H. Mosher of this town, and has 
two children — Lydia M. and Albert E. She 
is a member of the Congregationalist church, 
and Mr. Mosher is a Republican in politics. 
Almon N., born February 18, 1862, married 
Annie Leighton, of Cumberland Mills. Ik- 
is a Democrat in politics, as is also Frank W., 
who was born February 2, 1867, and married 
Dora Bickford, of Saccarappa. Fred T. and 
Harland R., twins, were born April 4, 1871. 
They are Democrats, and they still live be- 
neath the parental roof-tree. These two young 
men possess great native mechanical ingenu- 
ity, and are continually at work with their 
tools. In 1894 they built a workshop, where 
they have a boiler and engine, and do all kinds 
of wood and iron work. They are rarely sepa- 
rated, finding their chief pleasure in eai h 
other's company. 



OSIAH HAYDEN DRUMMON1), 
LL. D. , who is widely known as one ol 
the ablest lawyers in the State of Maine 
and a distinguished leader in the Ma 
sonic fraternity, was born in Winslow, Kenne- 
bec County, August 30, 1S27, son of Clark and 
Cynthia (Blackwell) Drummond. His pater- 
nal ancestors, who were Scotch-Irish Presby- 
terians, emigrated to Maine and settled in 
Georgetown, then including Bath, etc., in 
1729, when that thriving port was hardly more 
than a pioneer settlement; and in Georgetown 
his great-grandfather, John Drummond, a 
farmer and mariner, died in 1775. He was 
the father of John, second, who was born a few 
months later. 

The childhood of John Drummond, second, 
was passed in Georgetown, but during the 
greater part of his mature life he was engaged 
in farming in Winslow. He married Miss 
Damaris Hayden, whose father, Colonel Josiah 
Hayden, moved to Winslow about 1785, pur- 
chasing the farm adjoining the Drummond 
homestead. Colonel Hayden was a man of 
sterling worth, prominent in town affairs and 
highly respected. He served during the Revo- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'S3 



lutionary War as a Major anil afterward was 
a Colonel in the State militia. Through him 
the subject of the present sketch is eligible 
as a member of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. 

Clark Drummond, son of John and Damaris 
(Ilayden) Drummond, was born in Winslow, 
Mi-., July 5, 1796. lie was a prosperous 
farmer, owning and occupying the farm on 
which lie was born, and was an influential and 
an esteemed citizen, taking an active part in 
promoting the general welfare. He served 
in various town offices, 'and for many years as 
Justice of the 1'eace. He died in 1888, at the 
advanced age of ninety-two years and five 
months. His wife, Cynthia Blackwell, was 
born in Winslow, January 17, 1799, and died 
in 1 868. She was the daughter of Captain 
Mordecai Blackwell, who had removed to 
Winslow from Sandwich shortly before her 
birth. Ten children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Clark Drummond, eight of whom are 
now living, Josiah H., David 11., and Charles 
1.. being residents of Portland, and the other 
live making their homes in Kennebec County. 

Josiah Hayden Drummond passed his early 
days on his father's farm at Winslow, making 
the most of the limited educational facilities 
offered by the district school and distinguish- 
ing himself by his proficiency in mathematics, 
lie later attended Vassalboro Academy, where 
he mastered Colburn's Algebra when thirteen 
years old; and lie was subsequently assistant 
teacher of mathematics at the Academy. 
haltering Colby University, he there also 
gained a high reputation as a mathematician, 
and was graduated with honor in j S46, receiv- 
ing three years later the degree of A. M. He 
taught school for three years, in the mean time- 
studying law with Messrs. Boutelle & Noyes 
at Waterville, and was admitted to the bar at 
Augusta in 1S50. That same year — the 
period of the great exodus to the gold country 
— he made a business trip to California, trav- 
elling by way of the Isthmus, and became a 
member of the bar in that State also. Return- 
ing to Waterville in 185 1, he rapidly rose to 
prominence in his profession and in politics. 

Though affiliated with the Democratic party 
by family tradition and training, he left its 
ranks in 1S55 on account of his antagonism to 



slavery, and the following year did efficient 
work in the interest of the Republicans, 
spending nearly eight weeks on the stump ami 
speaking twice and often three times a day. 
In 1857, while absent from home, he was 
nominated by the Republicans for the lower 
branch of the legislature, without his knowl- 
edge, and was elected. The next year he was 
re-elected and chosen Speaker, making a 
record of ability that has never been surpassed 
and, in the opinion of many, never equalled in 
the State. In 1859 he was elected Senator 
from Kennebec County, but resigned bis seat 
to accept the position of Attorney-general of 
the State. He was re-elected in 1861, 1862, 
and 1863; but the following year he declined 
in order to devote himself entirely to the work 
of his profession. In i860 he moved to Port- 
land, and was from that city also elected to the 
legislature, and subsequently chosen Speaker, 
as a matter of course. He declined re-elec- 
tion. In 1864 he was a member of the 
Republican National Convention that renomi- 
nated Lincoln, and he was also an active mem- 
ber of the conventions that nominated Hayes 
and Blaine. Since 1864 he has uniformly de 
clined to be a candidate for office, preferring, 
to devote his time to the demands of his pro- 
fession. His name was prominently men- 
tioned for Governor and United States Sena- 
tor, and there is little doubt that he would 
have received the nominations had he been 
desirous of receiving them ; and a chair on the 
Supreme Bench of the State might have been 
his bad he cared to take it. 

He has been City Solicitor of Portland for. 
man)' years, and is the attorney of important . 
corporations. In 1S51 he was connected with, 
the Androscoggin & Kennebec Railroad, and 
111 1864 was elected Director of the Maine 
Central Railroad, with which it became con 
solidated. He resigned his office in 1871 
in order to facilitate the consolidation of the 
Maine Central with the Portland & Kennebec, 
in which he took an active part, and soon after 
became clerk of the corporation. This posi- 
tion he still holds by virtue of successive 
annual re-elections, and, as chief counsel of the 
roads, has engaged in many legal contests both 
before the courts and the legislature. In 1875 
he was elected Director of the Union Mutual 



'54 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Life Insurance Company, was active in its re- 
organization, and has been its general counsel 
since, and shaped the legislation that moved 
the company to Maine. He has been a 
1 line tur also of the Union Safe Deposit and 
Trust Company of Portland since its organiza- 
tion. 

Especially noteworthy are his achievements 
in behalf of the Masonic fraternity; for, after 
Thomas Smith Webb, who gave form to 
Masonry in this country, no man has done 
more for the ancient craft than Mr. Drum- 
mond. He joined the Waterville Lodge in 
[849, and was its Master in 1858-59. From 
1860 to 1863 he was Grand Master of the 
('.mihI Lodge of Maine, and was for two years 
at the head of the Grand Chapter and Grand 
Commandery of Maine, and one year at the 
Ik id of the Grand Council of Maine. In 
1871 he was elected to the chief position of 
the General Grand Chapter of the United 
States, and in 1880 was Grand Master of the 
General Grand Council of the United States, 
holding each office three years. He was Pro- 
vincial Deputy Grand Master of the Royal 
Order of Scotland under the late Albeit Pike, 
and since Mr. Pike's death has been Provincial 
Grand Master. In 1859 and 1862 he received 
the degree of the Scottish Rite, and in the 
latter year the thirty third degree was con- 
ferred upon him, making him an honorary 
member of the Supreme Council of the North- 
ern Jurisdiction of the United States. He 
was immediately elected Lieutenant Grand 
Commander, and was re-elected in 1863 and 
1 866. In 1867, upon the union of the Su- 
preme Councils previously existing, he was 
elected Grand Commander of the United Su- 
preme Council, the highest office in the gift 
of the fraternity. 1 Ie was re-elected in 1870, 
1873, and 1S76, but declined further service. 
This office was no sinecure, involving a large 
amount of correspondence with all parts of the 
world. As Chairman of the Committee on 
Masonic Jurisprudence in the grand bodies of 
Maine and in the national bodies, Mr. Drum- 
miniil has done more than any one else to shape 
the polity of the Order in the State and nation. 
In his own Grand Lodge he has for thirty years 
performed the duty of reviewing the proceed- 
ings of the other Grand Lodges — over fifty in 



number — his report often comprising more 
than two hundred pages. He has also per- 
formed a similar labor for the Grand Chapter, 
Council, and Commandery. In these reports 
questions of Masonic law, usage, polity, and 
duty are discussed; and the reviewers of other 
Grand Lodges concede to Mr. Drummond the 
first position as to ability and influence. Mr. 
Drummond has filled other Masonic offices and 
performed other duties that we have not space 
to enumerate. He is widely known and his 
acquaintance eagerly sought by the brethren 
in Europe and America, few of the hundreds 
of thousands of Masons in this country being 
unacquainted with his name. 

Mr. Drummond is a working member of the 
Maine Historical Society, of the Maine Gen- 
ealogical Society, of the Old Colon)- Society 
of Taunton, Mass., and of the New England 
Historical Genealogical Society of Boston. 
He is well versed in State and local history, 
and has preserved much important historical 
and genealogical data for the benefit of future 
generations, as some extensive compilations to 
be published shortly will bear witness. His 
talents in this direction have also been exerted 
for the benefit of the Masonic Order. He 
wrote the history of the Portland Lodge, the 
work containing about three hundred and fifty 
pages; compiled the Maine Masonic Text- 
book ; which for some years has been a stand- 
ard work on Masonry and which has passed 
into the fourth edition, each succeeding edition 
being revised and enlarged; assisted in the 
compilation of the Maine Royal Arch Text- 
book; and compiled a large part of the ap- 
pendix (two hundred and fifty pages) to Yor- 
ston's edition of Gould's "History of PTee 
Masonry," which is a valuable and much quoted 
work. He also edited, jointly with J. Ross 
Robertson, of Toronto, Canada, the "History 
of the Cryptic Rite," published by the latter 
in 1888. Two articles, "Masonic Jurispru- 
dence" and "Scottish Rite," he prepared lor 
a work entitled "History of Free Masonry and 
Concordant Orders." 

On December 10, 1850, Mr. Drummond was 
united in marriage with Elzada Rollins Bean, 
daughter of Benjamin Wadleigh and Lucetta 
(Foster) Bean. She was born March 2, 1829, 
in Montville, Me., but at the time of her mar- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'55 



riage was a resident of New York City- Her 

father was a son of Phineas and Hannah (Clif- 
ford) Bean, born in Candia, N.H., March 31, 
1804. Phineas Bean was the son of Jonathan 
and Mar)' (Leavitt) Bean, born in Candia, 
Jul}' 25, 1763. He removed with his family 
to Montville, Me., in 1808, and died there 
October 16, 1838. Four children have 
blessed the union of Mr. and Mis. Drum- 
mond, namely: Myra Lucetta ; Josiah Hayden, 
Jr., associated with his father in legal work, 
the name of the firm being Drummond & 
Drummond; Tinnie Aubigne, wife of Wilford 
G. Chapman ; and Marge] ia Bean. 

Mr. Drummond still keeps up his connec- 
tion with his Alma Mater, Colby University, 
which conferred upon him the degree of LL. D. 
twenty-five years after graduation, the honor 
being a complete surprise to him. He was 
the first President of the D. K. E. Society, 
and presided at its fiftieth anniversary in 
July, 1895; and he has served on the Board of 
Trustees of the institution longer than any 
other member, except two, having been elected 
in 1857. For many years he has been Vice- 
President of the corporation and Chairman, 
ex officio, of the Board of Trustees. 

In religious belief Mr. Drummond is a 
liberal Christian, attending and supporting the 
Unitarian church. He is a man of great de- 
termination, and yet is very kind-hearted, find- 
ing it difficult to say "no" when his sym- 
pathies are appealed to. He is especially kind 
to young men ; and he will drop his own work, 
though ever so busy, to answer the appeal of a 
young lawyer for help in a legal problem, not 
only responding, but taking time to enlarge on 
the theme. A man of large figure and com- 
manding presence, his personality presents 
a rare combination of physical, mental, and 
moral sifts. 




|ORNELIUS N. MORRELL, a prac- 

.. tical and successful agriculturist of 
Windham, Cumberland County, 
Me., son of the late Stephen Mor- 
rell, was born in this town, May 17, 1837. 

Jacob Morrell, father of Stephen, was born 
in the town of Falmouth, whence in the latter 
part of the eighteenth century he removed to 



Windham, and, purchasing sixty-five acres ol 
wild land, cleared and improved a good farm, 
residing on it until his death, which occurred 
when he was about sixty-eight years of age. 
He was twice married, his first wife, the 
grandmother of Cornelius, being Hannah 
Brackett. She bore him six children, Stephen 
being the third child and the second son. 

Stephen Morrell, a native of Windham, was 
born December 31, 1S03, and was line early 
initiated into the various branches of labor 
pertaining to tilling the soil and raising stock, 
which occupations he followed through his 
busy life of eighty-four years, dying here in 
1S87. He was a stanch supporter of the prin- 
ciples of the Democratic part)', and, religious!)', 
was a Universalist. On March 11, 1827, he 
married Lydia Hawkes, daughter of Ebenezer 
Hawkes, of Windham; and into their family 
circle eight children were born, the four now 
living being Catherine II., Cornelius N., 
James K., and Martha L. Catherine 11 
Morrell, born December 19, 1S29, is the 
widow of William Shaw, of Standish. 
James K., horn October 27, 1846, now living 
in Boston, married Isabelle Field, of this town, 
and they have two children — Elroy F., born 
August 20, 1S76; and Marion, born in 1889. 
Martha L., born April 4, 1849, is the wife of 
Edward S. Thayer, of Westbrook, Me., and 
has five children, namely: Stephen P., born 
September 5, 1873, who married November 
16, 1895, Nellie Rumery, of Biddeford, Me. ; 
Edna P., born in October, 1875; Laban IP, 
born in February, 1S77; Clifton, bom in 
February, 1879; and Henry P., born in 
April, 1888. 

Cornelius N. Morrell having completed lii^ 
course of study at the Westbrook Seminary, 
during the following year taught school in 
Windham, and from that time until 1865 
worked at agricultural pursuits. Deciding 
then to try life on the Pacific Coast, he went 
to California, where he worked four years in 
the mines. Returning to the place of his 
nativity, Mr. Morrell again worked for a while 
at farming, and afterward went to North Gra) 
and bought a grocery store, remaining there 
two years. In 1S75 he purchased his present 
farm, which under his skilful management now 
ranks as one of the best in its improvements 



'56 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and appointments of any in the vicinity, 
leventy-five acres of it being under culture. 

His judgment and ability in administrative 
affairs arc well appreciated by his fellow- 
citizens, who have often placed him in official 
positions, being sure that he would give them 
most faithful and efficient service. In 1884 
and [885 he was Selectman of the town, being 
I liiirman of the Board the last year. In 1892 
he was chosen Selectman to fill the unexpired 
term of the late Charles Rogers, and was re- 
elected to the same position the succeeding 
year, being Chairman of the Board the last 
year. In politics he is a zealous advocate of 
the principles of the Democratic party, and in 
his religious views he is liberal. Socially, 
Mr. Morrell is a Mason, belonging to Pre- 
sumpscott Lodge, No. 127, A. F. & A. M., 
of Windham; a Royal Arch Mason of Lagle 
Chapter, X<>. 11, of Westbrook; and is also a 
Knight of Pythias, being a member of Ori- 
ental Lodge, No. 17, of South Windham. Mr. 
Morrell was united in marriage December 16, 
[868, with Lydia A. Varney, daughter of Hiram 
Varney, of this town. 




ilIAKI.LS E. BOODY, a burner resi- 
dent of Westbrook and one of the best- 
known citizens of his day, was born 
at the old Boody homestead, June 22, 
iXii), son of Benjamin and Jane C. (Winslow) 
Boody. Mr. Boody's father was an extensive 
and practical farmer and a lifelong resident of 
Westbrook', who figured quite prominently in 
the town affairs. He was a man who could 
be depended upon for the fulfilment of his 
obligations, as he always adhered to his Quaker 
precepts in his every-day life, his religious 
views being in accordance with the teachings 
of the denomination founded by George Fox. 
lie, however, availed himself of his citizenship 
privileges by taking part in political affairs, 
in which he supported the Democratic party; 
and he rendered his share of service to the 
town as Collector of Taxes. 

Charles E. Boody commenced his education 
in the public schools of Westbrook, and com- 
pleted his course of stud)- at the seminary. 
At an early age he became familiar with farm 
work by assisting in the lighter labors of the 



home fields; and in young manhood he taught 
school at different places during the winter 
season, his summers being spent in agricult- 
ural pursuits. After the death of his father 
he was employed during the summers for about 
five years in brick-making, working in the 
brickyards of Henry M. Minot, who conducted 
the manufacture in that part of Westbrook 
which is now included within the town of 
Deering. Returning then to the old home- 
stead, he continued to reside here for the rest 
of his life. The Boody farm contains two 
hundred acres of valuable and well-located 
land, including tillage, pasture, and wood 
land; and the late owner improved the prop- 
erty to a considerable extent, increasing the 
productiveness of the soil and making addi- 
tions to the residence and out-buildings. He- 
was an able and energetic farmer, liberal and 
progressive in his ideas, and a citizen of the 
highest repute, a man in whose integrity his 
friends and neighbors placed the most implicit 
confidence. 

In politics he supported the Republican 
party. His incumbency of the positions of pub- 
lic trust in which he was called upon to serve 
was characterized by a good understanding of 
both local and State affairs and a careful con- 
sideration of the people's interests. For fif- 
teen years he served as a member of the School 
Committee of Westbrook, a portion of which 
he was Chairman of the Board. He was a 
member of the Board of Selectmen for the 
years 1S76 and 1877, and represented his 
district in the legislature dining the session 
of 1878. He was connected with Saccarappa 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
previous to its reorganization, and was a mem- 
ber of the Citizens' Relief Society of Portland. 
In his religious belief he preserved the tradi- 
tions of his ancestors and adhered to the 
Quaker doctrine, his mother having been a 
member of the Society of Friends. He died 

on April 9, 1S95, at the 1! ly homestead, 

where the greater portion of his life had been 
passed. His many exemplary qualities of 
heart and mind are well remembered by his 
wide circle of friends and acquaintances, who 
recognized and appreciated in his lifetime his 
genuine worth. 

In 1849 Mr. Boody was united in marriage 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



■57 



with Elizabeth W. Walker, the ceremony 
taking place in Casco. Mrs. Boody was born 
in Otisfield, Me., daughter of Daniel and 
Elizabeth (Mayberry) Walker, who were pros- 
perous farming people. Her parents reared a 
family of seven children, Elizabeth W. -being 
the first-born. She has one brother and two 
sisters now living, namely: Daniel H., a resi- 
dent of Mechanic Falls, Me. ; Rebecca A., 
widow of Spencer Decker, of Casco; and Mary 
W. , wife of James Jepson, of Casco. 

Mrs. Boody still resides at the homestead, 
and the farm is conducted under her manage- 
ment. She harvests from fifty to seventy-five 
tons of hay annually, and keeps seven head of 
cattle and two horses, these facts showing that 
under her direction the property has not been 
allowed to deteriorate, the high standard of 
cultivation being maintained which has 
marked its history for so many years. 



OHN GOLDING BUNTING, M.D., 
of Portland, one of the oldest physi- 
cians in the State, who has practised 
medicine for sixty years, is a native of 
St. Johns, N.B. , born September 4, 1820. His 
parents were the Rev. Joshua and Elizabeth 
(Golding) Bunting. His mother, born in 
New Brunswick, was the daughter of Isaac 
Gerow, who was a refugee from New York at 
the time of the Revolution. Elizabeth grew 
to womanhood in her native province, where 
she was first married to Mr. Isaac Golding, and 
some years later to the Rev. Joshua Bunting, 
a minister of the Baptist denomination and a 
native of Clifton, England. 

Dr. Bunting acquired his early education in 
the private schools of New Brunswick, after- 
ward beginning the study of medicine with 
Dr. Harding at the quarantine station on 
Partridge Island. Having been under Dr. 
Harding's instructions for about two years, he 
crossed the Atlantic and pursued his studies 
successively at Edinburgh, Scotland, and the 
Drummond Street Medical School in Glasgow. 
He remained in the latter institution until 
licensed to practise. After this he obtained 
a position as ship physician on the "Britannia, " 
one of the Cunard steamers, which were then 
side-wheel boats, and held it for eighteen 



months. Subsequently the Doctor attended 
lectures at the Boston Medical School, while 
in the city having an opportunity to listen to 
many distinguished speakers, and attended the 
famous murder trial of Professor Webster, who 
killed Dr. Parkman in 1849. Going then to 
New York, Dr. Bunting attended lectures 
under Dr. Valentine Mott at the Crosby Street 
School of Medicine. On his return to Boston 
he was advised to open up practice in Bangor, 
Me., which he did, and remained three years. 
During that time he boarded in a house with 
John A. Peters, now Judge Peters, anil two 
other young men who have since won the same 
title. He next practised in Montreal, Canada. 
While here he was one of the favored few al- 
lowed to study the actual process of digestion 
through an opening made in the stomach of St. 
Martin. Dr. Bunting was then invited to 
spend a week in New York by Dr. Delafield, 
the celebrated physician and surgeon. He 
afterward accompanied St. Martin on a tour 
through the Central and Southern States, visit- 
ing the hospitals and medical colleges in every 
city of importance, and then went abroad with 
him and visited in the same way the medical 
colleges of London, Paris, Italy, Spain, Berlin, 
Vienna, Belgium, and Russia. The succeed- 
ing sixteen years the Doctor spent in travelling 
in Europe, gaining valuable information in the 
leading medical colleges, spending three years 
in Paris and two years in London, and subse- 
quently some time under the instructions of 
the world-renowned physician, Dr. McKenzie, 
of London. Returning to this country Dr. 
Bunting first located in Cleveland. Thence 
he went to Detroit, and afterward spent some- 
time at Niagara Falls and New York City. 
He gave up his work there in May, 1 8gi , to 
come to Portland, where he has since acquired 
an extensive practice. 




TEPHEN B. HAMILTON, a gen- 
eral merchant at Chebeague Island, 
in the town of Cumberland, Me., is 
a native-born citizen, the date of 
his birth being October 1, 1841. He is de- 
scended from one of the early settlers of the 
island, his great-great-grandhither, Ambrose 
Hamilton, having located here in 1760. He 



'5» 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was a thrifty and prosperous farmer, as were 
his son, Ambrose, Jr., and later his grandson, 
James 1 [amilton. 

Simeon Hamilton, son of James, Was born 
on Chebeague Island, April 6, 1S06. For 
forty-five years he followed the sea, cruising 
on the Maine coast between Portland and 
Bangor. In his earlier years he was Captain 
oi a packet, carrying, besides general freight, 
much granite. lie afterward owned different 
sloops, among them being the "Granite" and 
the •'Leader." In 1864 Captain Hamilton 
gave up his seafaring life, and purchased a farm 
of fifty acres, mostly under cultivation, and 
there spent his remaining days, dying Decem- 
ber 11, 1SS0. He was twice married. His 
first wife, formerly Sarah Bennett, died Octo- 
ber 28, 1863, having been the mother of thir- 
teen children. Nine of this family are now 
living, the following being a brief record: 
Elmira, born October 2, 1828, is the wife of 
Alfred Cleaves, of- Yarmouth, and has three 
children — Alfred E., Emily S., and Myra 
A.; Hiram K., born May 21, 1830, married 
Margarette Anthoine, of Cape Elizabeth, and 
they have four children living — Daniel A., 
William H., Emily M., and Edwin D. ; Mar- 
tha, born October 28, 1S31, is the widow of 
Ellis Mansfield, of the island, and has two 
children living — Ellis F. and Mattie T. ; 
Simeon was born March 19, 1833; Rachel, 
born May 14, 1837, is the wife of Stephen A. 
Woodbury, of South Portland, and has four 
children living — Albert S., Henry D., Ger- 
trude R., and Winfield; Stephen B. is the 
subject of this sketch; Sumner E., born Oc- 
tober 30, 1845, married Sarah J. Webber, of 
tli. island, and they are the parents of three 
children — Edna E., Mildred R., and Lin- 
wood S. ; Alonzo S., born February 2, 1848, 
married Angelette Long, of Chebeague Island, 
and they have five children living — Myra 
C, Emily M., Clifford S., Fanny G., and 
Lewis R.; and Mary E., born February 21, 
1858, married Eldon Merrill, of Portland, and 
has two children — William L. and Fanny M. 
On September 11, 1864, the father was again 
married, Eleanor Stover, daughter of Elisha 
Stover, becoming his second wife; but of this 
union no children were born. 

Stephen B. Hamilton at the age of four- 



teen sailed with his father in the sloop 
"Leader" through the summer season, and 
during the winter months he attended school. 
He continued on the sea, going as a common 
sailor until attaining his majority, when he 
bought an interest in the "Leader." After 
having charge of this craft four years, sailing 
her on the coast of Maine, freighting stone 
principally, he purchased an interest in the 
sloop "Rocky Mountain," of which he had 
control for the next two years. He then set- 
tled down on the island to mercantile life, 
buying an interest in the general store of 
Hamilton & Co., the partnership continuing 
twenty-one years. In 1890 Mr. Hamilton 
purchased his present business, and has since 
been prosperously engaged in the sale of 
general merchandise, having a well-stocked 
country store. In the same year he was ap- 
pointed Postmaster at Chebeague Island, suc- 
ceeding his father's second wife, who had 
charge of the office several years. In his 
political principles Mr. Hamilton is a sound 
Republican, and has served as Selectman of 
the town of Cumberland, performing his duties 
most satisfactorily to the public. He- is at 
the present time a Director of the Cumberland 
Fire Insurance Company of Cumberland. 

Mr. Hamilton and Miss Harriet E. Webber, 
daughter of Benjamin Webber, of Chebeague 
Island, were united in marriage January 2, 
1865. They have three children, namely: 
Cora G., born November 27, 1867; Delia G., 
born July 29, 1877; and P'lorence M., born 
March 12, 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton 
are members of the Methodist church. 




/ILLIS F. STROUT, an influential 

and esteemed citizen of South Port- 
land, Cumberland County, was bom 
in the city of Portland, Me., August 30, 1857. 
He is a descendant of one of the early fami- 
lies of Cape Elizabeth, where his paternal 
grandfather, Daniel Strout, Sr., was born 
December 6, 1802. He there married Jane 
G. Dyer, a native of the same place, the fruit 
of their union being six children, of whom 
four are now living, namely: Joshua I'., 
keeper of the Portland Head Light; William 
D., a cooper, living at South Portland; Mary 







HENRY R. MILLETT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



161 



E., a maiden lady, and Eunice J., widow of 
Captain John B. Waterhou.se, both residing in 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Daniel Strout, Jr., was the third son born 
to his parents, Daniel, Sr., and Jane G. 
Strout, the date of his birth, which occurred 
in Cape Elizabeth, being September 8, 1830. 
After leaving the common schools, he fol- 
lowed for several years the trade of a house 
carpenter, and built quite a number of dwel- 
ling-houses on the Cape. In 1858 he opened 
a grocery store in this town, where he contin- 
ued in business until his death in 1886, build- 
ing up an extensive local trade. He was held 
in high regard by his fellow-citizens, whom he 
represented from 1882 till 1885 in the State 
legislature, being elected on the Democratic 
ticket, which he uniformly supported. Ready 
td espouse liberal views in religion as in other 
matters, he was identified with the Univer- 
salis! church, both he and his wife holding 
to the cheerful faith of that denomination, 
lie married Martha E. Lovett, daughter of 
Jolm Lovett, of Portland, Me., and they 
became the parents of several children, of 
whom but two are living; namely, Willis 
F. and Carrie D., both of South Portland. 
Mrs. Martha E. Strout died on March 3, 
1896, aged sixty years, nine months, and 
twenty-three days. 

Willis F. Strout acquired a practical com- 
mon-school education, afterward beginning his 
active career in his father's store, which he 
entered as a clerk when but sixteen years of 
age. On the death of his father Mr. Strout 
succeeded to the business, continuing it until 
18S9, and then selling out. He subsequently 
bei niie shipping clerk for the well-known firm 
of Twitchell, Champlin & Co., of Portland, 
remaining with them four years. In 1893, 
in company with Sherman G. Willard, he 
opened a grocery store in Cape Elizabeth, now 
South Portland, where, under the firm name of 
Willis F. Strout & Co., he carried on a large 
retail trade until 1895, when he sold his inter- 
est to his partner. At this time, in the 
spring of 1895, by an act of the legislature. 
Cape Elizabeth was divided, the part in which 
Mr. Strout has resided for so many years being 
named South Portland. Mr. Strout, who had 
filled the office of Auditor of Cape Elizabeth 



for three years, was elected a member of the 
first Board of Selectmen of the new town. 

On November 22, 1881, Mr. Strout was 
united in marriage with Miss Eva Smith, a 
daughter of Henry Smith, of Cape Elizabeth. 
They have three children, namely : Daniel II., 
born March 16, 1889; Albert D., born April 
22, 1893; and Harry Willis, born November 
27, 1894. Religiously, Mr. and Mrs. Strout 
are identified with the Universalist church; 
and, politically, he is a steadfast Democrat. 
Socially, he is prominent in many fraternal 
orders, having a membership in the following 
organizations: Hiram Lodge, No. 1S0, A. I-'. 
& A. M.; Unity Lodge, No. 3, I. O. O. T. ; 
Portland Encampment, No. 119, I. ( >. O. T. ; 
Mizpah, Daughters of Rebecca; Grand Canton 
Ridgeley, I. O. O. T. ; and Bayard Lodge, 
No. 44, Knights of Pythias. 




ENRY RIPLEY MILLKTT, of 
Gorham, Cumberland County, Me., 
a gallant officer of the Fifth Maine 
Regiment in the war of the Rebell- 
ion, whose commission as Lieutenant Colonel 
was dated January 8, 1863, was born in Leeds, 
Androscoggin County, Me., September 23, 
1S32, son of Thomas and Elmira A. (Day) 
Millett. He is a cousin of Frank D. Millet, 
the artist, who was Director of Decoration of 
the World's Columbian Exposition at Chicago, 
and, like him, is of the seventh generation in 
descent from the original ancestor (if the 
family in America, Thomas Millet, born at 
Chertsey, England, in 1605, who, with his 
wife and son Thomas, came to this country 
in the "Elizabeth" in [635, and settled in 
Dorchester, Mass., but later removed to Brook - 
field, Mass. 

Colonel Milieu's great-grandfather, Thomas 
Millett, son of John of Gloucester, Mass., and 
a great-grandson of the emigrant, was a 
patriot soldier of the Revolution. He died in 
Leeds, Me. His son Zebulon, the fifth in 
direct line, a farmer in Leeds, reared nine 
children, namely: Solomon; Asa, late a phy- 
sician of East Bridge-water, Mass., father (if 
Frank D. ; David ; Obed ; Thomas ; Aaron ; 
Lydia ; Delia; and Polly. Thomas Millett, 
son of Zebulon, was born in Leeds, January 



I 62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



17, 1 801, and was engaged in early life in 
farming and lumbering in that town. In 1833 
he removed to Palmyra, Somerset County, 
Me., and there spent his last years, dying in 
February, 1874. He was twice married, his 
first wife being Elmira A. Day, who was born 
in Baron, Me., and died in Palmyra, January 
29, 1857. She was the mother of twelve chil- 
dren, namely: Mary D., who was born in 
Baron, July 30, 1829; Samuel Z., born in 
Leeds, December 3, 1830; Henry R., the 
subject dI this sketch; Matthias O., who was 
bom August 31, 1834, in Palmyra, which was 
the birthplace of all the children following; 
Josiah, born January 24, 1837, Lieutenant in 
Company B, Thirtieth Maine Volunteer Infan- 
try of the army during the late war, now agent 
of one of the largest lumber companies in 
Minnesota, and a resilient of Stillwater; Jo- 
seph C, born January 21, 1839, who also 
served the Union and was severely wounded; 
Obed I'"., bom March 17, 1841, who was killed 
at the battle of Cold Harbor; Martha ]., bom 
Line 14, 1843; Thomas F. , born September 
8, 1845, now a Congregational minister and 
Field Secretary of the Maine Sunday-school 
Society, residing in Gorham ; Eliza A., born 
February 24, 1848; Lesta P., bom August 31, 
1850; and Lester W., born September 17, 
1853. Thomas Millett's second wife, Fanny 
S. Gordon, of St. Albans, Me., was the mother 
of six children — Addie D. , George W., Sewall 
1!., Albert K., Annie M., and Nellie N. 

Henry R. Millett acquired a good education 
in the common schools of Palmyra and the 
high school of St. Albans. He worked one 
summer in a saw-mill on the Penobscot River, 
and in 1 S 5 1 , when lie was nineteen years ol 
age, he went to Campello, Mass., where he 
was employed in a shoe factory until 1858. 
During the two years following he worked in 
shoe factories in Gorham, Farmington, and 
Rochester, Me., and then entered the employ 
oi Saunderson Brothers, bakers, of Cambridge, 
Mass., as driver of a team. In i860 he took 
charge of the manufacturing department ol 
Libby i\: Walker, boot and shoe manufacturers 
of Little Palls, Gorham; and at the first call 
loi troops to defend the Union he resigned his 
position and signified his readiness to serve. 
He enlisted April 27, 1 861, under Josiah 



Ileald in Company A, Fifth Maine Regiment, 
Sixth Corps, Second Brigade, First Division, 
and was mustered into the United States ser- 
vice as First Sergeant of the company. He 
served with distinguished bravery in some of 
the most momentous engagements of the war, 
including the first battle of Bull Run, West 
Point, Antictam, Fredericksburg, Salem 
Heights, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Rappa- 
hannock Station, Spottsylvania Court house, 
Cold Harbor (where his brother < Ibed was 
killed), the second battle of Bull Run, the 
second engagement at Fredericksburg, and 
Gaines's Mill. At the battle of Rappahan- 
nock, November 7, 1863, he received a shell 
wound in the right side; and at Cold Harbor, 
June 4, 1864, he was wounded in the left 
forearm by a shell. He received his dis- 
charge July 27, 1864, and returned home, 
suffering from his wound and broken in health, 
but loaded with honors. He was commis- 
sioned Second Lieutenant, July 12, [86i ; 
Captain, August 14 of the same year; Major, 
September 24, 1862; and Lieutenant Colonel, 
January 8, 1863. 

Colonel Millett was not able to work until 
the winter of 1865. He then entered the 
insurance business, which he has successfully 
followed up to the present time, representing 
now the /Etna and Home Companies, the 
Phoenix and Hartford of Hartford, Conn., the 
Insurance Company of North America, the 
Phoenix of New York, and the Quincy of 
Massachusetts (all fire insurance companies), 
and the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance 
Company. 

Colonel Millett is a Republican in politics. 
1 le was chosen Collector of Gorham in 1874, 
and served two years. He was appointed Post- 
master in 1 88 1, during Arthur's administra- 
tion, and reappointed by Harrison in July, 
[889, remaining in office till July, 1893. He 
represented the town in 1894 in the legislature, 
and has been Chairman of the Republican 
Town Committee for twenty years. lie is a 
member and Past Commander of John R. 
Adams Post, No. IOI, of Gorham, of which 
he has been Quartermaster and Adjutant and 
is Past Assistant Inspector general lie is 
Treasurer of Harmony Lodge, No. 38, A. F. 
& A. M., of Gorham, of which he was Master 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



163 



four years, and is now Past High Priest of 
Eagle Chapter, No. 11, of the Royal Arch. 
He is also a member of the Council of Royal 
and Select Masters of Portland and of Portland 
Commandery, Knights of Templars, No. 2, 
and has held office as Senior Grand Deacon in 
the Grand Lodge ol Maine and served as Grand 
Marshal. He belongs to the military order 
known as the Loyal Legion of the United 
States, being a member of the Commander)' of 
the State of Maine, and is Worthy Patron of 
the Pine Tree Chapter, No. 27, of the Order 
Eastern Star. 

Colonel Millett was married December 29, 
[870, to M. Antoinette, only daughter of Free- 
man Whitney, of Portland. She was born in 
Pittsfield, NIL ; but the greater part of her 
childhood and youth was passed in Portland. 
She is a lady of rare charm of manner and of 
much intellectual ability and force of character, 
and is very prominent in social circles, taking 
an especial interest in Grand Army matters. 
She is a member of Pine Tree Chapter, No. 
27, of the Eastern Star, and of the Woman's 
Relief Corps, Department of Maine. In iSSS 
she was elected President of the John R. 
Adams Relief Corps, Department of Maine, and 
in [889 she was re-elected. She has served as 
Department Aid several terms; was a delegate 
to the National Convention in Detroit in 1891, 
and was on the Executive Board in 1894; was 
unanimously elected Department President at 
the Convention in February, 1S95, and is pres- 
ent Aid on the national President's staff. She 
is also a member of the "Home Board," which 
devises ways and means for the support of the 
inmates of the Maine Relief Corps Home, 
which has not yet received government aid. 
Mis. Millett joined the Baptist church when 
she was seventeen years of age, and is now a 
member of the Second Church of that denomi- 
nation in Portland. Colonel Millett and his 
wife attend the Congregationalist church. 



'RANK W. BUCKNAM, a prominent 
and promising young business man of 
Yarmouth, was born in this town, De- 
cember 7, 1869, coming from an old and 
worthy family. His great - grandparents, 
Samuel and Phoebe (Chandler) Bucknam, were 



pioneers of North Yarmouth, where their six- 
children were born, Captain William Buck- 
nam, the grandfather of Frank W., being the 
eldest child. 

William Bucknam was born on December 
22, 1806. He was almost brought up on the 
sea, when but a lad making various trips with 
his father, becoming so- familiar with every- 
thing pertaining to a sailor's life that at an 
early age he was made master of a vessel, a 
position which he filled for many years. He 
married one of Yarmouth's fair daughters, 
Miss Elizabeth True, their nuptials being- 
celebrated February 19, 1835. After this 
auspicious event the sea had no charms to 
draw him from his fireside. He bought a 
farm in Yarmouth, where he lived until his 
demise, July 12, 1851, while yet in the prime 
of manhood. A man of exemplary Christian 
character, he was a valued member of the 
Baptist church. He and his wife had five 
children, namely: Horace, born June 2, 1836; 
Alvan F., born November 27, 1837, who was 
graduated from Bowdoin College in i860, and 
is now a practising physician in Warren, 111. ; 
Lizzie T., born August 3, 1840, died Novem- 
ber 10, 1858; William E., father of the 
special subject of this biographical sketch. 
born February 17, 1844; and Mary Ellen, 
born March 1, 1846. 

William Edward Bucknam succeeded to the 
ownership of the parental estate, and is liv- 
ing on the farm where his birth occurred a 
half-century or more ago. An energetic and 
progressive agriculturist, he owns one of the 
best-managed an 1 most productive farms in 
the town of Yarmouth, his land being located 
not far from the shore. During the late Civil 
War he volunteered in his country's service, 
going to the front September 17, 1862, as a 
Corporal in Company G, Twenty-fifth Maine 
Volunteer Infantry, and being honorably dis- 
charged at the expiration of his term of enlist- 
ment in 1863. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Katie Mahoney, was born July 4, 1849, in 
this town, daughter of Cornelius and Ellen 
(Kelley) Mahoney, neither of whom is now 
living. Mr. and Mrs. William E. Bucknam 
have three children, as follows: Frank W. : 
Jennie Q., born July 8, 1873, who was gradu- 
ated from the Normal School of Bridgewater, 



I 04 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mass., and is now engaged in teaching; and 
Maud, born January 29, 1879. The parents 
are both faithful members of the Congrega- 
tional church. Politically, the father is a 
stanch Republican; and, socially, he is a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic 
and a Knight of Pythias. 

Frank W. Bucknam acquired his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of Yarmouth, after 
which he took a course of study at Shaw's 
Business College in Portland. lie remained 
on the ancestral homestead until about twenty- 
one years old, when he secured a position in 
the drug store of Mr. Cook at Yarmouthville, 
where he remained three years, paying close 
attention to the details of his work. -Going 
to Portland, in order to perfect himself in the 
business to which he has since been devoted, 
Mr. Bucknam became a clerk in the drug store 
of Edward L. Boss, and at the end of a year 
passed his examination in pharmacy, his di- 
ploma bearing the date of February 14, 1894, 
a most acceptable valentine. A month later, 
on March 19, he purchased the stock of M. C. 
Merrill, at the stand where he is now engaged 
in a successful business, dealing in drugs, 
paints, oils, and various other commodities, 
including window glass and wall paper. 

Mr. Bucknam is energetic and enterprising, 
courteous and accommodating to his patrons, 
and well merits his prosperous trade. In poli- 
tics he is an active Republican, being at the 
present time Town Clerk. Socially, he is a 
Mason, belonging to Casco Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M. He is faithful to the religious be- 
liefs in which he was reared, being a Congre- 
gationalism though not a member of any 
church. 



-OSEPH H. HUTCHINS, a prominent 
contractor of the city of Deering, was 
born in Buxton, Me., October 8, 1S43. 
His parents were Solomon L. and 
Phebe R. (Matthews) Hutchins, the former a 
native of Pownal, Cumberland County, Me. 

Solomon L. Hutchins was born in 181 7, 
and received his early education in the schools 
of his native town. Mastering the carpenter's 
trade, he worked for some years in Portland 
as a journeyman, and then, removing to Bux- 



ton, went into business as a contractor and 
builder, employing a large number of men. 
In 1865 he removed to Deering, but four years 
later returned to Pownal, where he purchased 
a farm. There he spent the last twelve years 
of his life, profitably engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. lie died in 1880. In 1841 he was 
married to Phebe R., daughter of Joseph 
Matthews, a farmer of Scarboro, Me. Three 
children were born to them, namely: two 
daughters who died in early womanhood, one 
at the age of sixteen, the other nineteen ; and a 
son, the subject of this sketch. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hutchins were active and devoted members of 
the church. 

Joseph H. Hutchins attended the common 
schools of Camden, and finished his course of 
study at Yarmouth Academy. He learned the 
carpenter's trade of his father, and when 
twenty-two years of age entered the employ of 
A. D. Smith, builder, of Portland, for whom 
he worked about fifteen years. While in Mr. 
Smith's employ he superintended the build- 
ing of the Farrington and Storer Blocks, and 
many other large buildings in Portland, Deer- 
ing, and Westbrook. In 1880 he went into 
business for himself; and he has since been 
successfully engaged as a contractor and 
builder, his extensive experience, honest deal- 
ing, and prompt execution winning for him a 
large and reliable patronage. Mr. Hutchins 
is recognized as one of the leading builders of 
the locality, and is now serving his second 
term as Vice-President of the Deering Build- 
ing Loan Association. 

On November 11, 1864, Mr. Hutchins was 
married to Julia A., daughter of Emery Ileal, 
a farmer of Lincolnville, Me. Three chil- 
dren blessed their union, two of whom are liv- 
ing — Mary E. and Frank L. The former is 
the wife of Edward M. Cobb, a contractor and 
builder of Deering. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Hutchins 
served on the Deering Town Committee for 
about eight years, and was elected to the 
Board of Aldermen in 1892, having the honor 
to be the first Chairman of that body. He 
was elected Assessor of Deering in [894 for 
three years. He is a member of several prom- 
inent social organizations, belonging to Maine 
Lodge, No. 1, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'65 



lows, of Portland, of which he has been Vice- 
Grand; and Eastern Star Encampment; Ivy 
Lodge, No. 5, Daughters of Rebecca; Long- 
fellow Lodge, No. 43, Knights of Pythias, in 
which he has held all the offices, also repre- 
senting the Lodge in the Grand Lodge: and 
the Maine Charitable Mechanic Association. 
With his wife and family he attends the Con- 
gregational church, contributing liberally 
Inward its support. 



(Efr-OIIN CALVIN STEVENS, a. promi- 
nent architect of Portland, Me., was 
born in Boston, Mass., Octobers, 1855, 
son of Leander and Maria J. II. (Win- 
gate) Stevens. Me is of pioneer ancestry and 
of Revolutionary stock, his great-grandfather, 
Jotham Stevens, who was a soldier of the Rev- 
olution, having been born and bred in England. 
When a young man he came to this State, lo- 
cating in the town of Kennebunk, which was 
then almost a wilderness. He cleared a tract 
of land, on which he engaged in farming and 
lumbering, living there until his death, which 
was caused by an accident while he was yoking 
oxen to go to the woods for a load of lumber, 
he being then ninety-eight years of age, but 
remarkably hale and hearty. 

Mr. Stevens's grandfather, Calvin Stevens, 
son of the above-mentioned Jotham, was 
reared to mature years in Kennebunk. He 
subsequently learned the cabinet-maker's 
trade in Concord, N.H., but established him- 
self permanently in business at Standish, 
where he resided until his demise in March, 
1877, at the age of eighty-four years. He 
married Lydia Monitor), daughter of Captain 
Jonathan Moulton. She passed to the higher 
life in 1856, leaving three children, one being 
Leander, the father of John Calvin. 

Leander Stevens, whose birth occurred 
Match 8, 1 822, in Standish, learned the trade 
of a cabinet-maker, as well as that of fancy 
carriage and house painter. He spent his 
boyhood days on the parental homestead, 
about two miles from the village of Standish; 
and this property is now in his possession. 
Desiring to enter upon a mercantile career, 
lie went to Boston when a young man and was 
there employed as clerk in a grocery store for 



three years, after which he spent two years 
similarly employed in a hardware store in New 
York City. Returning then to Boston, he 
opened a hotel, which he successfully managed 

for three years. His next venture was in 

flection with Mr. Poland, they forming a part- 
nership under the name of Poland & Stevens, 
and selling groceries for the following three 
years, when the partnership was dissolved. 
Mr. Stevens was engaged as messenger toi 
the British American Express Company lor 
the next six years, running from Portland 
to Montreal, via the Grand Trunk Rail- 
way. On July 12, 1861, he took charge of the 
office of the Preble House in this city, resign 
ing the position in 1871 to take charge of the 
Falmouth Hotel, then the largest hotel in the 
State, continuing until it was closed in 1875. 
During the year 1876 he had control of the 
Poland Springs House office, being afterward 
head clerk at the American House, Boston, for 
twelve years. Going again to Poland Springs, 
he had charge of that hotel for two years, when 
he retired from active pursuits. He married 
Maria Jane Hancock Wingate, daughter of 
John Wingate, their nuptials being celebrated 
in November, 184S. Four children were 
born to them, namely: Leander L., who lives 
on the old homestead; John Calvin; Lydia 
Maria, wife of S. E. Winslow, of New York 
City; and Henry Wingate, who is in the office 
with his brother, John C. 

John Calvin Stevens was but a year and a 
half old when his parents removed to this city, 
where he was educated, being graduated from 
the high school in 1873. Having artistic taste 
and mechanical ability, which he was desirous 
of putting to practical use, he entered the 
office of F. H. Fassett in the fall of 1873, 
remaining with him as an assistant until 1880, 
when he was taken into partnership, the firm 
name being Fassett & Stevens. Having estab- 
lished a reputation as one of the leading archi- 
tects of this vicinity, Mr. Stevens decided to 
try his fortune elsewhere. Going to Boston, 
he opened a branch office there, remaining .1 
year and a half, and in that time built Hotel 
Pemberton at Windmill Point. Hull. In 
1883 the partnership of Fassett & Stevens was 
dissolved, Mr. Stevens opening an office for 
himself in the First National Bank Building, 



[66 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



he being the first tenant, and continuing alone 
until 1887, when he entered into a copartner- 
ship with Albert VV. Cobb, the firm carrying 
mi a substantial business fur eighteen months, 
under the name of Stevens & Cobb. Mr. 
Stevens has built many of the finest residences 
in this and neighboring cities, as well as some 
of the most prominent public buildings of the 
State, including the Physical Laboratory at 
Colby University, the Kicker Classical School 
at Houlton, the new buildings at Hebron 
Academy, and the Maine Eye and Ear Infirm- 
ary at Portland. He also erected the Oxford 
Building, where he has had his office for the 
past seven years. Among the beautiful 
private residences built by Mr. Stevens is that 
of the Hon. F. E. Richards; and he is now at 
work on the Biddeford City Hall and the new 
Insane Hospital at Bangor, and supervising 
the erection of some very handsome residences. 
In his office he gives constant employment to 
six competent draughtsmen, the largest force 
in any similar office in the State. 

In [884 Mr. Stevens was made an honorary 
member of the Architectural League of New 
York, one of the leading organizations of the 
kind in the Union, and three years later was 
made a Fellow of the American Institute of 
Architects. He belongs to many of the local 
social societies, having been one of the half- 
dozen men to organize the Portland Athletic 
Club, of which he has since been one of the 
Executive Committee, also being President of 
the Poll land Society of Art and one of its 
Executive Committee since 1 88 1. In 1889 he 
was elected President of the Maine Charitable 
Mechanic Association; and in [883 he became 
a member of the League of American Wheel- 
men, which has a membership in Maine of four 
hundred and thirty-two persons. He is promi- 
nent in cycling circles, being President of the 
Wheel Club; and he is a member of the Maine 
Lodge of Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
besides belonging to the Ancient Landmark 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., Mount Vernon Chap- 
In, the Portland Council, Portland Command- 
ery, Knights of Templars, and having taken 
all the degrees up to and including the thirty- 
second degree. 

On December 24, 18//, Mr. Stevens was 
milled in marriage with Martha Louise Wal- 



dron, daughter of Howard D. Waldron, of this 
city. Their residence, pleasantly located at 
52 Bowdoin Street, is made cheerful and home- 
like by the presence of their four children - 
John Howard, Caroline Maria, Margaret Lou- 
ise, and Dorothy Wingate. 




ASSIUS L. KIMBALL, a thriving 
and intelligent farmer oi Bridgton, is 
a native of this town, his birth 
having occurred February 7, 1847, 
on the farm where he now resides, His grand- 
father, Jediah Kimball, Sr. , who was the origi- 
nal owner of the farm, was a native of Rhode 
Island, from which State he came to Cumber- 
land County, Me., purchasing this property, 
which then consisted of ninety acres of wild 
land, on which not a tree had been cut. He 
built a log cabin in typical pioneer style, 
cleared a large portion of the land, and resided 
here until his death, which occurred when he 
had attained the age of seventy-five years. 
His son, Jediah Kimball, Jr., was reared to 
farming, in which honorable occupation he was 
engaged during most of his life, although he 
occasionally worked at the painter's trade. 
After the death of his father he came into 
possession of the homestead, which he man- 
aged successfully until his own death, which 
occurred at the age of forty-eight years. He 
married Miss Mary Kitson, who bore him two 
children — Cassius L. , whose name prefaces 
this sketch; and Florence, wife of Charles E. 
Dawes, who likewise resides on the homestead. 
The mother lived a widow many years, d\ing 
in 1888, when seventy-one years old, and was 
then laid to rest beside her husband in the 
Lower Ridge Cemetery. 

Cassius L. Kimball received a common- 
school education, completing his studies at the 
age of fifteen years, being called upon at th.it 
early age to assume the charge ol the home 
farm, which has since been under his control. 
The land is fertile and well adapted to the 
growth of cereals and the fruits common to 
New England, and his management of the 
property lias been accompanied by gratifying 
lesults. Mr. Kimball has never taken any 
active part in political affairs, but gives his 
hearty support to the Democratic party. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



167 




ILLIAM ROBERTS, an extensive 
farmer of Westbrook, Me., a com- 
rade of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public, was born at the Roberts homestead, 
in this town, March 29, [ N 4 3 , son of Charles 
and Eleanor J. (Chenery) Roberts, and was 
named for his paternal grandfather. Ances- 
tors of the Roberts family came to Maine from 
Gloucester, Mass. 

William Roberts, the elder, was born at 
Cape Elizabeth, from which place his parents 
moved to Gorham ; and he resided there until 
he was twenty-one years old. He then came 
to Westbrook, where he bought the property 
which is now occupied by his grandson, and 
engaged in farming during the rest of his life, 
lie was also a prominent contractor, a business 
which he conducted in company with his son, 
Charles; and several important highways in that 
section were built under his direction. He 
was a Democrat in politics, and served as a 
member of the Board of Selectmen three years, 
1839, 1840, and 1 84 1. He was twice married; 
and by his first wife, who was before her mar- 
riage Betsy Hatch, and was a daughter of the 
Rev. Nathaniel Hatch, of Falmouth, he had 
three children. His second wife was Dorcas 
Johnson, daughter of John Johnson, of Fal- 
mouth, and by this union there was one 
daughter. Of his four children, the latest 
survivor was Charles, Mr. Roberts's father, 
who was a son of his first wife. 

Charles Roberts was born on January 20, 
1804, in the house which adjoins his son's 
present residence; and he always resided upon 
this farm. In early manhood he engaged with 
his father in contracting for the construction 
of highways and other public works. He 
built sections of the road between Portland 
and Woodford's Corner, that between Stroud- 
water and Coalkilm, the new road leading from 
Duck Pond to Pride's Corner; and he also 
assisted in the construction of the first bridge 
at Cumberland Mills. He possessed a strong 
constitution, and was remarkably vigorous and 
active until ninety-one years old, but after 
that his strength failed. He died on March 
1 8, 1896, in his ninety-third year, retaining 
his senses till within a few hours of his death. 
In politics he was early a Democrat, but later 
supported the principles of the Republican 



party; and he was twice nominated for the 
Hoard of Selectmen during the days of the old 
town government. In religious belief he was 
a Congregational ist. lie married on May C>, 
1832, Eleanor J. Chenery, who was bom on 
April 26, 1 8 10, and has now nearly completed 
her eighty-sixth year. She has been an ex- 
cellent wife and mother. Her parents were 
Joseph and Rebecca (Johnson) Chenery, whose 
home was in that part of Falmouth which is 
now I leering, her father having come there 
from Watertown, Mass. Mrs. Chenery was a 
daughter of John and Eleanor (Lamb) Johnson, 
the former of whom lived to be ninety-six 
years old, and the latter about fourscore. Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Roberts were the parents oi 
seven children, of whom four are living, 
namely: Frances !•]., wife of Randall J. Elder, 
of East Boston ; John, who resides in West- 
brook ; William, the subject of this sketch; 
and Charles, a resident of Harrison, Me. 

William Roberts attended the public schools 
of Westbrook in his boyhood, and completed 
his studies at a commercial college in Portland. 
He enlisted as a private in Company E, 
Twenty-fifth Regiment, Maine Volunteers, 
under Colonel Francis Fesscnden, and was 
stationed in Washington in defence of the 
capital for six months. The regiment was 
then ordered to duty at Chant illy, where it 
remained for a time, and thence went back to 
Washington, where its term of service expired; 
and Mr. Roberts was mustered out in Portland, 
July 10, 1863. He then returned to the home- 
stead, where he remained until 1869, when 
he spent six months in the West. Later he- 
took another trip in the same direction, ex- 
tending through a period of one year, since 
which time he has devoted his attention to the 
cultivation of the farm. The property, which 
consists of about three hundred acres, is desira- 
bly located and well improved, sixty acres 
being set apart for the raising of hay, the an- 
nual production of which amounts to fifty tons. 

Mr. Roberts was married on May 19, 1886, 
to Ellen A. Knight, daughter of Joseph 
Knight, of Falmouth, and has one daughter 
— Eleanor C, aged seven years. 

In politics he is a Republican, and is 
actively interested in local affairs, having 
served as Overseer of the Poor in 1891, the 



1 68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



first year under the city charter; and he was 
elected a member of the Board of Assessors for 
the years 1895-96. He is a comrade of Cloud- 
man Post, No. 100, Grand Army of the Re- 
public, of Westbrook. An able, industrious, 
and successful farmer and a progressive, lib- 
eral-minded citizen, he enjoys the esteem and 
good will of the entire community. He at- 
tends the Congregational church. 



LISHA S. STOVER, Town Clerk of 
Ilarpswell, Me., who has held his 
present office twenty-six years, was 
burn in the house whose roof still shelters 
him on June 4, 1828. He is a son of Simeon 
and Lois (Hinckley) Stover, and a represent- 
ative of one of the oldest families of the town, 
his great-great-grandfather, John Stover, who 
was born in York, Me., in 1709, settling in 
Ilarpswell in 1770, and dying there in 1786. 
His great-grandfather, Alcott Stover, was born 
in Ilarpswell and there spent his life, engaged 
in farming; and his son Elisha, the grand- 
lather of our subject, also a native of Harps- 
well and a farmer, lived for many years on 
Goose Island. In 1 82 1 Elisha Stover pur- 
chased the farm now owned by his grandson 
and namesake, and here spent the rest of his 
life, dying at the age of eighty years. 

Simeon Stover, father of our subject, was 
reared on the farm on Goose Island, and re- 
moved to Ilarpswell with his father. He 
devoted his life to agriculture, tilling the 
broad acres of the homestead with profitable 
results. He was called to rest at the age of 
sixty-five years. His wife, who was a native 
of Lisbon, Me., daughter of Lemuel Hinckley, 
a prosperous farmer of that town, lived to the 
advanced age of eighty-two, spending her 
last days with her son Elisha S. She was an 
esteemed member of the Baptist church. 
Seven children completed the home circle of 
Mr. and Mrs. Stover, five of whom are living 
— Lemuel; Elisha S. ; Minerva Ann, wife of 
< His Vining, of Durham; Harriet, wife of 
Edmund Wilson, of Harpswell ; and Elizabeth 
Jane, wife of Reed O. Johnson, of Orr's Island. 

Elisha S. Stover attended the common 
schools and academy of Harpswell, and after 
finishing his course as a pupil presided at the 



teacher's desk for three terms. He then 
worked in the shipyard of the town ten years, 
from 1849 to 1859, and when he was thirty- 
two years of age turned to the ploughshare, 
which had been the source of his forefathers' 
prosperity. After his father's death he took 
full charge of the home farm, and now lias 
a fine property of fifty-five acres in a high 
state of cultivation. A Democrat in politics, 
Mr. Stover has been Town Clerk of Harpswell 
twenty-six years, having been elected twenty- 
five times and appointed once to fill a vacancy. 
This remarkable record is unimpeachable evi- 
dence of his efficiency, and also of the high 
esteem in which he is held by his townsmen. 
In 1872 Mr. Stover was married to Cordelia 
R. Bishop, daughter of Captain John Bishop, 
of Ilarpswell, a hardy mariner who attained 
the advanced age of ninety-three years. They 
have no children. Mrs. Stover is a member 
of the Congregational Church of Harpswell; 
and she and her husband are persons of culti- 
vated literary taste, familiar with the standard 
English authors. 



K'. NATHAN CLEAVES was bom 
n Bridgton, Me., January 9, 1835, 
son of Thomas and Sophia (Brad- 
street) Cleaves. His boyhood days 
were spent at Bridgton and in Portland. He 
fitted for college at the Portland Academy, 
and entered Bowdoin in 1854, graduating in 
1858. Among his classmates were General 
Francis Fessenden, of Portland; General J. P. 
Cilley, of Rockland; the Hon. E. B. Nealley, 
of Bangor; General Ellis Spear, of Washing- 
ton, D.C. ; and the Rev. Frank Sewall. 

Selecting the law as his profession, Mr. 
Cleaves studied with the Hon. Joseph Howard 
and the Hon. Sewall C. Strout, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Cumberland County at 
the April term, 1861, of the Supreme Judicial 
Court. He opened an office in Bowdoinham, 
Me., and subsequently removed to Portland, 
forming a law partnership with the Hon. L. D. 
M. Sweat, then a member of Congress from 
the Portland district. This relation contin- 
ued until July, 1864, when he formed a part- 
nership with the late Hon. Joseph Howard, 
under the firm name of Howard & Cleaves. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



169 



This partnership continued until the decease 
11I Judge Howard, when the law firm of Nathan 
and Henry B. Cleaves was formed, to which 
firm subsequently Stephen C. Perry was ad- 
mitted as a member. 

In politics Nathan Cleaves was a Democrat, 
loyal to his party, but "he subordinated his 
political conduct to his manhood." He was a 
man of very great personal popularity, and 
was many times honored with public office, 
being City Solicitor of Portland in 1869, Rep- 
resentative to the State legislature in 1871 
and in 1875, Judge of the Probate Court from 
1876 to 1880, surveyor of the port of Portland 
for four years ; and he was frequently a dele- 
gate to conventions, both State and national. 
At the State convention of the Democratic 
party in 1S92 he was unanimously selected as 
a delegate at large to the Chicago convention 
that nominated Cleveland and Stephenson, 
being Chairman of the Maine delegation. 

Judge Cleaves was connected with very 
many business enterprises and corporations. 
He was President of the Ellsworth Water 
Company, a Director in the Cumberland Na- 
tional Bank of Portland, in the First National 
Bank of Bar Harbor, the Westbrook Trust 
Company, and other leading business and 
financial corporations of the State. He was a 
prominent member of the Masonic fraternity 
and of the Odd Fellows, President of the So- 
ciety for the Prevention of Cruelty to Ani- 
mals, and a member and officer of many char- 
itable organizations, the treasuries of which 
have many times felt the benefit of his quiet 
but effective generosity. He was a faithful 
and devoted member of St. Luke's Parish, and 
for many years one of its Vestrymen. Judge 
Cleaves was in active practice for a period of 
more than thirty years. He attained great 
prominence in the profession he loved so much, 
and always enjoyed the confidence, respect, 
and esteem of the bench and bar, and of the 
entire community. 

Nathan Cleaves married in May, 1865, 
Caroline, the accomplished daughter of Judge 
Howard. Mrs. Cleaves died at Augusta in 
February, 1875, while her husband was there 
as a Representative to the legislature from 
Portland. 

Judge Cleaves died at his residence in this 



city on September 5, 1892. Memorial exer- 
cises were held by the Cumberland Par Asso- 
ciation before the Supreme Judicial Court, 
and the following appropriate resolution was 
adopted and placed on the records of the 
court : — 

"Resolved, That the members of the Cum- 
berland bar have heard with a deep sense of 
personal grief and loss the news of the sudden 
illness and death of their distinguished asso- 
ciate member, the lion. Nathan Cleaves, at 
the very summit of his professional career; 
that his contemporaries at the bar during their 
lives will cherish the memory of his unvary- 
ing courtesy, his dignity of professional bear- 
ing and demeanor, his pure life and character, 
his eminent legal attainments, his fine train- 
ing and capacity in all matters pertaining to 
his profession, his exceptionally good forensic 
judgment, tact, and skill, anil the rare and 
excellent traits and qualities of his mind and 
heart; and, cherishing this memory of him 
ourselves, we write also this brief memorial 
of him, that they who come after us in the 
profession, to a late posterity, may remember 
him as one of the models and ornaments of 
his own times." 

In speaking of Judge Cleaves a distin- 
guished member of the bar says: "It is seldom 
that the bar has been so affected as by the 
death of Nathan Cleaves. For a long time he 
had been one with us, one of us. He was 
standing by our side, in our very midst: we 
looked up, and he was gone. The good man, 
whose life had become knit with ours by long 
memories and all fond associations, at the 
meridian of his intellectual faculties, in the 
robes of his profession, and in the midst of its 
heaviest responsibilities and obligations, lay 
dead at his post. He who labored without 
rest to bring the best fruitage of life to its 
harvest had fallen in his place when the 
boughs hung heaviest, when his work needed 
him most — had paused, and was still amid 
the ripe wealth of autumn. The sickle still 
gleamed in the harvest field, fallen from the 
reaper's hand. In the sunlight rustled still 
the ripened and ripening grain, which no hand 
now shall ever gather into sheaves. All was 
as it had been, but his work was done. All 
was as before, but another companionship, 



tyo 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKVV 



prized and held dear, the charm of one friend- 
ship more, had disappeared from our lives." 

The words of eulogy bestowed upon the life 
ami character of the Hon. Nathan Cleaves by 
the court and his brethren at the bar were a 
just and merited tribute to an honorable and 
noble life. The funeral services were held at 
St. Luke's Cathedral, where Judge Cleaves 
had been a constant attendant tor many years, 
and were most impressive. 



ISAAC SKILLIN DUNN, who died at 
his home in North Yarmouth, January 
17, 1885, was a native of this town, 
born July 6, 1S22, son of James and 
Lucy (Skillin) Dunn. His father was an 
early settler in the locality, and was for many 
years successfully engaged in farming, butcher- 
ing, and conducting mercantile business. He 
occupied a prominent position among his fel- 
low-citizens. His religious opinions were 
liberal, and in politics he supported the Whig 
party. He owned a good farm, which he cul- 
tivated energetically, and upon which he spent 
his last years, dying at the age of fifty-nine. 
His wife Lucy lived to the age of seventy-two. 
Their family consisted of eight children; 
namely, Samuel, James, William, Cyrus, 
Isaac, Mary (all deceased), Lydia E. (now 
Mrs. Chase), and Miss Sarah T. Dunn, the 
two last named being residents of Portland. 

Isaac Skillin Dunn was educated in the 
schools of his native town, completing his 
studies at the Westbrook Seminary. In early 
manhood he engaged in mercantile pursuits, 
in company with his brothers, the firm being 
known as I. S. Dunn & Co. ; and he had a suc- 
cessful business career of thirty-three years. 
He was a prominent leader in local affairs, 
being a stanch supporter of the Republican 
party, and capably serving his town as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Selectmen, besides holding 
other town offices. Large-brained and gener- 
ous-hearted, with broad views upon religion 
and other vital subjects, he long wielded a 
powerful influence among his fellow-towns- 
men, his unswerving business honesty and 
personal integrity commanding the respect 
and esteem of all who knew him. The clos- 
ing years of his life were spent in the midst 



of his family, whose future welfare and pros 
perity he had labored diligently to insure; and 
his death was the cause of widespread sorrow 
and sincere regret. He was married January 
20, 1859, to Miss Maria M. Loring, who was 
born in Falmouth, September 26, 1836, a 
daughter of Captain Charles and Dorcas Lor- 
ing, her father being an early settler and a 
highly respected resident of North Yarmouth. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dunn had three sons, namely : 
William T., who was born September 7, 1863, 
and is now studying law in Portland; Ansel 
Loring, born July 1, 1865, who is now a suc- 
cessful merchant of North Yarmouth ; and 
Charles Loring, who was born August 7, 1873, 
and resides on the old homestead. Mrs. Dunn 
died February 8, 1896, at the age of fifty-nine 
years. She was a devoted wife, and a kind, 
affectionate mother; and her death was an irrep- 
arable loss to her family and the community. 

The Dunn family is an old and prominent 
one in North Yarmouth, its members having 
long been known as able, successful business 
men; and Ansel L. Dunn, who conducts the 
business formerly carried on by his father, is 
a representative of the third generation to 
engage in mercantile pursuits in this town. 
He is a young man of good business ability 
and a worthy successor to his father, being 
closely identified with the public affairs of the 
town as First Selectman, and is also Assistant 
Postmaster. He married Miss Maria O. Law- 
rence, a daughter of J. N. S. Lawrence (now 
deceased), who was a prominent resident of 
Pownal, Me. He and his wife occupy a 
pleasant home in East North Yarmouth, where 
his business is located. 




RTHUR H. BENOIT, an enterprising 

dealer in clothing and gentlemen's 
furnishing goods, of Westbrook, 
Me., was born in St. Dominique, 
P.Q., May 12, 1865, son of Charles and Amelic 
(Clement) Benoit. His immediate ancestors 
were natives of Canada; and his father was 
born in St. John Baptist de Ranville, April 28. 
1828, being one of a family of eight children. 
Charles Benoit learned the trade of a black- 
smith, which he followed in St. Dominique 
and Biddeford, Me., until some years ago, 



I'.IOCRAPHICAL REVIKW 



7' 



when he returned to St. Dominique, where he 
is now engaged in carrying on a farm. His 
wife, Amelie Clement, who is also a native 
of Canada, was born in St. Andre des Equart, 
( Intario, August 14, 1S32. She has been the 
mother of nine children, six of whom are liv- 
ing, namely: Albert, who resides in Corn- 
wall, Province of Ontario; Clement, a resi- 
dent of St. Hyacinthe, P.O.; Arthur II., the 
subject of this sketch; Maria; Charles A., 
who is employed by his brother Arthur; and 
Annie, who resides with her parents. 

Mr. Benoit's grandfather on his father's side 
was Toussaint Bcnoit, and his grandmother 
on the same side was Rosalie Laperche dit 
Sabourin. On his mother's side Mr. Benoit's 
grandfather was John Clement, who was born 
at La Pointe Claire; and his grandmother, 
Tasette Lefebre, born at Vaudreuil. His 
uncles on his father's side of the family are 
Toussaint, Venaut, and Julien; his aunts, 
Dcsauges, Henriette, Catherine, and Rosalie. 
Mis uncles on his mother's side are Edward, 
Oliver, Alexander, and Francis; his aunts, 
I'hilamene and Julie. 

Arthur H. Benoit commenced his education 
in the schools of St. Dominique, and after 
his removal to Biddeford he pursued a course 
of English studies in the public schools of 
that city. After leaving school he was em- 
ployed at the York Mills in Saco for about 
lour years, and then entered mercantile busi- 
ness as a clerk for C. H. Weffer, a clothing 
dealer of Saco. He continued in that capacity 
for six years, during which time he became 
I ami liar with every detail of the business; 
and about the year 1890 he formed a copartner- 
ship with Mr. Weffer for the purpose of estab- 
lishing a store in Westbrook, which was 
opened under his personal supervision. In 
[893 he purchased Mr. Wcffer's interest in 
the Westbrook store, since which time he has 
conducted trade solely upon his own account, 
having created a thriving business. He also 
opened a branch store in Biddeford, Me., in 
1896. He carries in both stores a varied 
line of ready-made clothing, hats, caps, and 
gentlemen's furnishing goods of every de- 
scription, and is regarded as one of the most 
enterprising and successful young merchants 
of Westbrook. 



In 1890 Mr. Benoit was united in marriage 
to Marie Philamene Anna Brodeur, born Feb 
ruary 28, 1868, daughter of Samuel and Emma 
Cussou Brodeur, of Montreal. Mr. and Mrs. 
Benoit have three children, namely: Henry, 
born December 16, 1891; Romeo, born June 
-7> 1893; and Robert, born September 25, 
1895. In all matters relating to the general 
welfare of the community Mr. Benoit takes 
a deep interest; and, although not active in 
public affairs, he evinces a desire for a pro- 
gressive administration of the municipal gov- 
ernment. He is a member of Court City of 
Westbrook, No. 8140, Ancient Order of For- 
esters, of which he has been a Trustee; and 
he attends the Roman Catholic church. 



OHN MORRISON, a resident of Bridg- 
ton for a quarter of a century, is closely 
identified with the agricultural inter- 
ests of this part of Cumberland Count) 1 , 
being the owner of a good and well-appointed 
farm. A native of this town, he was born 
June 26, 1827, being a son of William Morri- 
son, Jr. His grandfather, William Morrison, 
Sr., was born in Gilmantown, N.H., and re- 
moved thence to Cumberland County, Me., in 
1795, being among the pioneer settlers of 
Bridgton. He was twice married, and reared, 
by the two wives, a family of fourteen chil- 
dren. 

William Morrison, Jr., father of John, was 
a farmer throughout the active period of his 
life. He moved from Bridgton to the town 
of Sweden in 1835, and there purchased a 
tract of unimproved land. Ere long the ring- 
ing blows of his axe were heard as he felled 
the trees which were to be used in building 
the log cabin in which he and his family were 
to live. He cleared a good-sized farm, on 
which he carried on mixed husbandry and 
lumbering until his demise in 1849. While 
living in Bridgton, he married Miss Balinda 
Ingalls, who survived him many years, dying 
in 1885. They had a large family of children, 
of whom the following is recorded: William 
A. lived until sixty-six years of age; Joanna 
died at the age of sixty-two; John is the sub- 
ject of this biographical sketch; Charles G. is 
engaged in farming in Bridgton; Lucy J.; 



I 7 2 



P.IOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Sarah M. died when fifty-nine years old; 
Reuben resides in this town; Mary P. is the 
wife of Aaron Brigham; and Julia S. married 
Frank A. Libby, a farmer living in Bridgton. 

John Morrison was but eight years of age 
when his parents removed to the town of 
Sweden, where, as soon as old enough, he 
assisted in the pioneer labor of developing a 
farm from the forest. After his father's death 
he assisted in the management of the home- 
stead property for some years. In 1866 he 
removed to Newton, Mass., where he was over- 
see]- of a gang of men, remaining thus em- 
ployed for four years. In 1870 Mr. Morrison 
returned to Bridgton, here purchasing one 
hundred and ten acres of land, which arc in- 
cluded in his present farm. He carries on 
general farming most successfully, and has 
since added other land to his original pur- 
chase, his estate now containing one hundred 
and thirty acres, some of it being heavily 
timbered. In addition to his other work, he 
is an extensive dealer in lumber, this business 
being quite profitable. In politics Mr. Mor- 
rison affiliates with the Democratic party; and, 
socially, he is a member of the Odd Fellows 
Lodge. 

Mr. Morrison was first married in 1850, 
Miss Adelaide Nevers becoming his wife. 
She died in 1 853, leaving one son, Samuel N. 
In 1855 the union of Mr. Morrison with Miss 
Louise B. Nevers was solemnized. Of this 
marriage four children have been born, 
namely: Francella, who died in infancy; 
Granville W. ; John W., a resident of Bridg- 
ton; and Jennie, who married Frederick 
In-alls, and has one child, Gladys L. 




HARLES WILBUT FOSTER, 
M.D., of Deering, who was the first 
physician to settle at Woodford's 
Corner, was born at Unity, Waldo 
County, Me., April 29, 1850, and is a son of 
Thomas Albert and Eliza (McManus) Foster. 
Thomas A. Foster was born at Montville, Me., 
February 20, 1827. When a young man he 
taught school, and was also engaged in farming 
for a while. In 1856 he began to practice 
medicine at Waterville, and two years later 
moved to Portland, where he was in active 



practice until within a few years. He is now 
Medical Director of the Union Mutual Life 
Insurance Company of Portland, and has re- 
tired from other professional work. 

Charles Wilbut Foster was graduated from 
Westbrook Seminary in 1867 and from Colby 
University in 1871. He then entered the 
employ of the Maine Central Railroad, and 
worked as a fireman fifteen months; but, his 
father wishing him to adopt a profession, he 
entered the Portland School for Medical In- 
struction, which prepared students for other 
institutions during the regular school vaca- 
tions. In the winter of 1872-73 he attended 
the Medical School of Maine, at Brunswick, 
in the fall of 1873 studying at the Medical 
College of Detroit, Mich., and then returning 
to Brunswick, taking two full terms at each 
college. He received his diploma from the 
Detroit Medical College, March 4, 1875, ami 
shortly afterward opened an office in Auburn, 
Me., where he remained fifteen months. He 
then removed to Deering, where he began to 
practise December 25, 1876; and during the 
years of his professional work in this town he 
has established a reputation for skill and sym- 
pathetic treatment that is continually adding 
new names to his visiting-list, and has made 
of his old patients lifelong friends. 

July 6, 1876, Dr. Foster was united in mar- 
riage with Esther B. Parker, daughter of 
Nathaniel Parker, of West Buxton, Me. Two 
daughters have brightened their home — Rachel 
Jones and Esther Perley. Dr. Foster is a 
member of the Portland Medical Club, the 
Maine State Medical Association, the Ameri- 
can Academy of Medicine (the most erudite 
medical bod}- in the United States), the 
American Medical Association, and the Maine 
Academy of Medicine and Science. He was 
the third Vice-President of the American 
Academy of Medicine in 1893, and has been 
President of the Portland Club, an important 
medical association. For the past five years 
Dr. Foster has been delegate from the Maine 
State Medical Association to the American 
Medical Association. 

In politics Dr. Foster is Republican. He 
is a member of the Auditing Committee of the 
Deering Building and Loan Association, but 
has little time for other affiliations outside of 




SAMUEL S. FULLER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



'75 



his medical and fraternal interests. He is 
Past Master of Deering Lodge, No. 183, A. F. 
& A. M., and by virtue of his office a repre- 
sentative to the Grand Lodge of the State. 
He is Past Grand of Harmon)- Lodge, No. 19, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows; a past 
officer of Falmouth Encampment, No. 1 1 ; be- 
longs to Grand Canton Ridgely, and is a mem- 
ber of General Whitten's staff. He is Past 
Chancellor of Rocky Hill Lodge, No. 51, and 
a representative to the Grand Lodge, Knights 
of Pythias; was Past Great Chief of Records 
for five years of Cogawesco Tribe of Red Men, 
No. 5, which gave him the honors of Past 
Great Sachem; is Past Master of Deering 
Lodge, No. 17, Ancient Order of United 
Workmen; a member of Grand Lodge, U. O. 
G. C. ; and Past Noble Commander of Wood 
ford's Commandery, No. 235. Dr. Foster has 
a fine residence at the comer of Deering 
Avenue and Pearl Street. 




AMUEL STILLMAN FULLER, 
who is living in Bridgton, Me., re- 
tired from the active pursuits of 
business, was born in the town of 
Sumner, Oxford County, December 17, 1824. 
He comes from an old Colonial family of Eng- 
lish origin, the immigrant progenitor having 
been John Fuller, a native of England, who 
settled in Cambridge, Mass., his home being 
in what is now Newton, about 1644. 

John Fuller reared six sons and two daugh- 
ters; and it is said that twenty-two of his de- 
scendants went into the Revolutionary army 
from Newton, Mass. His third son, Joseph 
Fuller, married in 1680, Lydia, a daughter of 
Edward Jackson, and afterward continued his 
residence in Newton. (See "History of New- 
ton, Mass.," by the late Rev. S. F. Smith, 
D.D.) Captain Jonathan Fuller, son of 
Joseph and Lydia, horn January 7, 1686-7, 
married Sarah, daughter of John Mirick, the 
line being continued through their son Elisha, 
born March 15, 17 19, who in 1750 married 
Esther, daughter of David Richardson, and 
became the father of Aaron Fuller, the grand- 
father of Samuel S., the subject of the pres- 
ent sketch. 

Aaron Fuller removed from Massachusetts 



to what is now Paris, Oxford County, Me., 
in 1786, making the journey across the 
country with teams. He took up timbered 
land, and cleared a farm, on which he lived 
until after the death of his first wife, when he 
removed to Otisfield, where his death occurred 
October 18, 1 84 1 . His first wife, whom he 
married November 20, 1783, was Hannah 
Pond, who was born September 14, 1764, 
daughter of Simeon and Mary Pond. She 
died on January 7, 1836. She had reared 
seven children, one of them a son named 
Artemus Fuller, born October 16, 1784. 

Artemus Fuller carried on general farming 
in the town of Sumner for several years after 
his marriage, going from there to North Paris, 
where he engaged in repairing and selling 
clocks. He subsequently settled in Lowell, 
Mass., where he remained until his death, 
eighteen years later, on April 1, 1863. His 
wife, formerly Irena Shaw, was born October 
16, 1788, in Hebron, Me., and died October 
29, 1848, in Lowell. She was the mother of 
six children; namely, Elvira J., Alonzo F., 
Olive F., Samuel Stillman, Sabrina H., and 
Melvina F. 

Samuel S. Fuller attended the district 
school during the winter seasons, and worked 
on the homestead farm during the summers 
until nineteen years of age, when he went to 
Bethel, where he learned the carriage-maker's 
trade, serving an apprenticeship of two years. 
Going then to Lowell, Mass., he engaged in 
carpentering for a year ; and after that he en- 
tered the Middlesex Mill as a section hand in 
the weaving-room, where he remained three or 
more years. Returning to this State, Mr. 
Fuller was employed for the succeeding three 
years in the Frye Mills at Lewiston, having 
charge of the weaving-room. His next posi- 
tion was that of second hand in the Bay State, 
now the Washington, Mill at Lawrence, Mass. 
In 1857 that mill was closed; and he returned 
once again to Maine, and spent two years on 
the farm of his father-in-law in Madison, at 
the end of that time resuming work in the Bay 
State Mill in Lawrence, having charge of the 
weaving-room the following eighteen months. 
H? afterward occupied a similar position in 
the woollen-mill at Vassalboro, Me., for five 
years, going thence to Lowell, Mass., where 



■ 7 6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



he was given the care of three weaving-rooms 
and the dressing-room. Four years later Mr. 
Fuller was appointed assistant superintendent 
of the woollen department of the Washington 
Mill in Lawrence, and in the course of three 
years was appointed superintendent, having 
the entire charge of the woollen department 
for six months. From 1875 until 1879 he had 
charge of the finishing-rooms of the Pemberton 
Mills in Lawrence, coming from there to 
Bridgton to accept the position of designer for 
the Forest and the Pondicherry Mills, in which 
capacity he was employed until 1890, when he 
retired witli an honorable record for industrial 
achievement, his successive promotions having 
been well earned. 

Mr. Fuller was married July 20, 1850, to 
Miss Elizabeth N. Reed, a daughter of Dean 
and Elizabeth (Norton) Reed. One child 
was born of this union, a daughter, Mary 
Ellen, who died May 17, 1875, aged twenty- 
two years, two months. Mrs. Elizabeth N. 
Fuller was born on February 26, 1824, in the 
town of Madison, Somerset County, and died 
at the age of seventy-one years, May 7, 1895. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fuller united with the Congre- 
gational church at Lawrence, during their 
residence in that city, their membership being 
afterward transferred to the Bridgton Congre- 
gational Church. 




lHARLES L. RANDALL, M.D., a 

successful physician of Standish, 
Cumberland County, Me., was born 
in Limington, York County, Janu- 
ary 13, 1858. The family is of English ori- 
gin, several emigrants of this name having 
come from England to America in Colonial 
times. They were early settlers in Massachu- 
sctis, Rhode Island, and Maine, whence their 
descendants have scattered themselves through- 
out the United States. 

Dr. Randall's grandfather, Noah Randall, 
Sr., spent his early years in the town of Bald- 
win, Cumberland County, Me., being a tiller 
of the soil. For a time he was engaged in 
trade in Buxton, York County, but spent his 
last years in the town of Auburn, Androscog- 
gin County, where he was known as a hard- 
working farmer, his death occurring in 1868. 



at the age of sixty-six years. His wife was 
Ruth Haley, a sister of the well-known Deacon 
Haley, of Sebago. They reared six children, 
four of whom are now living, as follows: 
Noah, Jr., the Doctor's father; Charles E., a 
resident of Hollis, Me., who married Isabelle 
Maddock; Mary Jane, wife of Jacob Town- 
send, of Hollis, who has three children — 
Wilbur, Loring, and May Dora, wife of James 
Pillsbury, of Limington; and Daniel, who 
married Ella Carl, of Hollis, and has two 
children — Frank and Fred. The grandfather 
was a Republican in politics, and his wife, 
religiously, was a strong Universalist. 

Noah Randall, Jr., a native of Baldwin, 
was born December 1, 1825. He is a farmer 
by occupation, owning a good property in Lim- 
ington, which has been his home the larger 
part of his life. He is quite prominently 
identified with the affairs of that town, having 
served as Selectman many years, being elected 
to office on the Republican ticket, which he 
always supports. In 1848 he married Susan 
Huntress, daughter of Temple Huntress, of 
Hiram, in this State; and they reared seven 
children — John J., Emily J., Benjamin, 
Eunice, Simeon, Charles L., and Jesse A., all 
of whom became teachers in the public schools. 
John J. Randall, born October 10, 1849, 'Har- 
ried Sarah Lane, of Amesbury, Mass., by whom 
he has three children — Mabel, wife of Charles 
Wardrop, of Amesbury; Lena; and Edward. 
Emily J. Randall, born in 1851, is now the 
widow of the Rev. Henry Wentworth. She 
was formerly the wife of Alvin C. Moulton, 
who died, leaving her with three children — 
Hardie A., who married Grace Wheeler, of 
Boston; Hattie, the wife of George Roberts, 
of Gorham, who has one child, Evelyn; and 
Olin C. Moulton. Benjamin F. Randall, 
born in August, 1S53, married Emma J. 
Scammon, of Hollis, by whom he had two 
children, Susie and Albert, and died in 1SS2. 
Eunice A., born in 1855, is the wife of 
Charles Scammon, of Hollis, and has three 
children — John, Alice, and Benjamin. Sim- 
eon, born in 1856, married Evelyn Smith, of 
Tewksbury, Mass., and has three children - 
Marion, George, and an infant. Dr. Jesse 
A. Randall, born in December, 1863, married 
Mrs. Lillian Small, mr Libby, and is now 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'77 



practising medicine at Old Orchard, Me. 
Mrs. Susan H. Randall was a member of the 
Free Will Baptist church. 

Charles L. Randall obtained his early edu- 
cation in Limington, attending the common 
school and the academy, and then taught school 
several terms, being employed in Limington 
and the surrounding towns, lie subsequently 
took a course of medical study, and was grad- 
uated from the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons at Baltimore, Mil., in 1889. Going then 
to Tewksbury, Mass., Dr. Randall practised at 
the Massachusetts State Hospital for a year, 
coming from there to Standish in 1890. He 
has met with deserved success in his pro- 
fession, having already secured an excellent 
practice in this vicinity. 

Dr. Randall was married October 14, 1889, 
to Sophia Tuckfield, daughter of Charles 
Tuckfield, of North Branch, N.Y. In politics 
Dr. Randall affiliates with the Republicans, 
lie is much interested in advancing the edu- 
cational interests of the town, and for the past 
two years has been a member of the School 
Committee. Socially, he is a Mason, being a 
member of Adoniram Lodge, No. 27, of Lim- 
ington. 




ILLIAM TRICKEY, one of the old- 
est residents of Westbrook, Cum- 
berland County, and a highly re- 
spected citizen, was born May 2, 181 3, son of 
Daniel and Sarah (Johnson) Trickey. The 
family is of English origin; and its present 
representatives are the descendants of ances- 
tors who settled in York, York County, Me. 
Mr. Trickey's grandfather, John Trickey, who 
was an early pioneer in the lumbering indus- 
tries of the Pine Tree State, followed that 
business with prosperity, and was a well- 
known lumberman in his day. He reared a 
large family. 

His son, Daniel Trickey, Mr. Trickey's 
father, was born in Westbrook, and was a life- 
long resident of this town. He engaged in 
both farming and lumbering, his summers 
being spent in cultivating his land, and the 
winters in hauling logs, which he manufact- 
ured into lumber and marketed. He was an 
industrious and energetic business man, a 



worthy member of the community; and in his 
political affiliations he was a Democrat. He 
attended the Congregational church. His 
wife, Sarah Johnson, who was a native (if 
Westbrook, became the mother of seven chil- 
dren, two of whom are living, namely: Ellen, 
widow of the late S. G. Pike, of Calais, Me. ; 
and William, the subject of this sketch. 

William Trickey was educated in the public 
schools of Westbrook, and early began to make 
himself useful to his father in the work of the 
farm and in the lumber operations. After 
completing his studies he adopted agriculture 
as his occupation for life. When a young 
man he bought the old Longfellow farm in the 
adjoining town of Gorham, where he settled: 
and for a period of forty years he cultivated 
his land with ability and profit. He then re- 
turned to Westbrook, where he purchased the 
residence of the late Joseph Walker, and has 
since continued to reside here. 

Mr. Trickey was united in marriage with 
Sarah M. Marr, daughter of Robert P. Marr, of 
Scarboro, in 1842, and has had two children, as 
follows: Kate P., who resides with her father; 
and Etta S., wife of Herbert H. York, of 
Deering, Me. 

As an able and successful farmer Mr. 
Trickey has made a record which but few resi- 
dents in his locality can equal. He has al- 
ways devoted his undivided attention to his 
own private business; and, although a stanch 
supporter of the Democratic party, he has 
never allowed political aspirations to interfere 
with his occupations. He is to-day next to 
the oldest native resident of Westbrook, hav- 
ing now reached the advanced age of eighty- 
three years, and is still smart and active, both 
mentally and physically. He is well informed 
upon all current political issues, is a great 
admirer of President Cleveland; and in his 
religious views he is a Congregationalist. 




RTHUR WHITING PIERCE, Secre- 
tary of the Deering Building Loan 
Association and one of the most 
prominent young business men of 
that place, was born in Providence, R.I., Au- 
gust 5, 1 860, and is a son of William G. and 
Almira F. (Metcalf) Pierce. 



<78 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



William G. Pierce was also a native of 
Providence, born December 19, 1825. After 
attending the common schools of that city, he 
entered Brown University, from which he was 
subsequently graduated. He then went to 
China, where he spent six years in the employ 
of an American house. On his return to 
America, in company with another gentleman, 
he established a grocery business in Provi- 
dence, R.I., and was thus successfully engaged 
until he retired from a mercantile life. He 
was also President of the Northern Bank of 
that city. He died at the age of fifty years, 
December 25, 1875. His wife, Almira F., 
is ,1 daughter of Whiting Metcalf, a well- 
known business man of Providence. Their 
union was blessed by the birth of an only son, 
Arthur Whiting Pierce. Mrs. Pierce is still 
living, and is a member of the First Baptist 
Church of Providence. 

Arthur Whiting Pierce received his element- 
aiy education in a private school, after which 
he entered the Providence High School, and 
further pursued his studies under a private 
tutor. He began his business career in the 
employ of Tvvitchell & Champlin, wholesale 
grocers of Portland, Me., remaining with them 
for about two years. Following that he was 
interested in various lines of business until 
1893, when he became Secretary of the Deer- 
ing Building Loan Association, which posi- 
tion he still holds. He was married on Octo- 
ber 6, 1 886, to Miss Harriet W. Bolster, 
daughter of Mellen E. Bolster, of Portland. 
Their home has been brightened by the birth 
ul a son, William B. Pierce. 

Mr. Pierce, who takes an active interest in 
public affairs, was recently elected an Alder- 
man of the city of Deering from Ward 5, and 
is now serving on the Finance Committee, 
and on the Committee in charge of Sidewalks, 
Streets, Bridges, Lighting, Water, and Sewer- 
age, lie is well known in Masonic circles as 
a member of Atlantic Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
of Deering; Greenleaf Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons; the Portland Council; and St. Alban 
Commandery, Knights Templars. Among 
the other fraternal orders with which he is 
affiliated are Beacon Lodge, Independent 
Order of ()<\<\ Fellows, Portland Encampment, 
and Ivanhoe Lodge, Knights of Pythias. Mr. 



and Mrs. Pierce are .regular attendants of 
the Woodford's Congregational Church. 



-ABEZ MARRINER, who is carrying 
on an excellent grocery business at 
South Portland, was born January 14, 
1829, in Cape Elizabeth. His parents, 
James and Sarah (Dyer) Marriner, were both 
of pioneer stock, the Dyers having settled here 
at an early period, and Joseph Marriner, the 
paternal grandfather, having been engaged in 
agricultural pursuits in this vicinity for many 
years. He was a man of prominence in his 
day, and for several years served as Selectman 
of the town. His son James was the father of 
Jabez, the subject of this sketch. 

James Marriner was born and bred in the 
town, of Cape Elizabeth, learning in his 
younger clays the trade of ship carpentry, 
which was his principal occupation for many 
years. He spent his last years living retired 
in Portland. He was deeply interested in the 
cause of religion, being an active member of 
the Methodist church. In politics he was 
formerly a Democrat, but joined the ranks of 
the Republican party, when it was formed. 
Of his union with Miss Dyer seven sons and 
one daughter were born, Jabez being the only 
one now living. 

Jabez Marriner obtained his education in 
the schools of his native town and Portland, 
after which he served an apprenticeship with 
Thomas F. Roberts, a boat builder in Port- 
land, continuing to work at this trade until 
1855, when he went to Saccarappa, being 
there employed by his brother James as a house 
and carriage painter. In 1862 Mr. Marriner 
enlisted as a soldier in the late Civil War, 
joining Company H, Seventeenth Maine Vol- 
unteer Infantry, under command of Captain 
Almon Fogg, of Gorham, Me., serving as a 
private for two years and six months. With 
his regiment he was at the front in several 
engagements, including the battle of Chan- 
cellorsville, May 2, 1863, when Stonewall 
Jackson received his death wound. In 1864 
Mr. Marriner was honorably discharged from 
the service; and, returning to Saccarappa, he 
resumed his former work. In 1866 lie came 
to South Portland (then a part of Cape Eliza- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'79 



beth), which has since been his place of resi- 
dence. Trior to his enlistment he had served 
as assistant messenger to the Maine Senate, and 
in 1865 was a clerk in the Adjutant -general's 
office, under John L. Hodgson. From 1866 
until 1870, inclusive, Mr. Marriner was mes- 
senger of the Senate, serving until his ap- 
pointment as census taker at Cape Elizabeth 
in 1870. He continued working at the 
painter's trade until 1874, when he was ap- 
pointed by High Sheriff William L. Pennell 
as Deputy Sheriff, his especial duty being to 
assist in the enforcement of the liquor law, 
an office in which he served seven years. In 
[881 he established himself in the grocery 
business, meeting with such encouraging suc- 
cess that in 1S89 he built his present com- 
modious store; and the same year he was ap- 
pointed Postmaster, the office being located 
in his store, he retaining the position three 
years. Since that time Mr. Marriner has de- 
voted himself to his mercantile interests. He- 
has ever been a strong worker in the cause of 
temperance: and his very first vote was cast for 
Neal Dow, the candidate for Mayor in 1851. 
Mr. Marriner was united in marriage Sep- 
tember 7, 1S56, with Jane R. Libby, daughter 
of Nathan Libby, of Saccarappa, Me. Their 
union has been blessed by the birth of two 
children — James E. and Mary W. James E. 
Marriner, born May 14, i860, now a resident 
of Berlin Falls, N.H., married Hattie Thorpe, 
of Portland; and they have one child, James 
Theodore. Mary W. Marriner, born January 
9, 1865, lives at home with her parents. 



-OHN F. PROCTOR, along-established 

dealer in real estate and mortgages, 
whose office is at 93 Exchange Street, 
Portland, was born in this city, October 
18, 1S39, son of John C. and Lucinda P. 
( March ) Proctor. His paternal grandfather 
was William Proctor, of New Gloucester, 
Me., proprietor of a hotel known as "The 
Travellers' Home." John C. Proctor, father 
ol John F., was a pioneer in the real estate 
business in Portland, starting in 1852, and 
conducting a prosperous business up to the 
time of his death, which occurred July 28, 
1891. His wife, who is still living, at the 



age of eighty-two years, is the daughter oi a 
Revolutionary patriot, who was the youngest 
enlisted recruit in the United States Army, 
being only twelve years of age when he joined 
the ranks as fifer. He subsequently became 
High Sheriff of Cumberland County. Mrs. John 
C. Proctor was the mother of nine children. 

John F. Proctor received his education in 
the common schools and high school of Porl 
land, and first worked as a clerk in a shoe 
store, remaining two years. He then entered 
into business with his father, and spent four 
or five years in Vera Cruz, Mexico, where his 
brother Charles M. Proctor, who was United 
States Consul at that place, died in 1861. 
Mr. Proctor has been in his present business 
for about thirty-five consecutive years, having 
had charge of it since the death of his father, 
with whom he was associated some thirty 
years of that period. He is a competent and 
painstaking business man, and his sterling 
integrity and careful attention to the wants 
of his patrons have won for him an enviable 
reputation. 

Mr. Proctor married Fannie L., daughter of 
John (Haskell) Easterbrook, of Cambridge, 
Mass., and seven children have blessed their 
union, namely: Alma Louisa, who married 
Edward E. James, of Deering; Stella Ger- 
trude; Charles F. ; Annie E. : Mabel F. ; 
Josephine H. ; and Marion. Mr. Proctor's 
only son, Charles F., was married September 
18, 1895, to Eleanor, daughter of Edwin 
Griffin, of Portland. 

Politically, Mr. Proctor favors the Repub- 
lican party. He is well advanced in Masonry, 
belonging to Greenleaf Chapter, A F. & 
A. M. He and his wife are members of the 
First Unitarian Church of Portland. They 
have a pleasant home on Congress Street in 
Deering. 



^fOHN J. SYMONDS, the owner and 
occupant of one of the oldest farms in 
the town of Raymond, Me., near the 
north-western bolder of Cumberland 
County, was born here on October 8, 1822. 
His parents were Samuel J. and Elsa (Small) 
Symonds; and his paternal grandfather was 
Francis Symonds, a native of Salem, Mass. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Representatives of the Symonds family, 
which is of English origin, were among the 
original colonists of Essex County, Massachu- 
setts, the name of John Symonds occurring in 
the Salem records as long ago as 1637. 
Francis Symonds removed from Salem, Mass., 
to Raymond in the early days of this town, 
and purchased the farm now occupied by his 
grandson. Here he built a log house, which 
served as a home for himself and his family 
until circumstances permitted of the erection 
of a more modern structure. He lived to 
the advanced age of ninety-one years. The 
maiden name of his wife was Mary Jordan. 

Their son, Samuel J. Symonds, lived in a 
part of his father's house, and here spent his 
days, successfully engaged in farming, in con- 
nection with which he did a profitable lumber 
business. He died on March 17, 1862, in the 
sixty-eighth year of his age, the date of his 
birth being August 12, 1794. His wife, Elsa 
Small, was born in Raymond, February 23, 
1795, daughter of James and Peggy Small. 
After her husband's decease she resided with 
her son, John J. Symonds, until she, too, was 
called to pass from earth, October 12, 1875. 
She bore her husband nine children, namely: 
Mary J., born March 29, 18 19, who married 
Ephraim L. Brown, of Raymond (both now 
deceased); Orsamus, born November 5, 1820, 
who married Miss Mary Ann Whiting (now 
deceased), and lives in Poland, Me.; John J., 
a sketch of whose life appears below; Almina, 
born January 7, 1825, who married Marville 
White, and died August 23, 1851; Irene F., 
born November 30, 1827, who married Ben- 
jamin Davis, of Poland, and died May 25, 
1857;. Clarinda J., born March 27, 1830, now 
the wife of Louis Shurtleff, of New Glouces- 
ter, Me.; Eliza J., born October 29, 1832, 
who married Nathaniel Shurtleff, of Walnut- 
ville, Me.; Francis, born January 27, 1836, 
who married Miss Martha Hall, and died on 
< »( tober 10, 1875, his wife now living in Nor- 
way; Phcebe N., bom March 17, 1841, who 
married George Hatch, of New Gloucester, 
and is now deceased. 

John J. Symonds grew to manhood in his 
native town, living with his grandfather 
Symonds, and in his childhood obtaining a 
common-school education. At fourteen years 



of age he took up the active duties of life, and 
was soon able to do a man's work on the farm. 
Thirty acres with the old buildings fell to him 
from his grandfather. The rest of his estate 
of two hundred and fifty acres is of his own 
purchasing, and the buildings were all erected 
by him. As a result of his well -directed 
energy and faithful attention to business, he 
now has one of the finest farms in Raymond. 
He makes a specialty of dairying, keeping 
twenty cows, from which he sells milk. He 
also gives some attention to stock raising, and 
he keeps five horses. The principal products 
of his farm are hay, corn, grain, and fruit. 

On June 18, 1843, he was married to Miss 
Jane Strout, who was born in this town, July 
15, 1823, a daughter of Elias and Rhoda 
(Strout) Strout. Her father was one of the 
pioneers of the town, and an honored and re- 
spected citizen, by occupation a farmer. Mr. 
and Mrs. Symonds are the parents of four chil- 
dren, two sons and two daughters, briefly 
mentioned as follows; Rhoda, the wife of 
Almon Brown, of Aroostook County, Maine, 
has a son and two daughters — Emma Barber, 
Ina Leavitt, and John Brown; Warren, living 
near the old homestead, married Miss Mary 
E. Spiller, who has borne him four children 

-Louis, John J., Ruth I., and Maude E. ; 
Charles F., residing with his parents, married 
Miss El vena S. Allen, of Raymond, and has 
a daughter, Etta W. ; Arabelle, the wife of 
Elmer Riggs, of Raymond, has two children 

-Jennie L. and Anna Eliza. The Demo- 
cratic party numbers Mr. Symonds among its 
faithful supporters. He and his family attend 
church at East Raymond. 



WILLIAM H. McLELLAN, a black- 
smith and farmer, residing in Gor- 
ham, is a native-born citizen, his 
birth having occurred here, May 10, 1845. 
His great-great-grandfather, Hugh McLellan, 
was the original ancestor in this country, com- 
ing to Cumberland County from Ireland, the 
place of his birth. He was one of the earliest 
settlers of Gorham, building the first brick 
house ever erected within its limits. This 
house is still standing on the Fort Hill road, 
being in a good state of preservation. The 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



next in line of descent was Carey McLellan; 
and then came William McLellan, Sr., grand- 
father of William II. William McLellan, 
Sr., was a lifelong resilient of Gorham and a 
farmer by occupation. He married Mehitabel 
Harmon, who bore him eight children, two of 
whom are now living — John, a resident of 
New Orleans; and Eunice, wife of Henry 
1 [armon, of Scarboro. 

William McLellan, Jr., father of William 
1L, was the fourth child of the parental house- 
hold. On arriving at man's estate, he settled 
down to farming on the old homestead, where 
he continued until his death in 185 1. His 
wife, Mary Jane, daughter of Nathaniel 
Meserve, of New Hampshire, survived him ten 
years, dying in.1861. Both were Baptists in 
religion, and the father was a Democrat in 
politics. Of the seven children born to them, 
six are living, the following being their rec- 
ord : Eliza Ann, widow of Ezekiel Harmon, of 
Hollis, Me., has two children — Merrow and 
Jane; Mary W., wife of Alexander Allen, of 
Gorham, has four children — Elmira, Delia, 
Frank, and Edgar; Charles I. married the 
late Clara Libby, who died January 16, 1S88, 
leaving three children — Mary, Charles, and 
Albert; William H. is the chief subject of 
this sketch; Winifred, wife of George Doug- 
las, has five children — Orman, Adma, Frank, 
Clifford, and Alverdo; John married Cassan- 
dana Haskell, of Windham, and has six chil- 
dren — Eva, Herbert, Mellen, Annie, Bertha, 
and Hugh. 

William H. McLellan attended the public 
schools of Gorham during his boyhood, and 
afterward went to Saco, where he worked four- 
teen months for Littlefield & Towle, learning 
the blacksmith's trade. Going from Saco to 
Portland, he worked at his trade five years, 
first with Martin Pennell, and then with J. M. 
Kimball. On account of ill health he gave 
up all work for a time, remaining unemployed 
until 1874, when he went to Little Falls vil- 
lage, in the town of Gorham, where he 
resumed blacksmithing, working with his 
brother, John McLellan. In 1S76 he estab- 
lished himself in business in Gorham, build- 
ing up an extensive patronage in this locality. 
In 1887 he bought his farm of sixty acres, on 
which he has since resided, carrying on gen- 



eral husbandry. As soon as well settled on 
his farm he erected his present blacksmith's 
shop, and now divides his attention between 
the plough and the forge, being very success- 
ful in both branches of industry. 

On September 24, 1876, Mr. McLellan was 
united in marriage with Ella M., fourth 
daughter of Oliver P. Haskell, of Windham. 
Her parents reared nine children, seven girls 
and two boys. They are both members of the 
Baptist church, of North Gorham. Mr. and 
Mrs. McLellan have three children, as fol- 
lows: George W., born February 18, 1878; 
Ada N., born July 6, 1882; and Mary J., 
born July 28, 1884. Mr. and Mrs. McLellan 
attend the Baptist church. In politics Mr. 
McLellan is independent; and, socially, he 
is identified by membership with Gorham 
Lodge, No. 98, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows; Oriental Lodge, No. 17, Knights of 
Pythias; and with Nagwaumquay Tribe, No. 
36, of South Windham. 



(^YSAPH TRUE, who was born April 20, 
fcLl 1849, at Freeport, this county, on the 
y j|A old True homestead, where he now 

^*~^ resides, is the only living male rep- 
resentative of his family, which has long held 
an honored place in this neighborhood. Mr. 
True's farm of eighty-four acres is in an excel- 
lent state of cultivation, bearing strong evi- 
dence of the great labor which has been be- 
stowed upon it since the year 1802, when his 
paternal grandfather, William True, settled 
here in the wilderness, cutting the first tree 
from the dense forest, and building the origi- 
nal dwelling, which is now a part of the family 
residence. The grandfather was a man of 
shrewd intelligence, a Whig in politics and 
among the foremost citizens of his day, serv- 
ing for many years as Selectman. Religiously, 
both he and his wife, Eunice Sawyer, who came 
with him to Freeport, were consistent mem- 
bers of the Baptist church, rearing their chil- 
dren to the same faith. William True was 
one of four sons of Israel and Mary (McEntire) 
True, and was born at North Yarmouth, Au- 
gust 10, 1776. 

His son, Joseph True, was born on May 2, 
1813, and was reared to pioneer life on the 



182 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



family homestead, attending the district 
school, and assisting in clearing and improv- 
ing the land until of age. He then learned 
the trade of ship carpentry, after which he 
went to sea, being first mate of a vessel for 
several years, following this life until his re- 
tirement to the old homestead, where his death 
occurred in 1888. He married Jane R Wins- 
low, daughter of Philip and Bethiah (Rideout) 
Winslow. She was born May 1, 181 5, in New 
Gloucester, and is now living on the home- 
stead farm, a hale and hearty woman, bearing 
with ease her burden of years. Four children 
were born to her and her husband, as follows: 
Josephine, the wife of Smith Johnson, of 
Freeport; Asaph, the subject of this sketch; 
Jane R., widow of Newell M. Ricker, residing 
in Portland, Me. ; and Hattie J., who resides 
with her mother and brother. 

Asaph True was educated in the Freeport 
schools, likewise being well drilled in the 
days of his youth in agricultural labors, in 
which he is still successfully employed. He 
carries on mixed husbandry, besides which he 
is extensively engaged in dairying, making 
that profitable industry quite a specialty. 
Politically, he is a stanch Republican: and, re- 
ligiously, he is liberal in his views. With 
his mother and sister he lives a pleasant and 
useful life, enjoying himself and contributing 
his share toward making others happy. 



f 39EORGE RUSSELL, a retired ship- 
V •) I builder, living in East Deering-, 
^ — ■*" Cumberland County, Me., was born 
June 16, 1825, in Hopewell, Westmoreland 
County, N.B., son of Stewart and Abigail 
(Cutler) Russell. On the paternal side 
Mr. Russell is of Irish antecedents, his 
grandfather, Robert Russell, having emigrated 
from Ireland to Nova Scotia, where he taught 
school for several years, later settling on a 
farm in Hopewell, N.B. On the maternal 
side Mr. Russell is descended from Ebenezer 
Cutler, a native of Dorchester, Mass., and a 
graduate of Harvard College. In 1776, dur- 
ing the Revolutionary War, Mr. Cutler's 
father, being loyal to the British Crown, 
moved with his family to Nova Scotia, settling 
in the town of Annapolis. 



Stewart Russell was born and reared in 
Hopewell, N.B. He learned the ship car- 
penter's trade when a young man, an occupa- 
tion which he followed much of his active life, 
although he made several voyages on the 
ocean as master of a sailing-vessel. His wife, 
Abigail Cutler, daughter of the above-men- 
tioned Ebenezer Cutler, bore him ten chil- 
dren, eight of whom grew to mature years, 
George, the subject of this sketch, being the 
second son. 

George Russell acquired his early education 
in the place of his nativity, finishing his 
studies at a private school in Moncton, N.B. 
Possessing native mechanical ability, he early 
learned the use of tools, but never served an 
apprenticeship at any trade. When about 
eighteen years old, he commenced life as a 
sailor, shipping on the "Agenoria," which 
was built and owned by Stewart Russell and 
by his brother Robert, and was commanded by 
the latter. Adam Russell, a son of Captain 
Russell, was also one of the crew of this 
vessel, and continued on it until a few years 
later, when both craft and crew were lost, no 
tidings ever coming from the ill-fated vessel 
or the sturdy mariners who manned her. 

A few trips convinced Mr. Russell that he 
was not adapted to a seafaring life; and when 
on a certain voyage he visited a shipyard in 
Lubec, where he found the men laying the 
keel of a ship, he immediately left his vessel, 
and there secured work as a carpenter. After 
the vessel upon which he was working was 
launched, he returned to his home in New 
Brunswick, and remained there until 1846, 
when he came again to Maine, working through 
that summer as a ship carpenter, at a place 
known as Bailey's Mistake. In the fall he 
entered the employment of Captain John 
Walls, a ship-builder in Pembroke, where he 
worked six years, being superintendent of the 
shipyard the most of the time. 

In 185 1 Mr. Russell 'started in business on 
his own account, buying and fitting up a yard, 
which he managed several years, building 
over twenty vessels. With characteristic en- 
terprise he established at the same time a 
store of general merchandise, continuing that 
also until 1864, when he sold both the store 
and the yard. Coming then to Deering, Mr. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'83 



Russell opened a shipyard, and here built 
more than fifty sail of vessels, being in active 
business until 1891, when he retired to the 
enjoyment of a well-earned competency. He 
has always supported the Republican ticket, 
and since 1892 has served on the Board of 
Health, the present being his second term in 
this office; and he has also served on the 
School Board from 1893 to 1896. Socially, 
he is a member of Deering Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M. ; Greenleaf Royal Arch Chapter, No. 
13, Portland; and was a member of the Good 
Templars, and likewise of the Sons of Temper- 
ance, in the early organization of these orders. 
On October 28, 1847, Mr. Russell was 
united in marriage with Mary Skofield Childs, 
a daughter of Otis Childs, of Eastport, Me., 
where her birth occurred, January 9, 1821. 
Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Russell, namely: George Edward, deceased; 
Abigail S. ; Ednah A., the wife of the Hon. 
W. W. Morrill, ex-Mayor of this city; Eben 
G., all of whom reside in Deering; and 
Martha B., preceptress of the Ricker Classical 
Institute at Houlton, Me. Mr. and Mrs. Rus- 
sell are active members of the Free Street 
Baptist Church of Portland. Mr. Russell has 
always maintained a deep interest in religious 
movements; and on May 15, 1S69, he helped 
organize a union Sunday-school in the village 
where he resides — -at that time a part of the 
town of Westbrook, but now city of Deering 
— and served as superintendent of this school 
for seventeen years. 



'OSEPH HALL CARLETON, the only 
resident member of the well-known 
firm of Carleton Brothers & Co., of 
Portland, wholesale and retail dealers 
in lime, cement, plaster, hair, brick, etc., was 
born at Rockport, Knox County, Me., March 
31, 1S59. He is of English antecedents, his 
first ancestor in this country having settled in 
Methuen, Mass., from which place Mr. Hall's 
paternal grandfather came to this State, locat- 
ing in Camden, Knox County. There on 
December 22, 1825, occurred the birth of our 
subject's father, Philander J. Carleton. He 
was born in that portion of Camden now 
known as Rockport, and is now one of its most 



prosperous business men, being actively en- 
gaged as a ship-builder and a lime manufact- 
urer. He is senior member of the firm of 
Carleton, Norwood & Co., and also a member 
of the firm of Carleton Brothers & Co. of this 
city. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Sarah Babb, was a native of Westbrook, Me. 
She was born in 1826, and died September 8, 
1894, leaving four sons — Frank P. ]., Henry 
B., Ralph W., and Joseph Hall. 

Joseph Hall Carleton was educated in the 
common and the high schools of his native 
town. At the age of eighteen years he began 
business life as a clerk in the grocery store of 
Carleton, Norwood & Co., remaining until 
1S82, nearly four years, and becoming thor- 
oughly acquainted with the details of the busi- 
ness. He then became a member of the firm 
of Carleton, Pascal & Co., in which he still 
holds an interest. In 1887 Mr. Carleton 
came to Portland, and, in partnership with his 
father, Philander, and his brother Ralph W., 
bought the business of L. C. Cummings & 
Co., in which he is now engaged, the firm 
name being changed to its present style in 
January, 1888, and the members being Joseph 
H., Ralph W., and Philander J. Carleton. 
They carry on an extensive business, their 
manufactures being widely and favorably 
known, and finding a ready market in Rock- 
port and the vicinity. 

As yet Mr. Carleton is not bound by 
hymeneal ties; but his social duties engross 
a portion of his time, as he is a member of 
several organizations, belonging to St. Albans 
Commandery, in which he has taken the 
thirty-second degree of Masonry; to the 
Mount Battie Lodge, No. 102, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of Camden; to the Fal- 
mouth Club; to the Portland Athletic Club; 
to the Young Men's Democratic Club; and to 
the Portland Yacht Club. He is an unswerv- 
ing Democrat in politics, and, religiously, is 
an active member of the Episcopal church. 



Y?g\EANDER L. HAWKES, a successful 

I —I business man of Westbrook, dealer in 

Jlsl wood, coal, and ice, was born in 

V ' Windham, Me., July 30, 1850. 

He is a son of Joshua L. and Sarah K. (May- 



184 



UIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



berry) Hawkes, both his parents being natives 
of Windham, in which place his paternal 
grandfather resided for many years, engaged 
in the pursuit of agriculture. The grand- 
father was ah old-time Democrat in politics, 
and always took an active interest in the public 
weal. In religious belief he was a Quaker. 

Joshua L. Hawkes, father of Neander L., 
was born in Windham, and there spent his 
life, engaged in farming. In religious belief 
he was a Methodist, and in politics a Repub- 
lican, though never an aspirant for public- 
honors. His death occurred in 1878. His 
wife Sarah was a daughter of Andrew May- 
berry, of Windham. Seven children were 
born to them, six of whom are living, 
namely: Abner L., a brick manufacturer in 
Westbrook; Joseph, now a resident of Dakota; 
Marietta, who resides in Portland, Me. ; 
Clarissa, wife of F. D. Winslow, of Portland: 
Sarah, wife of A. D. Woodbury, of West- 
brook; and Neander L., whose name prefaces 
this article. 

Neander L. Hawkes received his education 
in the public schools of Windham, at Gorham 
Academy, and in the Westbrook High School, 
lie helped his father about the farm until 
reaching the age of twenty years, and then 
entered the employ of Sumner Bolton, of Gor- 
ham, to learn the trade of a clothing pressman. 
Mr. Bolton manufactured clothing for Boston 
firms, and had a large and flourishing business. 
Mr. Hawkes remained in his employ about six 
months; and then, after four months' experi- 
ence in a plaster and grain mill, returned to 
the home farm at Windham, where he re- 
mained until 1885. In that year he en- 
gaged in the ice business in Westbrook, in 
company with his brother, Abner L. ; and in 
18S7 he purchased his brother's interest, be- 
diming sole proprietor of the business. Ik- 
was eminently successful, being for about six 
years the only ice dealer in Westbrook. 
About two years ago he added coal and wood 
to his stock in trade, and he has also trans- 
acted a considerable amount of business in 
real estate. Besides a share in the home- 
stead he owns some twenty-five acres of land 
on Stroud water Street, Westbrook, which he 
has improved and cut into house lots, making 
two new streets, and building a number of 



houses; and in company with his brother, 
Abner L., he erected a brick manufacturing 
plant. Mr. Hawkes's private estate, which in- 
cludes a substantial brick house and commodi- 
ous barn, is one of the finest in Westbrook. 

In September, 1879, Mr. Hawkes was 
united in marriage with Clara, daughter of 
Peter Morrison, of New Brunswick. 

Mr. I Iawkes's political affiliations are with 
the Republican party. Socially, he belongs 
to the Improved Order of Red Men, being a 
member of S. D. Warren Tribe of Cumberland 
Mills; and in religious belief he is a Meth- 
odist. 




RS. DORCAS HOPKINS BANKS 
is the widow of Elias Banks, who 
at one time was a merchant of 
Portland. She was born in this 
city in an old-fashioned house that stood on 
the corner of Brackett and Danforth Streets, 
November 29, 181 5. Her parents were James 
Dean and Dorcas (Tucker ) Hopkins; and she 
is of English descent, her father having been 
born in England. Her paternal grandfather, 
whose name was Thomas Hopkins, was a na- 
tive of Axminster, Devonshire, England. He 
came to this country with his family in 1784, 
and purchased property in Portland on Con- 
gress and Middle Streets, which is still in 
the family. 

James Dean Hopkins was twelve years of 
age when his parents settled in Portland; and 
he received the greater part of his education in 
this city. He studied for the bar, and in 
time became one of the most prominent 
lawyers of Portland, where he was in active 
practice for many years. He was at one time 
President of the Cumberland County Bar; and 
he numbered among his personal friends Judge 
Mellon, Professor Simon Greenleaf, and 
Stephen Longfellow, the father of the poet. 
The house in which Mrs. Banks now resides 
was erected by her father in 1823. His wife, 
Dorcas Tucker Hopkins, the mother of Mrs. 
Banks, was the daughter of Captain Daniel 
Tucker, who long followed the sea as a master 
mariner. The last fifteen years of Captain 
Tucker's life were passed in Gorham, retired 
from active work. 



i'S& 




ELIAS BANKS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



187 



Dorcas Hopkins received a good education 
in the schools of Portland, and resided with 
her parents until her marriage, which occurred 
in 1S45. Her husband, Elias Banks, was 
identified with the mercantile life of Portland 
up to the time of his death in 1882. Four 
children were born to them, but one of whom, 
a daughter named Elizabeth II., is now liv- 
ing. She has been twice married. By her 
first husband, George Whittier, of Portland, 
she had one child, Margaret Dean Whittier; 
and by her second husband, Edward H. Toby, 
of Brooklyn, N.Y., she has one son, Donald 
Banks Toby. Mr. and Mrs. Toby reside in 
Brooklyn. Mary Banks, the second child of 
Mr. and Mrs. Elias Banks, passed but five 
brief summers on earth. Edward Prince 
Banks, the elder son, who was born in 1848, 
and was a clerk in the First National Bank of 
Portland, died in 1893, at the age of forty- 
four. The younger son, William Seward 
Banks, who was born in 1854, and was a well- 
known druggist in Portland, died in 1890. 

Mrs. Banks is a member of the Congrega- 
tional church on High Street, to which her 
husband also belonged, and of which her chil- 
dren Elizabeth and Edward were members. 
Her residence, which was built over seventy 
years ago, is one of the substantial homes of 
Portland, and suits well the owner, who bears 
gracefully the burden of her fourscore years, 
appearing much younger than she acknowl- 
edges herself to be. 



JB 



ANIEL R. STOVER, superintendent 
of schools at Harpswell, Me., was 
born near his present residence in 
West Harpswell, January 5, 1846, 
son of Paul and Lydia (•Dinsmore) Stover. 
His great-great-grandfather, John Stover, was 
born in York County, Maine, and was one of 
the pioneers of Harpswell, locating here as 
early as 1727. He died in 1786. His son, 
Johnson Stover (great-grandfather), was born 
in Harpswell, and was one of the prominent 
farmers of the locality, owning Upper Goose 
Island and a tract of land on Harpswell Neck, 
then known as Merryconeag. He died in 
1828 at the age of seventy-nine. 

Norton Stover, son of Johnson and the 



grandfather of Daniel R., was also a native 
of Harpswell and a farmer. He married 
Huldah, only child of Daniel Randall, who 
had purchased on December 8, 1773, of 
Thomas and Susannah McGray the farm on 
which Daniel R. Stover now resides. At the 
time of his death Daniel Randall owned seven- 
teen hundred acres of land in different parts 
of the State. Grandfather Stover died at the 
age of seventy-five. His wife was born and 
married, lived and died, in her father's house, 
now standing on the old homestead. She 
passed away in her sixty-ninth year, having 
been the mother of a large family. 

Paul Stover, son of Norton and Huldah 
(Randall) Stover, acquired what knowledge 
the common schools afforded, and early be- 
came familiar with the details of farm work. 
He built in 1849 the house now occupied by 
his son, and obtained a comfortable living 
from the soil which had afforded generous sus- 
tenance to his forefathers. Actively inter- 
ested in public affairs, he was Captain of the 
local militia; and his sword, now in the pos- 
session of his son, is still bright, though the 
hand that bore it is crumbled to dust. He 
died at the age of seventy-five. His wife, 
who was born in the year marked by the birth 
of Queen Victoria, was a daughter of Thomas 
Dinsmore, of Anson, Me., where she was 
born. Mr. Dinsmore was a lumberman, and 
was a Major in the militia. His daughter, 
Mrs. Stover, died at the age of sixty-four. 
She was a zealous member of the Baptist 
church, in which her husband was Deacon. 
Five children blessed their union, all except 
one of whom reached maturity; but at present 
Daniel R. is the only one living. 

Daniel R. Stover attended the common 
schools of his native town, prepared for col- 
lege at Westbrook Seminary, and entered 
Colby University, intending to complete the 
course; but after three years' close study he 
was obliged to leave his class on account of 
ill health. Although he did not receive a 
diploma, he was well grounded in the various 
branches of knowledge, and became a most 
successful teacher. He taught for over twenty 
years in different grades, including the high 
school; in 1888 was appointed supervisor of 
schools ; and when the town system was 



1 88 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIF.W 



adopted he was made superintendent of schools 
in Harpswell. This is a position of great re- 
sponsibility, entailing among other duties the 
examination and selection of teachers and the 
supervision of school supplies. The schools 
in the town are far apart, and it often hap- 
pens that Mr. Stover is obliged to rise at 3 
a.m. in order to be at certain schools at nine 
o'clock. He attends closely to the duties of 
his position, to which he devotes the greater 
part of his time; and he also keeps the home 
farm in a high state of cultivation. 

Mr. Stover is a prominent member of the 
Democratic party. He was in the legislature 
in 1876 and 1877, serving with distinction 
as a member of the Committee on Education, 
and was twice nominated State Senator. He 
is now a member of the Democratic County 
Committee, and was a member of the Town 
Committee for many years. He belongs to 
but one social organization, the Good Tem- 
plars. Mr. Stover has long been an attendant 
of the Baptist church in Harpswell, and has 
taught in the Sunday-school for many years. 
He has never married, but is content to be 
sole ruler in his home kingdom, finding in 
books alone a congenial and satisfying com- 
panionship. 

He has given attention to archaeology, and 
was greatly interested, when, in the fall of 
1895, his nephew, Charles, in ploughing on 
the home farm, disinterred from an ancient 
shell-heap a quantity of human bones, both of 
young children and of very old persons. The 
larger bones were split, like those found asso- 
ciated with flint implements in the prehistoric 
caves of Europe, indicating that this was once 
the site of cannibal feasts. 




ENRY M. STONE, who sold tickets 
at Falmouth, Me., for the first rail- 
way train that passed through the 
town between forty-five and fifty 
years ago, and has since been in charge of the 
office at that point, is probably the oldest 
station agent east of Boston, in length of ser- 
vice, if not in years. He was born in Cum- 
berland, Me., January 31, 1823, son of the 
Rev. Samuel and Cynthia (Hawley) Stone. 
Samuel Stone was a Congregational minis- 



ter. His first parish was at Cumberland 
Centre, where he settled about 1820. Two 
years later he went to Warren, but had only 
preached there about a year when failing health 
caused him to give up ministerial labors for a 
time. He returned to Cumberland, where he 
owned a place, and went into trade, carrying 
on a general store for two years. After that 
he was engaged in the same business in Au- 
burn, Me., for about three years. In the 
mean time he had exchanged his place in 
Cumberland Centre for one in Falmouth, 
Me., to which he now removed, first selling 
out his store. From Falmouth he went to 
old York, Me., where he resumed his pastoral 
work, having charge of the Congregational 
church in that place between two and three 
years. He then removed to Tunbridge, Vt., 
which was his last regular parish. A year or 
two later he returned to Falmouth, and lived 
there until his death, preaching only occasion- 
ally. The Rev. Samuel Stone died in 1874 
at the advanced age of eighty-six years. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Cynthia Haw- 
ley, bore him six children, three of whom are 
now living: Henry M. Stone; Samuel D. 
Stone, of South Framingham, Mass.; and 
Cynthia E., the widow of Major F. Bowie, 
of Boston. In politics Samuel Stone was a 
Whig until the formation of the Republican 
party, which he afterward supported. 

Henry M. Stone received his education in 
the public schools of Cumberland, Falmouth, 
Auburn, and York, Me. After leaving school 
he went to Windham, Vt., to learn shoemak- 
ing with J. & R. Mansfield, manufacturers of 
ladies' shoes. Six years later he came to Fal- 
mouth, Me., and was engaged at shoemaking 
and repairing during the succeeding three 
years, up to 1849. At that time he obtained 
the position of station agent on the Atlantic 
& St. Lawrence Railroad, now the Grand 
Trunk Railroad, at Falmouth; and he has 
been here continually ever since. 

Over fifty years ago, on January 18, 1846, 
Mr. Stone was united in marriage with Miss 
Catherine L. Blake, a daughter of Enoch J. 
Blake, of Cabot, Vt. Six children have been 
born of their union, of whom four are still 
living: Celia A., the wife of Charles F. Dun- 
lap, of Portland, Me. ; Elmer D. Stone, the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



proprietor of the Auburn Last Company at 
South Framingham, Mass.; E. Miriam Stone, 
a resident of Portland; and Kate £., the wife 
of John Garland, of Marlboro, Mass. 

On Saturday, January 1 8, 1896, Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry M. Stone celebrated their fiftieth 
wedding anniversary, children, grandchildren, 
and great-grandchildren uniting in the festiv- 
ities. The home was tastefully decorated with 
plants and flowers, among them a bouquet of 
fifty pinks. After dinner, which was served 
at two o'clock, remarks were made by the Rev. 
J. A. Flint, followed by instrumental and 
vocal music, and a poem written by William 
P. Merrill. The numerous presents, includ- 
ing one hundred dollars in gold, left with the 
worthy couple, testified to the good will and 
generosity of many friends. 

Mr. Stone cast his first Presidential vote for 
James K. Polk, the Democratic nominee who 
was elected in 1844, and continued to vote 
that ticket until the organization of the Re- 
publican party, which he supported until 
President Cleveland's second nomination, 
when he voted for him. He is a member of 
Presumpscot Lodge, No. 91, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of Falmouth, in which 
lie has served in the various chairs; and during 
the past seven years he has filled the office of 
Treasurer. Although Mr. Stone has passed 
the threescore years and ten milestone, he 
still enjoys rugged health. He is one of the 
must popular residents of the town and an 
attendant of the Congregational church. 




,APTAIN JOSEPH YOUNG, a re- 
tired navigator, occupying the home- 
stead of which his great-grand- 
father, Solomon Loring, was the 
original proprietor, is one of Yarmouth's most 
respected citizens. His birth occurred not far 
from the spot where he now resides, September 
24, 1825, he being the eldest of the children 
born to John and Sophronia (Davis) Young. 
Among the very early settlers of this seaport 
town was a Joseph Young, who, with his 
young wife, Sarah Drinkwater, located here 
in Colonial days, and here reared their family, 
among their children being Bazaleel Young, 
the grandfather of Captain Young. 



Bazaleel Young was born in 1764, and lived 
to the age of fifty-seven years, dying in Yar- 
mouth, July 26, 1 82 1. He spent his years of 
active life on the seas, being a ship com- 
mander a large part of the time; and during 
our war with England he and his vessel's crew 
were captured, and held as prisoners three 
months. He was a very successful business 
man, and held in high regard by his fellow- 
townsmen. He was a Whig in politics, and 
a member of the Congregational church. He 
married Mary Loring, a descendant of the 
Lorings of Yarmouth and the daughter of the 
above-mentioned Solomon Loring and his 
wife, Alice dishing. They reared the follow- 
ing children: Hannah, William, John, Joseph, 
Mary Ann, Charles, Theodocia, Sarah Jane, 
and Elizabeth L. 

John Young followed the sea during his 
early years, and was master of a vessel for a 
long time. He subsequently turned his at- 
tention to agriculture, becoming owner of the 
old Loring farm, living on this place till his 
death, January 19, 1881. He was a man of 
marked intelligence and ability, active in 
town affairs, and served in various official ca- 
pacities, being Selectman several terms; and 
in 1850 he was census taker for Yarmouth 
and North Yarmouth. His wife, Sophronia 
Davis, was born April 2, 1802, in Conway, 
N.H., and died on this homestead, July 5, 
1867. She was the descendant of one of the 
early families of New England, and was the 
daughter of John Davis, a Revolutionary pa- 
triot, who served throughout the entire 
struggle, being in the battle of Bunker Hill, 
as well as in many other important and deci- 
sive engagements, and bearing with him to 
the grave the scar of a dangerous wound re- 
ceived in service. Mr. Davis subsequently 
removed to this State, spending his last days 
in the town of Norway, where both he and his 
wife, whose maiden name was Martha Walker, 
died, full of years and honor. 

John Young and his wife reared a family of 
eight children, four of whom have passed to 
the bourne from which no traveller returneth, 
namely: Captain Francis E., born April 6, 
1S29, a ship-master, who died May 12, 1856, 
in South America; John W., born May 16, 
1831, died in Chelsea, Mass., in 1857; Alice 



IQO 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



dishing Young, born November 3, 1.S36, 
died January 20, i860; and Martha Walker 
Young, born June 29, 1838, died August 27, 
1855. The four living are: Captain Joseph; 
Mrs. Caroline Howard Russell, of this town, 
born August 10, 1833, now the widow of the 
late William Russell, who died in 1888; 
Charles, born June 16, 1840, now residing in 
Eureka, Cal. ; and Addin, born December 7, 
1843, a hardware merchant in West Somer- 
ville, Mass- 
Joseph Young was reared a farmer's boy, re- 
ceiving his education in the district schools, 
afterward spending a short time at the North 
Yarmouth Academy. At the age of seventeen 
years he shipped before the mast on board the 
schooner "Boston," commanded by Captain 
David Seabury; and after three years he was 
made mate of a vessel, serving first under Cap- 
tain Jerry Buckman, afterward going with 
Captain Joseph Drinkwater on the "Lucy 
Ann" to the West Indies. He subsequently 
was given command of the "Petrel," and for 
many years was engaged in the West India 
trade, which was then the principal business 
of this section of the State, he being Captain 
of the following vessels: the "A. G. Hill," 
a bark; "Samuel Fales," a ship which he 
commanded six years; "Eureka," a bark; 
"Abyla," a bark; "Alice Vanard," a ship; 
and the "P. C. Merryman," a bark, which was 
under his command for a number of years. 
During the twoscore years that Captain 
Young sailed the seas he visited many of the 
more hriportant ports of the world, and in his 
various voyages met with great prosperity, 
winning an excellent record for seamanship. 
The only accident causing loss that ever befell 
him was during a voyage across the Indian 
Ocean, when his ship was struck by a cyclone, 
and a few spars were sent overboard, the valu- 
able cargo being entirely saved through his 
energetic efforts. The owners afterward com- 
plimented Captain Young very highly for his 
wise and heroic management, as in that storm 
many vessels were wrecked. 

Captain Young retired from the sea in 1885, 
and has since lived on the old home farm, 
where, in a situation commanding a fine view 
of Portland Harbor and the islands within, he 
has built a fine residence. This place is rich 



in historical associations, as on the very spot 
occupied by the Captain's dwelling the first 
meeting-house in the town was built, its pul- 
pit being occupied for forty years by Parson 
Gilman, a preacher of note, who was succeeded 
by Francis Brown, also a prominent divine of 
olden times; and here George Whitefield, the 
English evangelist, held his hearers spell- 
bound one Sunday, in years long gone by. In 
that old meeting-house never a fire was built, 
neither was it desecrated by artificial light 
of any kind. Not far from the farm-house 
stood the old garrison, or fort, used by the 
early settlers as a refuge from the savages, who 
were distrustful of the new-comers, the latter 
being obliged to go armed, even to attend 
public worship, Massachusetts having passed a 
law to that effect, saying that every man should 
"take to meeting on Lord's days his arms with 
him, with at least five charges of powder and 
shot." 

On June 26, 1855, Captain Young was mar- 
ried to Mahala A. Hill, who is a native of this 
town. She was born January 3, 1830, daugh- 
ter of James and Lucinda (Anderson) Hill, 
both descendants of pioneers of Cumberland 
County. Five children have been born to 
Captain and Mrs. Young, three of whom are 
living, namely: Frank E., whose birth date 
was April 4, 1S57; Grace H., born June 16, 
i860; and Joseph A., born May 20, 1871, the 
last two being at home with their parents. 
The others were: Hattie L., born July 10, 
1867, died August 20, 1869; and Helen, who 
was born November 14, 1873, on the South 
Pacific Ocean, died February 23, 1874, on the 
South Atlantic, and was buried at Cardiff, 
Wales. 

In politics the Captain is a stanch Repub- 
lican; and, socially, he is a Mason, belonging 
to Casco Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and likewise 
to the Royal Arch Chapter. Religiously, 
both he and his wife are valued members of 
the Congregational church. 



OHN H. DAVIS, of Standish, Me., 
was born within the limits of this town, 
October 21, 1833, son of Isaac and 
Abigail (Whitney) Davis. His pro- 
genitors were of English origin, the first of his 




WILLIAM WIDGERY THOMAS, SR. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



193 



branch of the Davis family to land on Ameri- 
can soil having been Robert Davis, who left 
England in 1643. He settled in Yarmouth, 
on Cape Cod, Mass., but afterward changed 
his place of residence to Barnstable. The 
line was continued through Joseph Davis, and 
then his son, Gershom Davis, who was born 
in Barnstable, and next, Samuel Davis, son of 
Gershom, born in Barnstable. Samuel's son, 
Samuel Davis, Jr., grandfather of John II., 
was born in Barnstable, July 4, 1762, and 
moved with his parents to Gorham, Me., about 
1772. He was a land-owner in Gorham until 
1S03, when he removed to Standish, buying a 
tract of wild land containing ninety-five acres, 
from which he redeemed a homestead. He 
was a strong, energetic man, and cleared a 
good farm, doing a large part of the cutting of 
the timber himself. He was a soldier of the 
Revolution, and drew a pension until his 
death, in January, 1856, at the advanced age 
of ninety -three years. The family are some- 
what noted for their longevity, his children 
all living to be quite old, one daughter attain- 
ing the age of ninety-one years, while another 
lacked but three years of reaching the century 
mark. He and 'his wife, Mary Skillins, 
daughter of Levi Skillins, of Cape Cod, be- 
came the parents of sixteen children, Isaac 
being the fourth child and the eldest son. 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Davis, Jr., were mem- 
bers of the Congregational church, while 
he was a Whig in politics. 

Isaac Davis was born March 13, 1790, in 
Gorham, and was a lad of thirteen years when 
he came to Standish to live. He commenced 
teaming when a young man, carrying goods 
from Standish to Portland, but later in life 
turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, 
continuing thus employed until his demise in 
1.S67, on September 15. His first wife, 
Hadassah Shaw, daughter of Thomas Shaw, of 
this town, bore him three children, two of 
whom are now living; namely, Daniel S. and 
Levi S. The latter married Mary, daughter 
of Theodore Hutchins, of Standish, and has 
two children — Joshua H. and Abbic S. 
Amos S. Davis, eldest son of Isaac and 
Hadassah Davis, married Apphia D., daugh- 
ter of Asa Cobb, of Westbrook, Me. They 
had eight children, seven of whom are living. 



Amos S. was a soldier in the war of the Re- 
bellion. He died in July, 1882. 

Mr. Isaac Davis's second wife, Abigail 
Whitney, daughter of Joshua Whitney, of 
Buxton, Me., bore him three children, as fid- 
lows: Emily D., Mrs. John Hooper, a widow, 
who has four children living — Jason C, 
Emma F., Georgia, and Lillian; John II.; 
and Joshua W. The father was a Democrat 
in politics, and both he and his wife were 
liberal in religion. Joshua W. Davis, young- 
est son of Isaac and Abigail Davis, was an 
officer in Company L, Tenth New York Cav- 
alry, and served throughout the war. After 
the war he married, and has since lived in 
Chicago, 111. 

John H. Davis was brought up and educated 
in the town of his birth, and on the home farm 
acquired a practical knowledge of agriculture. 
On leaving school he learned the carpenter's 
trade, at which he worked several years. He 
is now devoting himself principally to his 
farm, which consists of forty acres, and yields 
him excellent crops. Mr. Davis is a steadfast 
Democrat, popular with his party and promi- 
nent in town matters. In 1879 he was 
elected Selectman of the town, and served ac- 
ceptably two years. He has since for several 
terms faithfully filled the positions of Town 
Clerk and Town Treasurer. Socially, he is a 
Master Mason, belonging to Standish Lodge, 
No. 70, A. F. & A. M., of which he has been 
Master three years, besides holding minor 
offices. 

On December 22, 1873, Mr. Davis was 
united in marriage with Alinda Shaw, daugh- 
ter of Daniel Shaw, of this town. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Davis arc liberal in their religious 
views. 




ON. WILLIAM WIDGERY 
THOMAS, whose portrait appears 
on a neighboring page of this vol- 
ume, was born in Portland, Me., 
November 7, 1803, and is therefore now 
(1896) in his ninety-third year. He is a di- 
rect descendant in the eighth generation of 
George Cleeve, the first settler on the Neck, 
now Portland, and includes in his ancestry the 
Rev. George Burroughs, a graduate of Harvard 



'94 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



College and an early preacher in Falmouth, 
and John Proctor, both of whom were victims 
of the witchcraft delusion in Salem, Mass. 

Mr. Thomas's father, Elias Thomas, was 
born in Portland, January 14, 1772. In early 
manhood he engaged in mercantile pursuits, 
and in 1823 was Treasurer of the State of 
Maine, which office he held for seven years. 
He was also a Director of the Cumberland 
Hank. He died in Portland after a long, use- 
ful, and honorable life, at his home, corner of 
State and Danforth Streets, August 3, 1872. 
aged one hundred years and six months. The 
Thomas Block on Commercial Street was 
named in his honor. 

Mr. Thomas's mother, Elizabeth Widgery, 
was the daughter of the Hon. William Widgery. 
She was married to Elias Thomas in 1801, 
and died in Portland in July, 1861, at the age 
of eighty three years, greatly beloved and re- 
spected. Her father, the Hon. William Widg- 
ery, died in Portland in 1822 at the age of 
seventy years. In 1788 he was elected dele- 
gate to the Massachusetts Convention which 
adopted the Constitution of the United States. 
He was chosen in 1787 the Representative 
from New Gloucester to the General Court of 
Massachusetts, which office he held by virtue 
of repeated elections for eight years. In 1794 
he was elected Senator to the Legislature of 
the State of Massachusetts from Cumberland 
County. He was chosen Representative to 
Congress in 18 10 from Cumberland district, 
and earnestly supported the measures of Presi- 
dent Madison's administration, casting his 
vote in favor of commencing hostilities against 
Great Britain in the War of 181 2, though 
against the wishes of his constituents. 

A gentleman, in writing of Mr. Widgery 
to a friend in this city says, "Mr. Widgery was 
in Congress a moral hero, proving himself a 
man of moral firmness and unbending integrity 
and self-sacrificing patriotism by taking on 
himself the memorable position and dangerous 
responsibility of voting against the expressed 
will of his constituents for a hazardous and 
unequal war, with the best part of his wealth 
(his shipping) uninsured, on the ocean, while 
his town property, just recovering from the 
desolation of the embargo, worse for the infant 
seaport than the war, must become unproduc- 



tive, furnishing his declining years with a 
precarious support, while he would have to 
buffet the storm of popular indignation, which 
he did." 

Widgery Block on Exchange Street was 
named in honor of his memory, and is on the 
site of his former residence. 

At an early age Mr. Thomas became a clerk 
in a dry-goods store, located near the site of 
the Cumberland Bank on ICxchange Street, 
and in 1822, when not epiite nineteen years 
old, went into the dry-goods business for him- 
self on the north-easterly side of that street, 
on the site now occupied by the First National 
Bank. He left this business in 1835 after a 
successful career, and has been actively en- 
gaged in various pursuits, as merchant, 
banker, and real estate owner up to the pres- 
ent time. He has been for many years one 
of the largest real estate owners in Portland, 
and to him the city is indebted for many 
of the substantial buildings which adorn its 
streets. 

Mr. Thomas was married March 5, 1835, to 
Elizabeth White Goddard, who was born in 
Portsmouth, May 25, 1812, daughter of Henry 
Goddard, for many years a merchant in Port- 
land. Mrs. Thomas died in Portland, April 
27, 1884, lamented by all who knew her, be- 
loved for her many virtues. Of Mr. Thomas's 
children there are living: General Henry G. 
Thomas, United States Army; William Widg- 
ery Thomas, Jr., ex-Minister to Sweden and 
Norway (see sketch published elsewhere in 
this volume); and Elias Thomas, merchant. 

Mr. Thomas represented the city of Port- 
land at Augusta as a member of the House in 
1855 and of the Senate in 1856. He was 
elected State Treasurer in i860, but declined 
to serve. He has been a member of both 
branches of the city government, and is, per- 
haps, best known as the first war Mayor, in 
1 861 and 1862, when he was very active in his 
support of the I 7 ederal authority and in caring 
for the soldiers and their families. He was a 
friend of Edwin Stanton, Lincoln's famous 
Secretary of War, and named a block on Ex- 
change Street "Stanton Block" in his honor. 
He was for twenty years one of the Board of 
Overseers of Bowdoin College and for more 
than thirty years a corporate member of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



•95 



American Board of Commissioners of Foreign 
Missions, both of which places he resigned on 
account of increasing years. He has been one 
of the managers of the Portland Benevolent 
Society for more than thirty years, and Presi- 
dent for more than twenty years, which posi- 
tion he still holds. He is a Director of the 
Maine General Hospital, which place he has 
held for more than twenty years. He was 
elected in October, 1836, a Director of the 
Canal Bank, then a State bank, and in 1849 
its President, to which position he has been 
annually elected ever since, and has, therefore, 
been a Director of the bank sixty years and 
its President for forty-seven years. He still 
daily attends to the duties of the office. 

In 1876 Mr. Thomas was chosen one of the 
Presidential electors at large, and at the meet- 
ing; of the State electors at Augusta was made 
President of the Electoral College of Maine. 
He voted in favor of the election of Mr. 
Hayes. 

Mr. Thomas, Neal Dow, W. D. Little, and 
others organized in 1S27 the Portland Tem- 
perance Society, which was one of the earliest 
temperance societies in the State; and he has 
now in his possession the Secretary's book, 
containing the preamble and a long list of 
signers, among them some very prominent 
names. He has always been an earnest sup- 
porter of the cause of temperance, and has 
never used intoxicating drinks or tobacco in 
any form during his long life. In 1827 Mr. 
Thomas united with the Second Parish Con- 
gregational Church, Dr. Payson, pastor, and 
is now the oldest living member. 

For seventy-four years Mr. Thomas has 
taken an active part in the business life of his 
native city. In the course of this long busi- 
ness career he has accumulated a large fort- 
une; but he has acquired every dollar of it by 
fair, open, and honorable dealing. He has 
also ever been a cheerful giver. As his fort- 
une has increased, so also have his benefac- 
tions. Many are the institutions that have 
been helped, and hundreds the homes that 
have been brightened by the largess of his 
hand and the benediction of his heart. 

Mr. Thomas is to-day the oldest merchant 
and banker, and he is also the most venerable 
and highly respected citizen of Portland. So 



true are the words of ancient Scripture, "The 
hoary head is a crown of glory if it be found 
in the way of righteousness." 



EDWARD W. DOLLOFF, Deputy Sheriff 
P of the County of Cumberland, Me., is 
-^ — a native of Standish, the date of his 

birth being October 14, 1857. His grand- 
father, William Dolloff, was for many years 
a farmer in Carroll County, New Hampshire, 
living in the towns of Jackson and Bartlett. 
In 1850 he came to Maine, purchasing a farm 
of seventy-five acres in Standish, where he car- 
ried on general husbandry until his death, at 
the age of fifty-six years. He married Lucy 
Nute, of Jackson, N.H.; and they became the 
parents of four children, two of whom are now 
living — Geneva and Charles. Geneva Dolloff 
is the wife of Almon Marean, of Standish, and 
has five children — Fred, Albert O., Theodore 
B., Walter E., and Robie C. Charles Dolloff 
married Julia Cousins, and has six children - 
Lottie, Lucy, William, Almeda, Annie, and 
Henry. Grandfather Dolloff was a sound 
Democrat in politics, and he and his wife at- 
tended the Baptist church. 

William Dolloff, Jr., son of William and 
Lucy, and father of Edward W., was the eldest 
child of the grandfather's family, his birth 
having occurred in New Hampshire, January 
11, 1 83 1 . In his early manhood he was em- 
ployed in driving a team from Cornish to Port- 
land, taking three days to make the round 
trip, afterward changing his route from Stand- 
ish to Portland, being engaged in this business 
some five years. He then learned the cooper's 
trade, which he followed in Standish fifteen 
years, when he settled on the farm that he had 
previously bought. After the death of his 
first wife he sold his farm, and removed to 
Gorham, going into trade with Fred Marean, 
under the firm name of Dolloff & Marean, con- 
ducting a general store for three years. Dis- 
posing of his business, he then went to North 
Windham, and there engaged in agricultural 
pursuits until his demise in 1893. He was 
twice married. His first wife, Ann M. 
Warren, of Standish, whom he espoused Janu- 
ary 11, 1857, died in 1884, leaving two chil- 
dren—Edward W. and Hattie M., the latter, 



196 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born September 2, 1865, being now the wife 
of Horace Buzzell, of Portland. The father 
and mother were members of the Orthodox 
church. After the death of his first wife 
William Dolloff married Mrs. Martha (Man- 
chester) York. Jn politics he was a steadfast 
Republican. 

Edward W. Dolloff acquired his elementary 
education in the place of his nativity, after- 
ward completing his course of study at the 
Portland Business College. In 1879 nc 
started West to seek his fortune, going to 
California, where he worked two years for the 
North Beach & Mission Railway Company. 
Returning in 18S1 to Standish, Mr. Dolloff 
began coopering, and a year and a half later 
purchased a farm of forty acres, carrying it on 
two years. Then selling his farm, he re- 
moved to Michigan, but did not stay there 
very long. Again coming to his native town, 
he resumed work at coopering, continuing 
until 1887, when he bought a half-interest in 
the general store of William H. Libby, with 
whom he remained in partnership three years. 
In 1890 he bought out Mr. Libby; and he has 
since conducted the business alone, having in 
the mean time built up an extensive and profit- 
able local trade. 

In politics Mr. Dolloff is an earnest sup- 
porter of the principles of the Republican 
party, and has been prominent in town affairs, 
serving most acceptably in various offices of 
importance. He was Selectman of Standish 
in 1 891 and 1892, being Chairman of the 
Board the last year; ami in 1894 he was 
elected Town Clerk and Treasurer, offices to 
which he was re-elected the following year, 
and re-elected again this year for 1896. In 
1895 he was appointed to his present position 
of Deputy Sheriff. Socially, he is a member 
of Crescent Lodge, No. 20, Knights of 
Pythias, of Steep Falls, Standish, and Knights 
of Honor, No. 3333, Watchic Lodge. 

Mr. Dolloff was married October 12, 1882, 
to Addic J., daughter of Wesley Spear, of 
this town. They have four children, namely: 
Harold W., born March 25, 1884; Ethel M., 
born March 11, 1S86; and Orin P., born July 
13, 1S90; and Philip I 7 .., born January 20, 
1896. Mrs. Dolloff is a conscientious mem- 
ber of the Congregational church. 



^CnO/lLLIAM HKI 

VsV who conduct 

*"» *""» cessfullv in 



ENRY BLANCHARD, 
icts general farming suc- 
cessfully in North Yarmouth, Me., 
was born in Pittsfield, Somerset County, in 
this State, November 18, 1832, son of Reuben 
and Mary E. (Johnson) Blanchard. Mr. 
Blanchard s great-grandfather, Joshua Blanch- 
ard, was one of the very first settlers in North 
Yarmouth: and his grandfather, William 
Blanchard, was a lifelong resident of this 
town. He was a successful farmer, owning a 
good farm ; and he was a worthy and esteemed 
member of the community. He died at the 
age of seventy-four, and his wife lived to 
reach the age of eighty years. Their family 
consisted of five children, four of whom lived 
to attain a good age. 

Reuben Blanchard was born upon the farm 
where his son William Henry now lives, and 
at an early age he engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. He succeeded to the ownership of 
the property, upon which he continued to re- 
side; and he always maintained a comfortable 
prosperity, being a good practical, industrious 
farmer. His death took place in 1864, at the 
age of fifty-eight years. He was a Republican 
in politics. His wife, Mary E. Johnson, who 
was a native of North Yarmouth, became the 
mother of four sons and two daughters, and of 
these two are now living, namely: William 
Henry, the subject of this sketch, who is the 
elder; and Payson N., a prosperous farmer, of 
Cumberland. The others were: Emma, Mar) 
F., and Albert A. Mrs. Mary E. Blanchard 
died November 7, 1877. Mr. Blanchard's 
parents were members of the Congregationnl 
church. 

William Henry Blanchard acquired his ele- 
mentary education in the common schools of 
North Yarmouth, and pursued more advanced 
studies at the academy. He grew to manhood 
upon the home farm; and at the age of twenty 
he began to learn the trade of a mason, which 
he followed as an occupation steadily for 
twelve years. He then made three voyage's as 
a sailor, and, returning, finally settled upon 
the home farm, which he now owns and occu- 
pies. His property contains one hundred 
acres of land, which he has greatly improved 
by judicious management; and he conducts 
general fanning .with satisfactory results. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



»97 



On January i, 1870, Mr. Blanchard was 
married to Emma H. Howe, who was born in 
Boston, Mass., December 25, 1843, daughter 
of Enos and Martha (Libbie) Howe. Mr. and 
Mrs. Blanchard have had three children, 
namely : Cora Mayne, who was born January 
27, 1S71, and is now residing in North Yar- 
mouth; Albert L., who was born November 1, 
1875, and died in North Yarmouth on Febru- 
ary 1, 1896; and Selden F., who was born 
May 28, 1S79, arR l died January 17, 1888. 

Mr. Blanchard is a representative of one of 
the oldest families in his part of the town, and 
is well and favorably known as an energetic 
farmer and a kind-hearted neighbor. He sup- 
ports the Republican party in politics, and at- 
tends the Congregational church, of which 
Mrs. Blanchard is a member. 



njzFKIEL JORDAN SYLVESTER, a 
R prominent resident of Otisfield, in the 
'^- ■ - extreme northern part of Cumberland 
County, was born in Casco, Me., October 8, 
1823, son of Zadoc and Mary (Jordan) Sylves- 
ter. The family is well known in Cumber- 
land County, and Mr. Sylvester traces his 
ancestors back for seven generations. 

Zadoc Sylvester was a native and lifelong 
resident of Casco, where he followed the trade 
of a carpenter in connection with farming dur- 
ing the active period of his life, and where he 
died in 1879. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Mary Jordan, was born in Casco. They 
were the parents of five children, as follows: 
Martha A., who married Charles Perkins, of 
Vermont, and is no longer living; George B., 
late a carpenter and contractor of Lowell, 
Mass., who married Nancy R. Howard, and 
died October 8, 1894; Ezekiel J., the subject 
of this sketch; Zadoc, who married a Miss 
Lagro, and lives in Windham, Me. ; and 
Eliphalet, his twin brother, who married a 
Miss Robinson, and is now residing in Loui- 
siana. The mother died in 1825. 

Ezekiel Jordan Sylvester had the misfortune 
to lose his mother when he was but two years 
old, and he resided with his father and friends 
in Casco until he reached the age of eight. 
After spending a short time with an aunt in 
Bridgton, he lived with his uncle in Turner 



for two years, and at the age of eleven came 
to Otisfield, where he found a home in the 
family of Joseph M. Knight, with whom he 
remained until he was nineteen. He then 
went to Lowell, Mass., and entered the em- 
ploy of the Lawrence Manufacturing Com- 
pany, continuing there for seventeen years, 
and for a number of years was overseer of 
weaving. His health becoming impaired, he 
returned to Cumberland County, and settled 
upon his present farm in Otisfield. He en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits with energy, 
making the best of his means and opportuni- 
ties; and in 1855 he purchased the property, 
which consists of one hundred and twenty-five 
acres of productive land, upon which he has 
made all the improvements. Of late years he 
has devoted special attention to the cultiva- 
tion of fruit, onions, hay, and grain, with 
gratifying success. He was formerly quite an 
extensive stock raiser, but has relinquished 
that branch of agriculture. 

He was originally a Whig in politics, but 
since the formation of the Republican party 
has zealously supported its principles, and was 
for many years a political leader in his local- 
ity. He has served with ability as a member 
of the Board of Selectmen, has been Town 
Agent and Constable for the town, and has 
acted as a Justice of the Peace, and of the 
Quorum for twenty years, being still in office, 
in his seventy-third year. 

On November 15, 1846, Mr. Sylvester was 
united in marriage with Mariam T. Sargent, 
who was born in Strafford, Vt., May 18, 1S23. 
Mrs. Sylvester's parents, Robert and Lucinda 
(Tuttle) Sargent, who are no longer living, 
were natives of Vermont, and always resided 
in that State, the former a blacksmith and 
farmer by occupation. Mr. and Mrs. Sylves- 
ter have one son, Herbert Milton, who was 
born February 20, 1849, an ^ ' s now an attorney 
and counse!lor-at-law in Boston. He mar- 
ried Clara M. Elder, of Portland, August 5, 
1872, and has one son, named Robert Elder, 
who is now in his office. Herbert M. Sylves- 
ter is a successful lawyer and a prominent 
Mason, having advanced to the thirty-second 
degree. Mr. Sylvester is a self-made man, 
his prosperity as here shown being due to his 
own unaided exertions. He is a charter mem- 



igS 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ber of Crooked River Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; 
and both he and his wife are united with the 
Congregational church, of which for a number 
of years he was clerk. 




/ I L L I A M HALEY. Among the 
prominent residents of Sebago, 
Cumberland County, Me., is Will- 
iam Haley, who is well and favorably known 
for his able service in the public affairs of the 
town as a member of the Board of Selectmen 
and of the School Board. His residence in 
Sebago dates from his birth, which took place 
July 2, 1825. 

He was named for his father, William 
Haley, St\, who followed the trade of a black- 
smith in connection with farming, and was 
known as an energetic, industrious man and 
a worthy citizen. His wife, Mary Johnson, 
became the mother of eleven children, eight 
of whom lived to reach maturity. 

William Haley, son of William and Mary 
(Johnson) Haley, attended the schools of his 
native town in his early years; and after fin- 
ishing his studies he assisted in conducting 
the farm, also working with his father in the 
smithy. He remained at home until his mar- 
riage, when he settled upon a farm formerly 
owned by his wife's father, and applied him- 
self steadily to agricultural pursuits for some 
years. On December 30, 1863, he enlisted as 
a private in Company I, Thirtieth Regiment, 
Maine Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered 
into the service of his country at Augusta. 
The regiment was ordered to join the Depart- 
ment of the Gulf at New Orleans; and Mr. 
Haley was among those who participated in 
military operations upon the Mississippi 
River, accompanying the regiment as far as 
Alexander, when he was sent to the hospital 
in New Orleans, where he was confined for two 
months. He was then given a furlough, dur- 
ing which he visited his home; and while he 
was there his leave of absence was extended 
one month. Upon reporting for duty he was 
ordered to rejoin his regiment in the Shenan- 
doah Valley; and he continued in active ser- 
vice until the close of the war, when he was 
mustered out with his company, August 20, 
1S65. Having completed an honorable term 



of service, he resumed his former occupation 
at the farm, and has continued to reside here. 
His property consists of one hundred and 
twenty-five acres of good land, which he de- 
votes to general farming; and by diligent ap- 
plication of his energies he has derived a good 
income therefrom. 

On May 14, 1S49, Mr. Haley was united in 
marriage with Miriam S. Pugsley, who was 
born upon this farm, her father, John Pugsley, 
having settled here in 1817, and made most of 
the improvements in the property. Mr. and 
Mrs. Haley have four children, as follows: 
Elzira, wife of O. A. Douglas; John F. ; 
Sarah D. ; and William W., the sons both re- 
siding at home. 

In local affairs Mr. Haley has always 
evinced a lively interest, and has rendered his 
share of service to the town whose welfare he 
guarded with ability for five years as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Selectmen. He also 
served upon the School Board for one year, 
and has in other ways proved his usefulness 
to the community. In politics he supports 
the Republican party. He is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity and a comrade of the 
Grand Army of the ■Republic. 




RANK A. LIBBY, an enterprising and 
progressive agriculturist of the town of 
Bridgton, was born December 28, 1845, 
in the town and county of Oxford, Me., being 
one of eight children, three sons and five 
daughters, born to Thomas and Nancy (Hil- 
bourne) Libby. Mr. Libby had the misfort- 
une when but five years old to lose his father 
by death. He continued to live with his 
mother until a boy of fourteen, when he left 
the district school, which he attended rather 
irregularly, in order to learn the blacksmith's 
trade. He worked at his trade until 1864, 
when, on September 6, he enlisted as a pri- 
vate in Company A, Thirtieth Maine Volun- 
teer Infantry. His regiment was ordered to 
Virginia, where it was stationed before Win- 
chester for some months, being afterward em- 
ployed to guard Washington, where Mr. 
Libby and his fellow-comrades remained until 
June, 1865. They then returned to Maine, 
and were mustered out of service at Lewiston. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



199 



Taking up once more the duties of civil 
life, Mr. Libby resumed his former occupation 
for a time, giving it up in November, 1S65, 
when he moved on to his present farm. The 
lot, which he at first purchased, consists of 
one hundred acres of rich and fertile land, 
which under his management yields bounti- 
fully of the crops common to this section of 
the country. He has since bought other real 
estate, his property including "two hundred 
and fifty acres of land, some of it being 
covered with valuable timber. In addition to 
general agriculture, he carries on an extensive 
lumber business, meeting with much success 
in all of his operations. Socially, Mr. Libby 
is a member of the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic; and, politically, he is a sturdy Democrat. 
In 1864 Mr. Libby was married to Miss Julia 
S. Morrison, a daughter of William A. and 
Malinda (Ingalls) Morrison, and sister of 
John Morrison, an account of whose life will 
be found elsewhere in this work. The union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Libby has been perfected by 
the birth of four children, as follows: George 
A., who married the only daughter of Joseph 
L. Parker, of Lovell, Me., a highly respected 
young lady; Linnie M., a graduate of Bridg- 
ton High School, class of 1887, and one of 
Bridgton's most successful school teachers; 
Warren S., a graduate of Shaw's Business 
College, now employed at George C. Shaw & 
Co. 's grocery store, Portland; and Myron L., 
the youngest of the family, who continues to 
live with his parents. 



rMAN M. CASTNER, proprietor 
f the West End Hotel, Portland, 
and Secretary of the G. F. Quinn 
Refrigerator Company, was born in 
Damariscotta, Me., September 24, i860, his 
parents being Joseph W. and Sarah (Mero) 
Castner. His father is now a resident of 
Damariscotta, where he follows the occupation 
of a spar-maker. He and his wife reared a 
family of six children, namely: Herman M., 
the subject of this sketch ; Laura, who mar- 
ried Kendall Dunbar; Frank, who is cashier 
at the West End Hotel; Edward; Helen; and 
Walter A., who is clerk at the hotel. 

Herman M. Castner received his education 



in the common and high schools of his native 
town; and, after completing his studies, he 
entered the grocery store of George W. Brown 
in Damariscotta as a clerk, remaining in that 
business for two years. He then served an 
apprenticeship at spar-making; and, after 
finishing his trade, he entered into partnership 
with his father in the manufacturing of spars, 
and continued in. the business for twelve 



years. 



He next engaged in the restaurant 



business, which he conducted for seven years; 
and during the years of 1890, 1891, and 1892 
he was quite largely interested in the ice busi- 
ness. In May, 1892, he acquired possession 
of the West End Hotel in Portland, which at 
that time contained but forty-three rooms, and 
was not in favor with the travelling public. 
His first day's receipts amounted to three dol- 
lars and seventy cents; but business rapidly 
improved under his capable management, and 
in 1894 he was obliged to build an addition to 
the hotel, which increased his capacity to one 
hundred and twenty-two rooms. The West 
End has become a favorite with travellers, 
being especially desirable on account of its 
close proximity to the Union Station. Mr. 
Castner has a farm of fifteen acres, which is 
situated just beyond the city limits; and here 
he keeps cattle, swine, and poultry, and raises 
farm products for his table, having on the 
place at the present time about one hundred 
and thirty-two hogs, five cows, three horses, 
and a large flock of hens. Aside from his 
hotel business he is interested in the G. F. 
Ouinn Refrigerator Company of Portland, 
being Secretary, Treasurer, and General 
Agent of that thriving concern. 

In politics Mr. Castner is a Republican, 
and has frequently been solicited to accept 
nominations to public office, but has been 
forced to decline, as his business interests 
demand his undivided attention. He is prom- 
inent in Masonic circles, being a member of 
Portland Commandery, and of Kora Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine of Lewiston, Me. 

He is an active and progressive young busi- 
ness man, a great favorite with the travellers 
who frequent his hostelry and highly es- 
teemed by his numerous friends and acquain- 
tances at home. Mr. Castner married Allura 
Sanborn, daughter of Dexter and Eliza San- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born; and she shares largely in her husband's 
popularity. 



B 



AVID P. SINNETT, of Bailey's 
Island, Harpswell, Me., grocer, boat 
^3 J builder, and wholesale dealer in fish, 
was born on this island, October 19, 
[843.. He is the son of Hugh and Margaret 
(Perry) Sinnett and grandson of James and 
Mary (Johnson) Sinnett, all lifelong residents 
of Harpswell. 

James Sinnett was born on Orr's Island, but 
resided for many years on Bailey's Island, 
where he was one of the pioneer settlers. Be- 
sides clearing and cultivating a farm, in the 
season for fishing he spent much of his time 
on the sea, obtaining large quantities of fish, 
which he cured and disposed of to good advan- 
tage. He lived to be ninety-two years of age. 
His wife, Mary Johnson, was the daughter of 
one of the original owners of Bailey's Island, 
her father and two others building the first 
houses here. She lived to be sixty-nine years 
of age, spending her life, from the time of her 
birth until she closed her eyes forever, on the 
island. 

Hugh Sinnett was one of the nine children 
born to James and Mary Sinnett. He learned 
to cure fish with his father when a boy, and in 
his mature manhood owned a number of fish- 
ing-vessels. He is yet living on Bailey's 
Island, which has been his home from the time 
of his birth, and at the advanced age of eighty- 
one is remarkably active, in full possession of 
all his faculties. Though exposed to all kinds 
of weather in the pursuit of his arduous call- 
in-, he has never known what it is to be ill; 
and his cheek to-day has the ruddy glow of 
perfect health. His wife Margaret is a daugh- 
ter of Captain David Perry, a native of 
Thomaston, Me., who also was a seafaring 
man, master of a vessel. Captain Perry died 
at the aye of thirty-five, leaving eight chil- 
dren, only one of whom, Mrs. Sinnett, is liv- 
ing to-day. She is eighty years of age, and, 
like her husband, is in perfect health and in 
possession of all her faculties. A remarkable 
couple, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Sinnett have 
lived together fifty-seven years, exempt from 
sickness. Alert and intelligent, they are fine 



types of a class which forms one of the pecul- 
iar features of the State of Maine — old 
people who know not the decrepitude of senil- 
ity. They attend the Union Church on the 
island. Two children only blessed their 
union — Charles N. and David P. Charles 
N. Sinnett, who is a Congregational minister, 
is at present settled in New Hampshire. 

David P. Sinnett received a good common- 
school education, and early acquired a knowl- 
edge of the fishing business, accompanying his 
father on fishing trips and aiding him in cur- 
ing the fish. About 1876 he purchased a 
store on Bailey's Island, about a quarter of a 
mile farther up the bay than his present loca- 
tion; and he was there successfully engaged 
in the grocery business seven years. He then 
built what is now known as Sinnett's Wharf, 
and started in the wholesale fish trade, buying 
from the fishermen of the locality and ship- 
ping large quantities to Portland, Boston, and 
New York. This venture also was a success. 
Some idea of the extent of his transactions 
maybe gained from the statement that in 1892 
he bought and sold three thousand quintals of 
fish. Mr. Sinnett's present store on Bailey's 
Island is stocked with a full line of groceries 
and with fishermen's supplies of all kinds. 
He is also engaged in boat building, produc- 
ing various kinds of boats for fishing and 
pleasure parties; and with all his other inter- 
ests he deals extensively in wood and coal. 

Mr. Sinnett was married in 1868 to Mary 
Alexander, daughter of Perry Alexander, a 
fisherman who was a native and lifelong resi- 
lient of Bailey's Island. Mrs. Sinnett died 
in 1886, at the age of forty-five, leaving three 
children — Chester, a fisherman, who married 
Jennie Stetson, of Auburn, Me.; Herbert P., 
in the same business, married to Bessie Baker, 
of Auburn, Me. ; and Maggie, who superin- 
tends her father's household. 

Politically, Mr. Sinnett is independent. 
Socially, he is a member of the Independent 
Order of Red Men and of the United Order 
of the Golden Cross, belonging to the Lodge 
of each of these societies on Orr's Island ; 
and in the Golden Cross Lodge he has held 
all the offices and been through all the chairs. 
He attends the Union Church on Bailey's 
Island. Gifted with rare intelligence and 



SH^B^ 












«*-• 




* 



/ 



DAVID P. S1NNETT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



203 



ability, Mr. Sinnett has the genial and hearty 
disposition that the sea seems to bestow upon 
its votaries, and is very popular on Orr's 
Island as well as on Bailey's Island, where 
his family has lived so long. 




^TEPHEN SCAM MAN, a citizen of 
South Portland (formerly Cape 
Elizabeth), is a native of Maine, 
having been born in Saco, York 
County, October 29, 183 1. He is a direct 
descendant in the sixth generation from Hum- 
phry Scamman, who was born about 1640, 
and was "accepted into the town of Saco as 
an inhabitant," June 12, 16S0. Humphry 
Scamman and his family were captured by the 
Indians in 1697, and kept prisoners in Canada 
until the close of King William's War, when 
he returned to Saco, where he died on Janu- 
ary 1, 1727. 

Freeman Scamman, the grandfather of 
Stephen, was a pioneer of Saco. He was 
born May 1, 1750, and was married June 2, 
1772, to Elizabeth Kimball, of Wells, this 
State. Very soon after their union they set- 
tled in Saco, taking up a large tract of heav- 
ily timbered land, which they partly cleared. 
he becoming one of the leading farmers of that 
locality. Their eleven children were born on 
the Saco homestead, Richard, Stephen's father, 
being the second child and the eldest son. 

Richard Scamman was a lifelong resident of 
Saco, and was numbered among the able and 
prosperous farmers and most prominent citi- 
zens of the community in which he lived and 
died. He was twice married. His first wife, 
Elizabeth Small, of Biddeford, with whom he 
was united on January 1, 1799, died March 1, 
1 8 14, leaving seven children, none of whom 
are now living. On March 13, 1815, he mar- 
ried Mrs. Mary Moon, nee Brown: and she 
also bore him seven children, two of whom 
have passed to the life immortal. The record 
of the others is as follows: Thomas M., born 
March 13, 1823, now a blacksmith in Yar- 
mouth, married Elizabeth M. Grant, and they 
have four children; Daniel F., of South Port- 
land, born August 7, 1826, married Martha J. 
Parsons, and they are the parents of two chil- 
dren; Stephen is the special subject of this 



sketch: Emily R., born December 2S, 183S, 
was married January 1, 1881, to John E. 
Small, who is a conductor on the Huston & 
Maine Railway, and resides at Portsmouth, 
N.H.; and Elizabeth, born January 5, 1817, 
is the widow of Albert Sawyer, of Saco, and 
has three children. 

On leaving the Saco schools, Stephen 
Scamman became a clerk for Ezra Scamman, 
who was engaged in the tracking business in 
Portland, continuing in that capacity until 
admitted to a partnership in the business, 
which was carried on successfully until i860. 
In that year Mr. Scamman established himself 
in the grocery business on Market Street, 
Portland, being senior member of the firm of 
Scamman & Colby. A short time afterward 
he sold his interest, and opened a store on 
Congress Street, where he remained until 
1868, when he disposed of that establishment 
in order to establish himself in business at 
Cape Elizabeth, where he had resided for 
eight years. Here, near the rolling-mills, 
he opened a store for the sale of groceries, 
in which he had an excellent trade until 
1875, when he sold out, and retired to his 
present homestead, and has since devoted his 
time to the care of his personal interests. 
He has been conspicuously identified with 
the affairs of the town during his residence 
here, serving with ability in various official 
capacities, including that of Selectman for 
nine consecutive years, from 1876 until 
1885; Town Treasurer during the years of 
1893 and 1895; and in 1887 representing 
his Democratic constituents in the State 
legislature. 

The maiden name of Mr. Scamman's wife, 
to whom he was married November 1, 1855, 
was Ellen S. Dyer. She was born in Port- 
land, December 22, 1S37, daughter of Nathan 
and Mercy Dyer. The home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Scamman has been brightened by the birth of 
five children. 




ERRANUS C. HANSON, after thirty 
years and more of city life, years of 
activity ami responsibility, has re- 
turned to the home of his boyhood, Windham, 
Me., and is here engaged in farming and lum- 



204 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



bering. He is a native of Cumberland 
County, having been born December 21, 1839, 
in Bridgton. 

His grandfather, Ezekiel Hanson, was an 
early settler of Windham, coming here when 
a young man, and buying one hundred acres of 
land, and engaging in mixed husbandry, living 
on his farm, which was located near Duck 
Pond until his demise at the age of eighty 
years. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Mary Plummer, bore him eleven children, five 
of them being sons; and of these Edmund, the 
third son, was the' father of Verranus. In 
polities Ezekiel Hanson was an old-time 
Whig, and both he and his wife attended the 
Congregational church. 

Edmund Hanson was born on the old home- 
stead in Windham, March 19, 1808, and, as 
soon as old enough, began working on the 
home farm. Some time later he removed to 
Bridgton, where he carried on farming until 
1S45, when he returned to the place of his 
birth, and here engaged in the livery business. 
lie died in 1884. In politics he was a strong 
Republican and an earnest worker for his 
party. He married in April, 1833, Rachel 
Smith, daughter of Daniel Smith. She was a 
native of Bridgton, born December 19, 181 3. 
They became the parents of six children, five 
of whom are now living — Franklin D., Newell 
P., Mary E., Verranus C, and Melvin H. 
Franklin D. Hanson, born September 13, 
1834, was twice married. His first wife, 
Loretta Hilton, of Bridgton, died, leaving one 
child, Annie; and his second wife, Alice 
Foster, of Sweden, Me., bore him five chil- 
dren-Minnie, Howard, Fred, Ethel, and 
Albert. Newell P. Hanson, born May 14, 
1836, married Charlotte Freeman, of Wind- 
ham, and has seven children, five being now 
living — Frank, Fred, Henry, George, and 
Howard. Mary E. Hanson, born April 11, 
1838, has been twice married, her first hus- 
band having been George Dennett, of Brown- 
field, and her last, Thomas Nelson. She has 
had two children, but one of whom, Charles 
Dennett, is now living. Melvin H., born 
October 11, 1851, married Hermie Jackman, 
of Portland, and has two children — Edmund 
and Bertha. The mother was a member of the 
Congregational church. 



Verranus C. Hanson was educated in Wind- 
ham. In early manhood he went to the city of 
Portland, where he learned the blacksmith's 
trade, at which he worked for eleven years. 
Going thence to Boston, Mass., he continued 
his trade in that city for five years; and on 
April 28, 1873, he was appointed on the city 
police force. He continued in active service 
until January 3, 1892, when lie was retired on 
a pension, which he will receive annually as 
long as he lives. On November 1, the same- 
year, Mr. Hanson returned to Windham, ami 
has since lived on his farm. A man of great 
energy and enterprise, in addition to general 
farming, he is engaged in the lumber, wood, 
and coal business, and on his farm has a cider- 
mill and a threshing machine, both of which 
he makes good use of in their seasons. In 
politics he is a steadfast Republican, support- 
ing the principles of his party by voice and 
vote. 

Mr. Hanson has been twice married. His 
first wife, Annie Crossman, of Portland, left 
two children — Andrew E. and Verranus C. 
On November 26, 1890, Mr. Hanson married 
his present wife, Edna Leavitt, daughter of 
Judge George Leavitt, of Machias, Me. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hanson are liberal in their religious 
views. 



AMES A. MILLIKEN, of Westbrook, 
Me., foreman of the Portland Wooden- 
ware Company's mills at Duck Pond, 
was born in the adjoining town of Scar- 
boro, May 7, 1852. His parents were Joseph 
L. and Mary (Goodrich) Milliken. His pa- 
ternal grandfather, Frederick R. Milliken, 
who was a practical farmer, was a Democrat 
in politics and a Methodist in religious belief. 
He was twice married, and by his first union 
had five children, two of whom — namely, John 
and Samuel — are still living. He married for 
his second wife Phebe Foss, and reared one 
son, Frederick, who still survives. 

Joseph L. Milliken, Mr. Milliken's father, 
was born in Scarboro, and in his early years 
there followed the trade of shipwright. Later 
in life he moved to Aroostook County, where 
he purchased a farm, and engaged in farming 
for several years. Afterward he returned to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



205 



his native town. He was an industrious and 
temperate man, leading a useful life. He 
was a supporter of the Democratic party, and 
had no religious preference. His wife, Mary 
Goodrich, became the mother of nine children, 
and, of these, three are living, namely: Fred 
W. ; Samuel K. ; and James A., the subject 
of this sketch. 

James A. Milliken received his education 
in the public schools of Scarboro and Wind- 
ham ; and when a young man he became a 
fireman on board one of the steamers plying 
between Portland and Boston. After being 
thus employed for two years, he went to the 
boiler works of Ouinn & Co., of Portland, 
where he remained for five years. For the 
next year and a half he worked at the Portland 
stove foundry; and he then became a partner 
in the Co-operative Stove Company of Port- 
land, which concern later moved to Biddeford, 
Me., where he remained in their employ for 
two years. He was next engaged in the 
foundry business in Massachusetts two years, 
at the expiration of which time he returned to 
Portland. Twelve years ago he became en- 
gineer at the Portland Woodenware Company's 
factory, a position which he ably filled for ten 
years ; and some two years since he was ad- 
vanced to the post of general foreman. The 
factory is situated at Duck Pond in West- 
brook, and employs from thirty-five to forty 
men, who are engaged in manufacturing pails 
and tubs in large quantities, producing an 
average of twelve hundred pails per clay, which 
rind a ready market in Boston, New York, and 
Philadelphia, their tubs being sold principally 
in Maine. 

Mr. Milliken was married to Rhoda Cannell, 
daughter of Heman Cannell, of Gorham, Me., 
in 1 87 1, and has had eight children, six of 
whom are living; namely, Maggie M., Daisy 
G., James R., Grace, Carrie, and Joseph C. 

Mr. Milliken is a thoroughly capable and 
reliable steam engineer, and his present posi- 
tion at the Portland company's factory bears 
testimony to his complete mastery of the busi- 
ness in which he has had so many years of ex- 
perience. He supports the principles of the 
Republican party in politics, and attends the 
Union Church, like his father having no relief- 
ions preference. 




ILLIAM T. STUDLFY, wholesale 
dealer in fish, 30 Commercial 
Street, Portland, was born on the 
island of Monhegan, Lincoln County, Me., 
January 2, 1828, son of William and Nancy 
(Trefetheren) Studley. William Studley was 
a prosperous farmer, and was also engaged to 
some extent in fishing. He died at the age of 
eighty-three years. His wife, Nancy Trefeth- 
eren, was the great-grand- daughter of Henry 
Trefetheren, originally from New Hampshire, 
who settled on the island of Monhegan, and 
became its sole proprietor. At his death he 
divided the island between his son and his 
two sons-in-law. William Studley and his 
wife were the parents of a large family, ten of 
whom grew to maturity. 

William T. Studley received a common- 
school education on the island, and worked for 
his father until of age, when he went to 
Gloucester, Mass., and engaged in the fishing 
business, remaining four or five mouths. 
While there he encountered many of the 
dangers that seem to lie in wait for Gloucester 
fishermen in particular, being lost once in a 
dory, but fortunately rescued by a fishing- 
vessel. Mr. Studley eventually returned to 
Monhegan, and was there engaged for some 
time in fishing with his father. In the fall of 
1866, a few months after the great fire in 
Portland, he removed to Cumberland County, 
taking up his residence in South Portland, 
where he has ever since made his home. 
During the next two years he was actively 
engaged in the fisheries, being Captain and 
owner of the "Moneda." In July, 1868, he 
sold his vessel anil fishing tackle, and opened 
the establishment on Commercial Wharf, of 
which he is now the proprietor, trading in salt 
and fresh fish, and shipping lobster to other 
ports. He has a large line of local custom, and 
also an extensive trade in New York City and 
State, his business having grown with the new- 
growth of the city. He is a plain business 
man, who has won success by the exercise of 
a thorough knowledge of his line of trade and 
honest dealing with all with whom he is asso- 
ciated. He has some financial interests out- 
side his regular business, and is now Presi- 
dent of the Loan and Building Association of 
South Portland. 



2 06 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mr. Studley and Lucy F. Pierce, of China, 
Me., daughter of Rufus and Nancy (Studley) 
Pierce, were married in October, 1852, and 
first kept house on Monhegan. Seven chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Studley, of 
whom four are living; namely, Charles A., 
Willie A., James E., and George W. The 
youngest son, George, is studying medicine 
in Portland, having completed a course of 
study at Bowdoin College. The three elder 
sons are in business with their father. 

In politics Mr. Studley is a Republican, 
and takes an active interest in public affairs, 
but is not an aspirant for office, his business 
cares engrossing his time and energy. He 
is a member of Ligonia Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, Portland, and of Mich- 
igan Encampment, and belongs to South 
Portland Lodge of Knights of Pythias, of 
which he was a charter member; and he was 
also a charter member of the Order of the 
Golden Cross. Mr. and Mrs. Studley are 
strong supporters of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of South Portland, to which they be- 
long, Mr. Studley having been on the church 
Hoard of Trustees for a number of years; and 
they are also interested in promoting the 
Christian religion in a broader sense. Mr. 
Studley is an ardent advocate of prohibition, 
and lives up to his principles, never using 
tobacco or any kind of intoxicating liquor. 
A man of high moral character, honest and 
progressive, he is a citizen of whom Portland 
may well be proud, the sort of man that makes 
the best fibre and sinew of the Commonwealth. 



rM. WILLIAM WIDGERY 
THOMAS, Jr., of Portland, Me., 
ex-Minister to Sweden and Norway, 
is a gentleman who has acquired 
distinction in the diplomatic service, and has 
won laurels as an author and public speaker. 
He is a son of the venerable Hon. William 
W. Thomas, Sr., of whom a special sketch 
with portrait and some account of his ancestry 
appears in this volume, and a brother of Gen- 
eral Henry G. Thomas, United States Army. 
On his mother's side he is descended from 
Dr. John Goddard, of New Hampshire, who 
declined a United States Senatorship. 



William W. Thomas, Jr., was born in Port- 
land, Me., in 1839. He received his earlier 
education in the public schools of this city, 
entered Bowdoin College in 1856, and was 
graduated with the highest honors in i860. 
During his college course, at the age of eigh- 
teen he taught a winter district school for 
three months and a half in a little red school- 
house near the shore of Cape Elizabeth. 

Immediately after graduation he commenced 
reading law, but in the spring of 1862 left 
his studies, and, as United States Bearer of 
Despatches, carried a treaty to Turkey. He 
became Vice-Consul-general at Constanti- 
nople, then Acting Consul at Galatz in the 
Principality of Moldavia, and before the close 
of the year was appointed by President Lin- 
coln one of the thirty "war consuls" of the 
United States, and sent to Gothenburg, 
Sweden. For his services as Consul he re- 
ceived from Secretary William II . Seward 
"the special thanks of the Department of 
State." Resigning his Consulship, he re- 
turned to America in the autumn of 1865, 
was admitted to the bar in 1866, and at once 
won distinction as an advocate. 

Mr. Thomas, during his three years' resi- 
dence in Sweden, acquired the Swedish lan- 
guage, and became familiar with the history, 
manners, and customs of the people. On his 
return to his native land he persistently ad- 
vocated Swedish immigration to Maine, and 
presented the first definite, practical plan for 
the purpose. The legisjature of 1870 passed 
an act authorizing this plan to be tried. Mr. 
Thomas, receiving the appointment of Com- 
missioner of Immigration, proceeded to carry 
it into effect. He visited Sweden, recruited a 
colony of fifty-one Swedes, sailed with them 
over the ocean, led them up the St. John 
River in flatboats, and on July 23, 1870, 
founded the prosperous settlement of New 
Sweden in the primeval forest of his native 
State. Here he lived in a log cabin with his 
Swedish pioneers for the better portion of four 
years, directing all the affairs of the colony 
until its success was assured. The colony 
has rapidly increased, and has constantly at- 
tracted Swedish immigration into Maine and 
the other New England States. In 1895 
Maine's Swedish colony numbered fifteen 



f 



r* 



ir^ 




WILLIAM WIDGERY THOMAS. JR. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



209 



hundred souls, owning real and personal prop- 
erty worth three-quarters of a million dollars, 
while fifteen hundred more Swedish immi- 
grants were settled in other parts of the State. 
New Sweden appropriately celebrated the de- 
cennial and the quarter-centennial anniversa- 
ries of its settlement, and on both occasions 
Mr. Thomas was the orator of the day. 

The city of Portland elected Mr. Thomas a 
member of the Maine legislatures of 1873, 
1874, and 1875. In the first session he made 
his mark as an ahle and courageous debater, 
and in the two later sessions he presided over 
the House as Speaker. He was also Senator 
from Cumberland County in 1879, but de- 
clined a renomination. In 1875 he was Presi- 
dent of the Maine State Republican Conven- 
tion, and in 1880 a delegate to the memorable 
Republican National Convention at Chicago, 
which nominated General Garfield for the 
Presidency. On July 4, 1883, he delivered 
the oration at the quarter-millennial celebra- 
tion of the founding of Portland by his own 
ancestor, Cleeve. Mr. Thomas had already 
been appointed Minister Resident to Sweden 
and Norway; and on July 19, the eve of his 
departure for his foreign post of duty, the 
sympathy and good will of his fellow-citizens 
found expression in a public dinner given to 
him under the auspices of the Cumberland 
bar and the merchants of Portland. 

Mr. Thomas resided at Stockholm as Amer- 
ican Minister until the close of President 
Arthur's administration in 1885. He was the 
first Minister to Sweden to address the King 
in his own language, the first to hoist the 
American flag at Stockholm, and the first to 
effectively assist in starting a line of direct 
steamships between Sweden and the United 
States. 

On leaving the Northland, Mr. Thomas was 
honored by a public farewell banquet given 
him by many of the first citizens of the Swed- 
ish capital at the Pavilion of Hasselbacken in 
the Royal Deer Park. The Pavilion was 
decorated with American flags, and- the band 
of the Royal Second Life Guards played 
American national airs. 

In 1887 he again visited Sweden, and mar- 
ried Dagmar Elizabeth, daughter of Ragnar 
Tornebladh, Knight and Nobleman, Member 



of the Upper House of the Swedish Parlia- 
ment, and Manager of The National Bank of 
the Kingdom of Sweden. The year after, 
Mr. Thomas was orator at the great Swedish 
celebration at Minneapolis, where more than 
forty thousand Swedes assembled to commem- 
orate the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary 
of the first Swedish settlement in America, 
New Sweden on the Delaware, founded by 
Gustavus Adolphus. This was the largest 
gathering of the Swedish race that has ever 
taken place on the American continent. 

In March, 1889, Mr. Thomas was appointed 
by President Harrison Envoy Extraordinary 
and Minister Plenipotentiary to Sweden and 
Norway. He and his young Swedish wife 
were welcomed back to the Northland with 
distinguished honors by both King and people. 
During his second term he helped secure the 
appointment of a Swedish jurist as Chief Jus- 
tice of Samoa under the Treaty of Berlin, and 
a Norwegian statesman as member of the Trib- 
unal of Arbitration between the United States 
and Great Britain on the question of the fur- 
seal fisheries in Behring Sea. On September 
14, 1 S90, on the deck of the American man- 
of-war "Baltimore," lying in the harbor of 
Stockholm, Minister Thomas, in an eloquent 
address, delivered the honored ashes of the 
great Swedish-American, John Ericsson, to 
the King and people of Sweden. 

During Mr. Thomas's second term a freer 
market for American products was opened in 
Sweden, the Riksdag voting in 1892 to reduce 
the duties on both grain and pork by one-half. 
It was at his own suggestion, made to the De- 
partment of State in 1890, that Mr. Thomas 
received instructions under which he com- 
menced negotiations with the governments of 
the United Kingdoms that resulted in the 
full and satisfactory extradition treaties of 
1893 between the United States and both 
Sweden and Norway. 

Mr. Thomas is an attractive public speaker, 
and from the political "stump" or lecture plat- 
form has addressed large audiences in nearly 
all the Northern States in both the English 
and Swedish languages. He is also widely 
known as an entertaining writer. He pub- 
lished in 1869 a translation of an historical 
novel, "The Last Athenian," from the Swed- 



2 10 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ish of Victor Rydberg, for which he received 
the special thanks of the King of Sweden and 
Norway; and he has written many spirited 
articles for Harper's Monthly, the Cosmopoli- 
tan, and other magazines and periodicals. His 
greatest literary work, however, is "Sweden 
and the Swedes," a richly illustrated volume 
of seven hundred and fifty pages, published in 
1892 in both America and Sweden, printed in 
both the English and Swedish languages. 
This book has met with a flattering reception 
and large sales on both sides the Atlantic, and 
is characterized by the Swedish press as "the 
most correct and at the same time the most 
genial description of Sweden and its people 
ever published in any language." 

Mr. Thomas is a keen follower of the chase 
and a lover of all outdoor manly sports. He 
has laid low the bear in the backwoods of 
Canada and the elk in the forests of Sweden. 
On September 29, 1893, when hunting in 
company with the Emperor of Germany and 
King Oscar on Hunnebcrg Mountain in 
Sweden, Mr. Thomas had the good luck to 
shoot four noble elk, as large and grand as the 
moose of America. During this hunt Em- 
peror William was exceedingly gracious 
toward the American Minister, frequently 
chatting and jesting with him in the most un- 
conventional and democratic manner; and soon 
alter his return to Berlin the Emperor sent to 
Mr. Thomas his portrait "as" (to use the Em- 
peror's own words) "a token of special sym- 
pathy and a souvenir of the personal meeting 
with you on the Hunnebcrg hunt." The 
painting is inscribed by the Emperor's own 
hand, " Wilhelm, Imperator Rex." 

Mr. Thomas was recalled from the Swedish 
and Norwegian mission by President Cleve- 
land in 1894. At a farewell audience Mr. 
Thomas was presented by King Oscar with his 
portrait, a magnificent life-size painting, per- 
sonally inscribed by the King. On his return 
tn America in October, he was welcomed back 
to his native land by a public reception and 
banquet, given in his honor by the leading 
Swedish-Americans of the State of New York 
at the house of the Swedish Engineers' Club 
in Brooklyn. 

During the winter of 1894-95 he delivered 
addresses upon "Sweden and the Swedes" in 



more than fifty cities and towns, in sixteen 
different States of the Union. He was every- 
where greeted by large and enthusiastic 
audiences, frequently numbering several thou- 
sands. In many cities he was honored by 
public receptions and banquets, United States 
Senators and Governors of States presided at 
his meetings, and his entire lecture tour from 
the Atlantic to the Rocky Mountains was one 
continued ovation. 

Of Mr. Thomas it can with truth be said 
that no other native American ever acquired 
so intimate a knowledge of Sweden and the 
Swedes. None ever accomplished so much by 
both tongue and pen in making Sweden and 
the Swedes known and honored throughout 
America, and none is more widely known or 
more highly respected by the Swedes in both 
the Old World and the New. 

Mr. Thomas is a member of the Maine His- 
torical Society, the Swedish Geographical So- 
ciety, His Majesty King Oscar's Shooting 
Club, the Royal Swedish Yacht Club, the 
Idun (a Swedish literary club), the Portland 
Fraternity Club, and he was one of the 
founders of the Portland Yacht Club. 

Mr. Thomas has led a life of many-sided ac- 
tivity and of honorable achievement. Though 
but of middle age, he has been lawyer, legis- 
lator, founder of a community, Consul, dip- 
lomat, orator, and author: and in all he has 
been a success. He has contributed to the 
common weal, and has been an important 
factor in social advancement. 

An excellent portrait of this practical hu- 
manitarian may be seen on a preceding page. 



fEON L. HALE, M.D., an active prac- 
titioner of medicine, surgery, and 
^^ dental surgery on Chebeague Island, 
in the town of Cumberland, Me., 
was born in Westbrook, Cumberland County, 
June 26, 1S54. He is of Colonial stock, 
whose progenitor came to this country from 
England at an early period, and settled in Es- 
sex County, Massachusetts. A more extended 
notice of the immigrant ancestor may be found 
in the "History of Newburyport, Mass." 

Nathaniel Hale, Dr. Hale's great-grand- 
father, came to Portland from Newburyport 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



some time previous to 1775, as he is men- 
tioned in Willis's "History of Portland" as 
one of those who lost property in that year by 
the British at the time that Portland was 
bombarded by Captain Mowatt. Nathaniel 
Hale was born in 1744, and died April 23, 
1808. His wife, Mary Lawrence, only child 
of Joshua and Sarah Lawrence (the former of 
whom was born in 1719, and died in 1802, 
and the latter born in 1 73 1, and died in 
1783), was born in 1752, and died October 
10, 1820. They were the parents of nine 
children, as follows, all natives of West- 
brook, Me.: Joseph, born May 29, 1773, died 
October 2, 1803; Polly, born February 21, 
1775; Sarah, born February 19, 1778, died 
December 23, 17S0; Sarah, born November 
27, 1780, died November 21, 1786; Nathan- 
iel, born May 23, 1783; Anna, born May 3, 
[786; Phebe, born January 2, 17S8; George 
(grandfather of Dr. Hale), born July 15, 
1793, died July 15, 1S50; Louisa, born No- 
vember 9, 1795, died December 21, 1820. 

After being burned out by the British, Na- 
thaniel Hale, with his wife and the Law- 
rences, went to Westbrook, near Pride's 
Corner, where he bought a large tract of land, 
now consisting of several farms, upon which 
they built and kept an inn for many years, or 
till he died. His son George then came into 
possession .of the estate and business. The 
elder son of George Hale now still retains 
about one hundred acres of the original home- 
stead. George Hale was in the War of 1812- 
14, holding the rank of Captain in Colonel 
Hobbs's regiment. On January 18, 18 16, he 
married Martha Roberts, daughter of James 
Roberts, whose wife was a Cushman. Then- 
children were eight in number, as follows, all 
born at the old Hale homestead: Alpheus, 
born . May 21, 1817, living, unmarried; Na- 
thaniel, born October 24, 18 19, married 
Lovina Knight; George R. (father of the sub- 
ject of this sketch), born December 14, 1821, 
died August 26, 1862; Louisa, born March 
10, 1824, married Abial Cutter, of West- 
brook, and died in October, 1864; Josiah, 
born November 16, 1827, now living, mar- 
ried Harriet White, of Gorham, Me. ; Sabra, 
born February 15, 1830, married Horace 
Pride of Westbrook, and died in September, 



1863; Martha, born April 8, 1S34, married 
Jason Leighton, of Falmouth, Me.; Phebe, 
born February 2, 1838, married Charles Pride, 
of Westbrook. 

George R. Hale, when a young man, went to 
New Hampshire, and learned the trade of a 
shoemaker, at which he continued to work for 
a while. On April 3, 1853, he married Lucy 
K. Gammon, of Westbrook, daughter of 
Stephen and Sarah (Knight) Gammon; and 
soon after he became engaged in the wholesale 
beef business, finding a market mostly in those 
clays in Portland and Boston. In i860 he took 
into partnership William Morrill, of Wind- 
ham, Me., who was associated with him at the 
time of his death. George R. Hale left two 
children — Leon L. ; and Jason L., who was 
born January 24, 1856, and died April 22, 
1887. Jason L. Hale married Harriet Saw- 
yer, of Knightsville, Me., and left one son, 
now living, George by name. 

Leon L. Hale was educated in the common 
schools of Westbrook, at the Pride's Corner 
High School, and at Gray's Business College, 
Portland, Me. After obtaining a business ed- 
ucation he first became employed in the large 
dry-goods establishment of Jordan, Marsh & 
Co., of Boston, but soon returned to Maine, 
where in June, 1S75, he was engaged by 
Royal Leighton, of Woodford's, Dccring, as 
book-keeper and cashier. This merchant then 
held the appointment of Postmaster at Wood- 
ford's, wherefore young Hale was duly sworn 
in as Assistant Postmaster, assuming full 
charge of the office, and conducting it in a 
satisfactory manner to the public for one year. 
Resigning his position at the end of that time 
he entered into the employ of Samuel W. 
Wilson, who was then, in 1876, about to 
start the first store in Decring Centre, a 
new and rapidly growing section of the town. 
Mr. Wilson being a man well advanced in 
years and without a knowledge of the busi- 
ness, his clerk became general manager of 
this enterprise, and was successful in build- 
ing up a large and lucrative business, which 
in 1877 was sold to other parties. 

In November, 1877, a few months after his 
marriage, Mr. Hale commenced the study of 
dentistry with Dr. Samuel A. Packard, of 
Portland, Me., at his office, corner of Temple 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and Middle Streets, remaining with him until 
July, 1879. He then removed from Wood- 
ford's. Me., to Booth bay Harbor, and opened 
an office, being the first dentist to permanently 
loeate in that thriving town, where he at once 
n the study of medicine with Dr. Charles 
W. Trice. During his stay there of one year. 
in connection with his practice and medical 
studies. Dr. Hale was reporter for the Booth- 
bav Register, and wi isional continued 

articles for that paper. In 18S0 he removed 
to Boston, and. opening an office on Kneeland 
Street, there practised dentistry, in 1SS2 re- 
moving with his family again to Westbrook, 
Me., for the purpose of entering the Bowdoin 
Medical School at Brunswick. In 1SS3 he 
returned to Boston, and entered the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, graduating with 
honors from this institution in May. 1884. 
He immediately opened an office on Tremont 
Street, where he practised until he removed to 
Chebeague Island, having in the mean time 
received the appointment of Superintendent of 
Essex Street Dispensary, now known as the 
North End Dispensary and Hospital. In 
Dr. Hale came to Casco Bay, and settled 
on Chebeague Island, where he has built up a 
large and successful practice, being highly 
esteemed and popular with all classes. 

Dr. Leon L. Hale has been twice married. 
His first wife, with whom he was united on 
July 15. 1877. was Josephine Mallard, daugh- 
ter of John Mallard, of Portland, Me. She 
passed away August 16, [883, leaving one 
child, Leona J. His present wife, to whom 
he was married May 5. 1804. was formerly 
Mrs. Alice M. Hamilton. She is a daugh- 
ter of Joshua L. Curit, of Chebeague Island. 
By this union there has been one child, Leon 
S. Hale, who was born May 14, 1S95. and 
died December 10, 1 1 

In politics Dr. Hale affiliates with the 
Democratic party. He is a man of broad 
views on the leading questions of the day, in- 
cluding religious subjects. Socially, he is a 
member of Falmouth Encampment, No. 11, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Tort- 
land, Me. : member of the Alumni of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. Boston, 
Mass. : and Fellow- of the Maine Academy of 
Medicine and Science. 




AMUEL L. PAINE, a veteran of 
the Civil War, now living in re- 
tirement in Sebago, was born in 
Baldwin, Cumberland County. Me., 
March 28. [821, son of David and Betsey 
(Lamb) Paine. Mr. Taine's father, who fol- 
lowed the carpenter's trade in connection with 
farming, was a well-known and highly es- 
teemed resident of Baldwin. His wife, 
Betsey Lamb, became the mother of eleven 
children, four sons and seven daughters, two 
of whom are now living. 

Samuel L. Paine received his education in 
the schools of his native town, and worked 
upon the farm until he was eighteen years old. 
He then began to learn the trade of a carpen- 
ter with his father, and subsequently practised 
it as a journeyman until September 19, 1864, 
when he enlisted as a private in Company I). 
Ninth Regiment. Maine Volunteer Infantry, 
being mustered into service at Portland. His 
regiment was assigned to duty in Virginia and 
North Carolina, and took part in the conclud- 
ing military operations of the Rebellion, he 
being discharged at Newbern, X.C., on June 
3. 1S65. He returned to Baldwin, where he 
remained until 1876, at which time he took 
up his residence in Harrison, and three years 
later removed to Mapleton, Aroostook County, 
Me. In 1885 he returned to Cumberland 
County, and, settling in the town of Sebago, 
has since resided here, retired from active 
labor. On October 4. 1840. Mr. Paine was 
united in marriage to Eliza A. Davis, and can 
now point with pride to three children, eight 
grandchildren, and one great-grandchild. In 
politics Mr. Paine is a Republican. He has 
led a busy and fairly prosperous career, and is 
now enjoying a well-earned rest from the 
cares and responsibilities of active life, with 
tlu- knowledge that he has faithfully per- 
formed his duties, both as a citizen and as a 
soldier. 



YRON EASTMAN MOORE, o( 
Deering. Me., a successful con- 
tractor and builder, is a son of 
Adams and Jane (Curry) Moore, 
of Lisbon. X.Y.. where his birth occurred on 
September 30, 1852. 




BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



213 



Adams Moore was born in Lisbon, St. Law- 
rence County, N.Y., and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of that town. He 
has always followed the vocation of a farmer, 
at which he has been fairly successful, dairy- 
ing being his specialty. His wife, Jane 
Curry, is a native of Toronto, Canada. Of the 
eleven children born of their union nine are 
living, namely: Agnes, the widow of John 
Mercer, of Warsaw, Wis. ; Martha, who mar- 
ried Edward C. Coffin, of Syracuse, N.Y. ; 
Albert W., a banker in Washington, Kan. ; 
Melissa, the wife of Charles Howard, of 
Somerville, N.J.; Alzina, who married a Mr. 
Bird, of Syracuse, N.Y. ; Myron Eastman; 
Judson D. ; John D. ; and Franklin A., the 
last three of whom are residents of Lisbon, 
N.Y. Both parents are still living at the age 
of eighty and seventy-eight years respectively. 
They are members of the Congregational 
Church of Lisbon, N.Y., of which he is 
Deacon. 

Myron Eastman Moore acquired a good 
practical education in the common schools of 
liis native place. He then learned the trade 
of a carpenter, and for a number of years he 
was employed as a journeyman. In 1873 -he 
came to Deering, where, shortly after, he es- 
tablished himself in business as a contractor 
and builder; and during the past twenty-two 
years he has erected a large number of build- 
ings in Portland and vicinity. He was mar- 
lied on March 4, 1874, to Miss Sarah A. 
Guptill, a daughter of Daniel Guptill, of 
Milton Mills, N.H. They have one child, a 
daughter named Stella L. 

Mr. Moore has served on the Town and City 
Committee for a number of years. In 1891 
and 1892 he was elected Assessor of the city 
of Deering; and he represented the city in the 
State legislature in 1894 and 1895, during 
which time he served on the Committee on 
Interior Waters, and has held other offices 
of responsibility and trust, discharging the 
duties of each in a faithful and business-like 
manner. Fraternally, he is affiliated with 
Deering Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and is now 
connected with the Maine Charitable Me- 
chanic Association. He is an attendant and 
supporter of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
of which his wife is a member. 



6fT7iA 



HADDEUS L. DODGL, the genial and 

J I popular station agent in Westbrook, ol 
the Portland & Rochester Railroad, 
was born in Woolwich, Me., April 5, 1X65, 
son of Alpheus and Margaret J. (Buker) 
Dodge. His ancestors were early settlers in 
Woolwich, of which place his paternal grand- 
father was a prosperous farmer. He died 
there in 1865. He gave his adherence to the 
Republican party, and attended the Congrega- 
tional church. Of his six children five are 
now living, namely: George W., residing in 
Woolwich; Wilmot, a resident of Bath, Me.; 
Mary, wife of Woodbury Hall, of Vienna, 
Me.; Sarah, who married Stephen Webb, of 
Scituate, Mass; and Alpheus, father of Thad- 
deus L. 

Alpheus Dodge, who was born in Woolwich, 
in early life learned the trade of a mason. 
He resided in Bowdoin, Me., for some years, 
and spent about five years in Boston, where he 
followed his trade. He finally settled in 
Bath, where he has since carried on business 
as a contractor and builder, having assisted in 
the erection of many fine buildings, including 
the post-office, custom-house, and high school. 
He is a Democrat in politics, and, while resid- 
ing in Woolwich, served as a member of the 
Board of Selectmen. In his religious views 
he is a Baptist, and, socially, was formerly 
connected with the Knights of Pythias Lodge 
in Bowdoinham. His wife, Margaret J. 
Buker, is a daughter of Isaac Buker, of Bow- 
doin. She was the mother of seven children, 
four of whom are living, namely: Charles I'., 
of Boothbay, Me.; Fanny W., who resides at 
home; Hattie L., wife of James Murray, of 
Bath; and Thaddeus L., the subject of this 
sketch. 

Thaddeus L. Dodge attended the public 
schools of Bowdoin, and after a course of study 
at the high school became a railroad employee. 
He acquired a knowledge of telegraphy, and 
after perfecting himself in general station 
work at Lisbon Falls, Me., where he remained 
for a year, he went to Westbrook Junction to 
take the position of clerk at the Maine Cen- 
tral station, capably performing his duties 
there for three years and a half. After a ser- 
vice of four months as station agent in 
Corinna, Me., he was placed in charge of the 



214 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Portland & Rochester station in Westbrook, 
where he has since remained. He possesses a 
genial disposition, which makes him de- 
servedly popular as a railroad official; and his 
management of the affairs of the Westbrook 
station is systematic and thorough. On De- 
cember 1 8, 1895, he was united in marriage 
with ('.race F Buck, of Deering, Me. 

In politics Mr. Dodge is a supporter of the 
Democratic party, and as a candidate for 
Alderman from Ward 3 in 1894 he polled a 
large vote, but was defeated by his Repub- 
lican opponent. In his religious views he 
is a Methodist. 



-OHN II. WARD, the possessor and 
manager of Side Hill Farm, as it is 
familiarly known in New Gloucester, 
Cumberland County Me., was born in 
Greenville, Piscataquis County, at the south 
end of Moosehead Lake, on August 25, 1839, 
son of John and Mary (Gerrish) Ward. 

John Ward was a native of Gorham, Cum- 
berland County. Me was the son of Jesse 
Ward, of that town, whose father, John Ward, 
came to Gorham from Cape Cod, in the colon)' 
of Massachusetts, the latter being a son of 
Genera] Ward of Revolutionary times and 
fame. 

When John Ward, of Gorham, started out in 
life tor himself, lie engaged in farming in his 
native town, living there until he was twenty- 
six years of age, after which he removed to 
Moosehead Lake, and during the subsequent 
thirty years was there successfully engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. He next settled in 
Gorham, and resided in that town until eighty- 
lour years of age, coming then to his son's 
home in New Gloucester to pass his remaining 
years, living to the age of eighty-nine. His 
wile, Mary Gerrish, was born in Windham, 
Me. They reared eight children, but John 
II. is now the only one living. 

John II. Ward continued to live with his 
parents until he was twenty years of age. He 
then engaged in farming on the Magal Road 
in the western part of New Gloucester, and 
alter ten years spent there he removed to the 
farm on which he now resides. It contains 
one hundred and sixteen acres of land, and is 



proportionately divided between pasturage and 
tillage. He usually keeps about fifteen milch 
cows, from which he gets a daily average of 
eighteen gallons of milk, which is sold to the 
dealers in Portland, Me. He also carries on 
general farming with excellent results, and is 
known throughout the county as a diligent 
worker and a thoroughly reliable man, one 
who by his personal efforts has met with a 
good degree of success. 

He was married on June 29, 1861, to Miss 
Mary S. Russell, of Gray, Me., a daughter of 
Charles R. and Susan (Shaw) Russell. Her 
father was a successful agriculturist of Wel- 
lington and Gray, Me., his last days being 
spent in the latter place, where his wife also 
died. Mr. and Mrs. Ward's union has been 
blessed by the birth of nine children, as fol- 
lows: Mary Ella, the widow of John P. 
Bailey, residing in New Gloucester; Eliza J., 
who married Prank Tufts, and lives on the old 
Penney Road in New Gloucester; Hannah, 
who died when two years old; Rosa Belle, the 
wife of G. A. Bowie, and now living in 
North Yarmouth, Me.; Sarah Maria, who is 
employed at the Hebron Academy; Lucy C, 
residing in Boston, Mass. ; Charles G., a 
farmer of New Gloucester; John R. and 
Harriet E., both of whom are at home. The 
children all received a good practical common- 
school education. 

Mr. Ward is numbered among the faithful 
adherents of the Republican party. He and 
his wife arc members of the First Congrega- 
tional Church of New Gloucester. 



r@y 



—+-**♦-»- 



EORGE N. AND FRANK II. 
\|ST BURNIIAM, of Bridgton, organ- 
izers of the Bridgton Machine Com- 
pany, are both natives of this village, the 
birth of the former having occurred February 
22, 1853, while the latter was born August 6, 
1856. They are of English extraction and of 
excellent pioneer ancestry, their paternal 
grandfather, Nathaniel Burnham, having been 
a native of the town of Cumberland, of which 
his parents were early settlers. Nathan Burn- 
ham, father of George and Frank, was born in 
Bridgton, and here married Miss Hannah A. 
Perry, who bore him five children, namely: 



lUOGRAl'HICAL REVIKW 



!'S 



Lizzie (deceased); Nellie E., wife of Frank 
P. Bennett; George N. ; Frank II.; and 
Alice (deceased). 

George N. and his brother, Frank H. Burn- 
ham, acquired their education in the public 
schools of their native town.' In 1871 they 
entered upon a three yeais' apprenticeship 
with S. A. Miller & Co., to learn the 
founder's and machinist's trade, in both of 
which they became proficient, working for the 
above-mentioned firm until 1887. The Bridg- 
ton Machine Company was then organized, 
Mr. Burnham and his brother becoming co- 
partners. They are engaged in the manufact- 
ure of turbine water-wheels, shingle and 
heading machines, and carry on a substantial 
and lucrative business in general mill work 
of all descriptions, giving universal satisfac- 
tion to their numerous customers and patrons. 

George N. Burnham was married April 1, 
1877, to Miss Ella M. Brackett, a native of 
Casco, Me. In politics he is a Democrat, 
and, socially, is a member of the Masonic 
Order, of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and of the Knights of Pythias. Frank 
H. Burnham was united in marriage August 
8, 1884, to Miss Addie Tucker, of Scarboro, 
Me.; and their wedded life has been bright- 
ened by the birth of one daughter, Myrtle 
A. Socially, Mr. Burnham, like his brother, 
belongs to the Masons and to the Odd Fel- 
lows, being a popular member of both organ- 
izations. 



•jtTVICHARD R. SCHONLAND, a mem- 
I -^ ber of the wide-awake firm of Schon- 
J_b\ land Brothers, of 8 and 10 Union 

Street, Portland, was born at Man- 
chester, N.H., March 8, 1861. He is of 
German parentage, his father and mother, 
Charles Henry and Julia (Hoppe) Schonland, 
having been natives of the Fatherland. The 
father, who is now a sausage manufacturer in 
Lawrence, Mass., learned the business from 
his father in Germany, and in turn taught his 
sons the mysterious art. 

Richard R. Schonland was educated in 
Lawrence, and under the instruction of his 
father, for whom he worked several years, be- 
came familiar with his present business. He 



wa.s also employed for a time in some oi the 
leading markets of that city, where he became 
an expert in meat-cutting, being subsequently 
employed as a meat-cutter in one of the large 
markets of Charlestown, Mass. After leaving 
Charlestown, Mr. Schonland worked for some 
time in a Lawrence market, and was also 
for a while in the employ of his brother 
Henry. In September, 1S91, the two brothers, 
Charles and Richard, who had investigated 
different cities in search of a favorable loca- 
tion, decided to establish themselves in busi- 
ness in Portland. Leasing a store at 485 Fore 
Street, they telegraphed to Lawrence for ma- 
chinery previously purchased, and at once 
commenced operations, continuing at that 
stand for several years. Being prosperous in 
their venture, they purchased land from Gen- 
eral Fessenden for the site of their present 
factory, which was completed in 1894, and 
into which they moved in January, 1895. 
They were pioneers in their branch of indus- 
try; and they have established a high and 
wide reputation for their products, which arc- 
invariably pure, healthful, and of standard 
quality. 

Mr. Schonland is independent in his polit- 
ical views, voting, according to his light, for 
the best men and best measures. Socially, 
he is a member of the Order of Elks, being at 
present Esquire of the Order. He likewise 
belongs to the Portland Athletic Club, and is 
a member of the Turn Verein of Lawrence. 

Mr. Schonland married Miss Helen L. 
Geisler, daughter of Henry and Wilhelmrna 
(Eichler) Geisler, the children of their union 
being three in number; namely, Carl P., 
Helen, and Mildred. The family have a win- 
ter residence at 18 Stone Street, Portland, but 
spend their summers at their cottage on Long 
Island. 



ACOB R. PRATT, a retired farmer and 
lifelong resident of Yarmouth, Cum- 
berland County, Me., was bom in this 
town, September 16, 1S17, son of 
David and Mary (Russell) Pratt. He is a de- 
scendant of Sherebia Pratt, who settled "in 
Cumberland considerably over a century ago, 
and became an extensive land-owner both in 



2 1 6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



.Maine and in Canada. This pioneer ancestor 
reared a family of eleven children, all of whom 
grew to maturity. He died in Portland, Me., 
in 1819. 

David Pratt, Mr. Pratt's father, was born 
in North Yarmouth, previous to the separa- 
tion of Maine from Massachusetts. He en- 
gaged in farming and lumbering, which he 
followed with ability and with good financial 
success, and became quite well-to-do in the 
world. In his religious faith he was a 
Baptist, and he supported the Whig party in 
politics. He resided upon a farm in the vicin- 
ity of his son's present property, which is a 
part of the original Pratt estate; and he died 
there on February 28, 1S50, at the age of 
seventy-four years. His wife, Mary Russell 
Pratt, became the mother of thirteen chil- 
dren, of whom Jacob R., the subject of this 
sketch, is the only survivor. She died on 
January 4, 1857, aged seventy-three years. 

Jacob R. Pratt attended the district school 
of Yarmouth, and at an early age he engaged 
in agricultural pursuits with his father. He 
succeeded to the possession of a portion of the 
old homestead in 1839, and has since contin- 
ued to reside here. For many years he culti- 
vated his farm of fifty acres with diligence 
and skill, always enjoying a bountiful pros- 
perity as the fruits of his labor. He is well 
known and highly esteemed, being one of the 
oldest residents of Yarmouth. In religion he 
entertains liberal views, and in politics he 
supports the principles of the Republican 
party. 

Shortly after taking possession of his prop- 
erty, Mr. Pratt married Sarah A. Barbour, of 
North Yarmouth. She died March 20, 1848, 
aged twenty-eight years, leaving one child; 
and he wedded for his second wife, Clarinda 
S. Sparrow, who was bom in Hartford, Me., 
in 1820, daughter of William Sparrow, a pros- 
pen his resident of that town, and died January 
23, 1876. Mr. Pratt has one child by each 
union, namely: Helen M., who was born 
March 25, 1846; and Eugene H., who was 
born August 29, 1853, and is now managing 
the farm. 

Eugene H. Pratt was educated in the schools 
of Yarmouth, and since completing his studies 
he has devoted his attention to agricultural 



pursuits. He conducts the home farm in an 
enterprising and progressive manner, and oc- 
cupies a prominent position among the active 
and successful farmers of this locality. He 
supports the Republican party in politics, and 
is a member of the Baptist church. 

On June 16, 1885, he was united in mar- 
riage with Carrie E. True, who was born in 
North Yarmouth, October 16, 1856, daughter 
of William and Jane (Pratt) True. Her 
father is a prosperous farmer of North Yar- 
mouth, but her mother is no longer living. 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene H. Pratt have been 
called to part with their only child, Alice II., 
who died May 15, 1895, aged seven years and 
two months. 



T^yiARLES OLIN FILES, M.D., a 
I Vp leading physician of Portland, whose 
^Js / specialty is the treatment of nervous 
diseases, was born in this city, Feb- 
ruary 12, 1847. His parents, Wentworth P. 
and Anna (Lombard) Files, were both born in 
Gorham, Me., which was the native place of 
many generations of the Files family. One of 
his ancestors on the maternal side, Solomon 
Lombard, was graduated from Harvard Col- 
lege in 1723. The subject of this sketch re- 
ceived his early education in the Portland 
schools and the Dwight School in Boston, 
where his parents resided in 1858-59. The 
family removed to Portland in the fall of 1859; 
and he at once entered the Portland High 
School, from which he was graduated in 1863. 
The high school was at that time under the 
charge of Dr. James II . Hanson, one of the 
ablest teachers the State ever produced ; and 
Miss Sarah Gilpatrick had been for some years 
one of the assistants. The Hon. Thomas B. 
Reed was assistant master during one year, 
1860-61. In the fall of 1863 young Files 
entered Harvard College, as a member of the 
class of 1867. His chum and room-mate for 
the Freshman year was Edward Winslow Fox, 
only son of the late Judge Edward Fox. The 
boys had been intimate friends during the 
whole course at the high school; and the close 
friendship was only broken in 18S0 by the 
death of Mr. Fox, who was apparently at that 
time at the bejrinnin"; of a most brilliant 




*s 



CHARLES OLIN FILES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



219 



professional and literary career. Near the 
close _of the Freshman year the health of Mr. 
Files broke clown so completely that he was 
advised to give up all thought of completing 
his college course. He then began the study 
of medicine, which he pursued for a year, 
when his health was so much improved that he 
determined to re-enter college, in the class of 
1 868. Just at this time Dr. Hanson, who was 
principal of Portland Academy, having re- 
ceived an offer to return to Waterville and take 
charge of the Coburn Classical Institute, 
asked Mr. Files to take his place as principal 
of the Portland Academy. 

Though then but little over eighteen years 
of age, Mr. Files accepted the position, and 
remained at the head of the academy through 
the summer and fall of 1865, through the year 
1866, and the spring and summer of 1S67. 
In the mean time he kept up with the class of 
1868 at college; and in the fall, after passing 
his examination, he entered the class at the 
beginning of the Senior year. He was gradu- 
ated in the regular course, and immediately 
entered the Portland School for Medical In- 
struction. In the fall of 1868 he matriculated 
at the medical department of the University 
of Pennsylvania; and in the fall of 1869 he 
entered the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, New York City, graduating in March, 
1S70. In April of that year Dr. Files opened 
his office in Portland, and has continued here 
in practice till the present time, except for a 
period of two years, when he was incapacitated 
for professional work by ill health. He has 
established a reputation for skill in the treat- 
ment of nervous diseases that makes him one 
of the foremost specialists of the city. 

On October 12, 1871, Dr. Files was mar- 
ried to Julia E., youngest daughter of Captain 
J. B. Coyle, manager of the Portland Steam 
Packet Company and one of the founders of 
the International Steamship Company and the 
Maine Steamship Company. Dr. and Mrs. 
Files have two children — Nina N., born Oc- 
tober 11, 1872; and Charles Edwin, born Au- 
gust 30, 1874. 

In politics Dr. Files is a Republican. He 
and his wife attend the Chestnut Street Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, of which the Doctor 
has been organist for many years. They have 



a handsome residence at 120 Free Street, Port- 
land. 




ENJAMIN F. STANLEY, who con- 
ducts a good farm in the town of 
Harrison, was born in York County, 
Maine, December 5, 1830, son of 
Benjamin and Lydia E. (Thompson) Stanley. 
His father was a native of Sanford, Me., born 
July 26, 1799. In early manhood he worked 
for a time in Cambridge; but in 1832 he set- 
tled upon a farm in Harrison, where he fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits until 1863, when 
he enlisted as a private in Company G, 
Twenty-ninth Maine Volunteers. He died 
June 29, 1864, while on his way home from 
New Orleans by water, and was buried at sea. 
His death was a loss to the town as a useful 
ami esteemed citizen. His wife, Lydia E. 
Thompson, who was a native of Sanford, be- 
came the mother of five children, as follows: 
Benjamin F., the subject of this sketch; 
Harriet, born October 27, 1S32, married I. P. 
Roberts, and resides in Milwaukee, Wis.; 
Cyrus K., born February 10, 1835, is now de- 
ceased; Lydia, born March 4, 1839, C '' C1 -' Feb- 
ruary 28, 1855; and Martha L., who was born 
April 18, 1 841, married J. F. Wight, and re- 
sides in Wellesley Hills, Mass. The mother 
died November 22, 1889. 

Benjamin F. Stanley obtained his education 
in the common schools of Harrison, and at the 
age of eighteen found employment as a hotel 
clerk in Harmony, Me. In 1S51 he went to 
Bangor, this State, where he was employed in 
the saw-mills upon the Penobscot River, re- 
maining there until 1853, when he returned to 
Harrison, and, with his father, settled upon 
his present farm. They considerably im- 
proved the property before his father's death ; 
and Mr. Stanley now owns one hundred acres 
of valuable land, which he devotes principally 
to the cultivation of hay and corn. He is an 
admirer and breeder of good stock, raising 
some fine specimens of Hereford and Durham 
cattle. 

On September 21, 1S51, Mr. Stanley was 
united in marriage to Elizabeth Graves, who 
was born in Athens, Me., daughter of Thomas 
Graves, her father being no longer living. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mr. and Mrs. Stanley have two children, 
namely: Fanny L., born December 19, 1852, 
resides with her parents; George F., born De- 
cember 10, 1854, married a Miss Burke, of 
Rowley, Mass., and also at this date resides 
at home. 

Mr. Stanley is widely known and equally 
esteemed by his fellow-townsmen, among 
whom he occupies a prominent position; and 
he is a leader in all matters relative to the 
general welfare of the community. Though 
not an aspirant for political honors, he takes 
a lively interest in public affairs, and supports 
the Republican party at the polls. 




LFRED I?. WINSLOW, Treasurer and 
Collector of Westbrook, is a native of 
this city, being born here, October 
24, 1858, son of Stephen R. and 
Hannah (Hacker) Winslow. Mr. Winslow's 
grandfather, Josiah Winslow, was a native of 
that part of Falmouth which is now included 
within the limits of Westbrook, and a lifelong 
resident of the locality, being well and favor- 
ably known as an upright, conscientious man 
and an exemplary citizen. He died in 1880, 
aged eighty-eight years. He reared a family 
of six children, of whom three are living, 
namely: Stephen R., father of Alfred B. ; Ed- 
ward B., who resides in the State of Kansas; 
and Lydia M., wife of I. N. Hacker, of West- 
brook. 

Stephen R. Winslow was born in West- 
brook, and, when a young man, learned the 
shoemaker's trade, which he has since followed 
with profitable results. Some time ago he 
moved to Lynn, Mass., where he now resides. 
He is a Republican in politics, and in relig- 
ion is a member of the Society of Friends. 
His wife, Hannah Hacker, who is a native of 
Westbrook, has had four children, two of 
whom are living, namely: Alfred B., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and Ellen A., who resides 
at Mount Holyoke Seminary. 

Alfred B. Winslow received his education 
in the public schools of Westbrook; and after 
a course of study at the high school he en- 
tered mercantile business as a clerk in the 
grocery store of H. P. Murch, continuing in 
that capacity for six years. At the end of 



that time he formed a copartnership with 
James L. Brown, purchasing his employer's 
business; and for twelve years the firm of 
Winslow & Brown conducted a profitable 
trade. Mr. Winslow then sold his interest 
to his partner, anil accepted the office of City 
Treasurer and Collector, being appointed by 
Mayor Cordwell in January, 1894, to fill the 
unexpired term of G. Fred. Murch. In March 
of the same year he was appointed by Mayor 
Cutter to that office for the years 1895 and 
1896. In politics he is an active supporter of 
the Republican party; and he rendered valu- 
able service to the city as a member of the 
Board of Aldermen from Ward 3 in 1892 and 
1S93. 

On September 1, 1882, Mr. Winslow was 
united in marriage to Hattie M. Swett, daugh- 
ter of William H. Swett, of Westbrook, and 
has three children — EarleC, twelve; Evelyn, 
ten; and Frank W., seven years of age. 
Mr. Winslow is a worthy representative of 
several fraternal Orders, and has taken an ac- 
tive part in developing their usefulness. He 
is a member of Temple Lodge, No. 86, A. F. 
& A. M., Westbrook Lodge, No. 27, Knights 
of Pythias, of which he has filled all of the 
chairs, being at the present time Past Chan- 
cellor and a Trustee, and is Treasurer of 
Tribe 35 of the Order of Red Men. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Winslow attend the Universalist 
church. 



^5J)/oODBRIDGE ' 

VS\/ is living retir 
•"* *■"* ness, is a n: 



G. OSBORNE, who 
ired from active busi- 
lative of Cumberland 
County, Maine, his birth having occurred 
July 14, 1837, in the town of Scarboro. His 
father, the Rev. Charles F. Osborne, and his 
grandfather, the Rev. John B. Osborne, were 
faithful ministers of the Free Will Baptist 
denomination. 

John B. Osborne was a native of Lee, 
N.H., where, when but a boy, he became im- 
bued with religious zeal, and determined to 
consecrate his life to the cause of Christian- 
ity. He was ordained to the ministry in his 
native town, and became one of the most suc- 
cessful and influential preachers of that faith 
in New Hampshire. He was twice married. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



His first wife, Abigail Smith, bore him three 
children. His second wife, Mary Frost, 
mother of the Rev. C. F. Osborne, was born 
in Epping, N.I I. She bore him fourteen 
children; and of these Jerry Jackson Osborne, 
the youngest child, is the only one now liv- 
ing, lie is a farmer in Gorham, owning one 
hundred and fifty acres of land, about one- 
third of it being under cultivation. 

Charles F. Osborne, born March 15, 1800, 
in Lee, N.H., was there reared to man's es- 
tate. For some years he was engaged mostly 
in surveying in Portland, being employed a 
portion of the time as a clerk in a store. He 
subsequently started in mercantile business 
for himself, opening a general store, but gave 
up this in order to fit himself for the ministry, 
for which he was eminently adapted. He 
was ordained as pastor of the Free Will Bap- 
tist church at Fort Hill, Gorham, in 1837; 
anil he continued his pastoral labors until his 
death, January 24, 1S54, his last charge being 
at the Limerick and Limington Church in 
Parsonsfield, quarterly meeting, York County. 
The Rev. Charles F. Osborne married Susan 
C. Leavis, a daughter of Thomas Leavis, of 
Portland, and of their nine children the follow- 
ing are living; namely, Harriet S., Ellen M., 
Charles H., Ervine D., Lillia, and Wood- 
bridge G. Harriet S., born in September, 
1820, is the wife of Hanover S. Nickerson, 
of Pittsfield, Me., where both attend the Free 
Will Baptist church. Ellen Maria, born in 
March, 1831, makes her home with her sister 
Harriet in Pittsfield, and is there a member of 
the Free Will Baptist church. Charles H., 
who was one of triplets, born in December, 
1835, owns a farm of one hundred acres in 
Gorham, where he makes a specialty of early 
fruits. lie married in November, 1868, Mrs. 
Sarah Haywood, born Holmes; and their eld- 
est child, Sumner C. Osborne, married Isa- 
belle Durrell, of Hyde Park, Mass. Ervine 
D., a graduate of Bowdoin College, is now 
engaged in teaching in Winthrop, Mass. 
Lillia is a professional nurse of Brookline, 
Mass. They are Congregational ists in their 
religious belief. 

Woodbridge G. Osborne was educated at 
the Limerick ami Limington Academies, 
being graduated from the latter when but 



sixteen years old. He at once began teaching 
school, first in Sebago, in the following winter 
at Baldwin; and the next fall he had charge oi 
the tuition school at Emery's Corner in Lim- 
ington. In 1855 he taught the winter term ol 
the North Gorham school ; and just afterward 
he assumed charge of the school at Gorham 
Corner, where he remained a year. He had 
confined himself so closely to the duties ol 
his calling that he was now forced to abandon 
his profession for a while. He came to Port- 
land, and was subsequently employed as a 
clerk in a store for a short time. In 1S59 nc 
established himself in a mercantile business 
in company with J. F. Dearborn, the firm 
being Osborne & Dearborn. The following 
year he sold his share to his partner, and 
began travelling for Shaw Brothers, wholesale 
grocers of Portland. When the Shaws gave 
up business in i860, Mr. Osborne opened a 
store for the sale of grain and groceries on 
Market Square in this city, forming a partner- 
ship with O. W. Eldredge, whom he after- 
ward bought out. He continued this business 
successfully until the summer of 1862, when 
he sold out, in order that he might be free to 
enter the service of his country. On July 28 
he enlisted under Captain Ellis M. Sawyer in 
Company E, Seventeenth Maine Volunteer In- 
fantry; and for three months he was employed 
as mail messenger. He was then taken sick, 
and, being incapacitated for active duty, was 
assigned to look after the Quartermaster's 
stores. He was subsequently promoted, and 
given charge of the Quartermaster's store at 
Blue Ridge Mountain. Another promotion 
placed him in the office of book-keeper at the 
Brigadier Quartermaster's department. His 
health remaining impaired, he was from there 
sent to Washington, where he was honorably 
discharged April 30, 1863. By virtue of his 
patriotic services Mr. Osborne receives a pen- 
sion ; and he is a member of Bosworth Post, 
No. 2, Grand Army of the Republic, ol 
Portland. 

After regaining his health, Mr. Osborne 
resumed teaching, being employed successively 
at Gorham, Buxton, and Cape Elizabeth, re- 
tiring from this work in 1S74, his last school 
being the Ligonia at the Rolling-mills in 
Cape Elizabeth. In 1S75 he began travelling 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



for the wholesale grocery house of W. E. 
Donnell & Co., with whom he remained five 
years. He was subsequently employed in a 
similar capacity by Charles McLaughlin & 
Co., and then by Thomas Dana & Co., of 
Boston. While working for the latter firm, 
through some business transaction Mr. Os- 
borne took possession of a grocery store in a 
New Hampshire town, where he remained en- 
gaged in business for six or seven years before 
he could dispose of the store at an advantage. 
Returning then to Maine, he worked a year for 
Twitchell, Champlin & Co. of Portland, 
going in I S94 to the store of Shaw, Harmon 
& Carney, by whom he was employed until 
December of that year, when he retired from 
active life. Mr. Osborne has a farm of sixty- 
five acres, which he has bought in small lots, 
at South Portland; and here he spends the 
warmer months of the year, residing in the 
winter season in Portland. 

On August 29, 1 86c, Mr. Osborne was 
united in marriage with Mary Ellen Anthoine, 
daughter of Deacon Daniel Anthoine, of Cape 
Elizabeth. Their only child, Woodbridge 
G- Osborne, Jr., was born April 5, 1880. 
In politics Mr. Osborne is a steadfast and 
loyal Republican. Religiously, both he and 
his wife are members of the Eree Will Baptist 
church. Socially, he is identified with 
several of the leading organizations of the city, 
being a member of Beacon Lodge, No. 67, 
Independent Order of Odd Eellows; of Bram- 
hall Lodge, No. 3, Knights of Pythias; of 
Portland Encampment, No. 19, Independent 
Order of (Hid Fellows; and Oasis Command- 
eiy, No. 241, of the Golden Cross of Knight- 
ville. 




ILLIAM R. LINCOLN, a promi- 
nent factor in the business life of 
Brunswick, Me., owner of a large 
mill and an extensive dealer in grain, was 
born in Litchfield, Me., January 3, 1834. lie- 
is the son of Daniel and Olive (Baker) Lin- 
coln, the former a native of Scituate, Mass., the 
latter born in the vicinity of Cape Cod. Mr. 
Lincoln's paternal grandfather was Solomon 
Lincoln, a fanner, the greater part of whose 
life was spent in Scituate, where he died at an 



advanced age. His son, Daniel Lincoln, re- 
moved from Scituate to Freeport, Me., when a 
young man, and there worked at shoemaking 
for some time; and he then purchased a farm 
in Brunswick, and devoted the rest of his life 
to agricultural pursuits, dying at the age of 
seventy-six. His wife lived to be eighty-two 
years of age. She was a member of the Free 
Will Baptist church. Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln 
were the parents of seven children, only two 
of whom are now living — William R., the 
subject of this sketch; and Edward S., a baker, 
also a resident of Brunswick. 

William R. Lincoln went to work when but 
twelve years of age, obtaining a position in a 
store, which he retained six years. Lie then 
went to California, at that time the Mecca of 
Mammon worshippers, and worked in the gold 
mines for a while, soon, however, returning to 
the East. His next venture was in the livery 
business at Gardiner, Me; and after that he 
established a bakery at Bath, which he man- 
aged for thirty years. In 1886 he built the 
mill of which he is now owner, and has since 
conducted a growing and prosperous business, 
selling feed of all kinds. Mr. Lincoln is a 
most competent miller, his long experience as 
a baker making him an expert in the require- 
ments of the trade. 

In 1857 he was united in marriage with 
Fannie M. Oliver, a native of Brunswick, 
daughter of Amos Oliver, a lumberman of this 
town. She died at the age of twenty-nine, 
leaving one child, a daughter named Fannie, 
who is now the wife of the Rev. F. LI. Gile, 
a clergyman of the Unitarian church. Mr. 
and Mrs. Gile have five children — Nellie, 
William, Harry, Lucy, and Richard. Mr. 
Lincoln married for his second wife his first 
wife's sister, Harriet A. Oliver; and by this 
union he has one daughter, Alice Velma. 

Politically, he favors the Democratic party. 
He takes an active interest in the town 
government, and has served on the Board of 
Selectmen two years. He belongs to Polar 
Star Lodge, No. 114, A. F. & A. M., of 
Bath; to the Royal Arch Chapter of Bath; 
St. Bernard, No. 2; and to the Order of the 
Golden Cross. His wife is a member of the 
Congregational church in Brunswick. His 
first wife belonged to the church of that de- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 






nomination in Bath. Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln 
are highly esteemed in Brunswick, where they 
are prominent members of society. 



(^Tvugustus f: 

LjA attorney and 
/J£y^ ing at Port 



FREEDOM MOULTON, 
d counsel lor-at -law, resid- 
tland, who was born May 
i, 1848, at Jay, Franklin County, 
comes from excellent English stock. The 
emigrating ancestor of the family was William 
Moulton, who left Ormsby, Norfolk County, 
England, in 1638, and subsequently settled at 
Hampton, N.H., where he served as Select- 
man, and was otherwise identified with the 
settlement of the town. Me and his descend- 
ants retained their citizenship in that section 
of the Granite State until 1745, when Cap- 
tain Daniel Moulton, who was fourth in de- 
scent from William, the emigrant, removed to 
this county, locating at Scarboro. A more 
extended sketch of the early ancestors of the 
family may be found in the "Moulton Gen- 
ealogy," compiled and published by Augustus 
Freedom Moulton in 1892. 

Captain Daniel Moulton was quite an ex- 
tensive landholder in Scarboro and vicinity. 
His wife was a grand-daughter of Charles 
Pine, the celebrated Indian fighter, of whom 
he was an especial favorite, and who endeav- 
ored to entail a tract of land upon him and 
his issue. He was active in the Revolution- 
ary War, being a member of the Committee of 
Safety for most of the time. The line of de- 
scent continued through his son Charles, 
through Captain Joshua Moulton, the grand- 
lather of Augustus, and through his son 
Freedom, father of Augustus. 

Freedom Moulton, a native of Scarboro, 
born October 31, 1808, was educated for a 
professional life. In his earlier years he was 
a teacher at Scarboro and Gorham. From 
1842 until 1853 he lived at Jay, being em- 
ployed as a teacher a portion of the time, and 
devoted to agricultural pursuits when not 
otherwise engaged. While there he was a 
member of the superintending School Com- 
mittee. Returning to Scarboro, he purchased 
of Ezra Carter, his father-in-law, the old 
homestead, where he thereafter resided until 
his death, July 31, 1857. He married mi 



June 13, 1842, Miss Slmah Coffin, daughtei ol 
Ezra and Sarah (Faybyan) Carter. She is a 
native of Scarboro, born December 20, 1811, 
and is still living on the old homestead, active 
in body and mind. They were the parents ol 
four children, as follows: Martha Carter, who 
married Lewis O. Hills, of Arlington, 111., 
and died in 1889; Sarah Carter, a graduate of 
the Portland High and of the Oswego, N.Y., 
Normal Schools, who is a successful teacher, 
and resides on the old homestead ; Augustus 
Freedom, the subject of this notice; and 
Lydia Frances who after an attendance at the 
Westbrook Seminar)' was graduated from the 
Normal Training School at Oswego, N.Y., 
and is now one of the corps of instructors at 
the Jackson School in this city. 

Augustus Freedom Moulton received the 
rudiments of his education in the public 
schools. He subsequently attended the West- 
brook Seminary, from which he received his 
diploma in 1869. He then entered Bowdoin 
College, where he was popular among his 
classmates, and belonged to both the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon and the Phi Beta Kappa So- 
cieties. After a four years' course he gradu- 
ated at the head of his class, being class orator 
for that occasion. During the year 1874 Mr. 
Moulton was a tutor in Bowdoin College. In 
the following year he began his law studies 
with William L. Putnam, now Judge of the 
United States Court of Appeals, remaining 
with him until admitted to the bar of Cumber- 
land County in October, 1876. Mr. Moulton 
still continues his residence at Scarboro, 
which he represented in 1878 and 1879 * n 
the State legislature, being a member of the 
Judiciary Committee both years. Beginning 
the practice of his profession in Portland, Mr. 
Moulton has since had an abundance of ex- 
perience, both in corporation and general 
work, his practice being extensive and lucra- 
tive, and his legal knowledge and ability un- 
surpassed. Twice has he been nominated 011 
the Democratic ticket for Judge of Probate 
and for County Attorney. He is one of the 
most influential members of his party, with 
a brilliant record as a stump speaker and 
lecture]'. 

Mr. Moulton spends his summers at the old 
homestead in Scarboro, where he has served as 



--4 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



School Committee for fifteen years. During 
the winter season he is usually a guest of the 
Preble House, this city. He is prominent in 
the Masonic Lodges of Portland, belonging to 
the Ancient Landmark Lodge, Mount Vernon 
Chapter, Portland Council, and Portland Com- 
mandery. He is also a leading member of the 
Fraternity Club, a literary society composed 
of well-known men, each of whom presents a 
paper on some scientific subject at least once 
each season, .and likewise entertains the mem- 
bers of the club once a year. He has also 
been for some years one of the Trustees of 
Westbrook Seminary. Mr. Moulton, who is 
interested in the early history of the State, 
and devotes much of his time to the study of 
early records, is a prominent member of the 
Maine Historical and the Maine Genealogical 
Societies. 



w 



[LLIAM TRUE, a prosperous farmer 
of North Yarmouth, son of Samuel 
and Mary (Titcomb) True, was born 
upon his present homestead, December 5, 
1 S 19. The family is of English origin; and 
Mr. True traces his lineage back to Henry 
True, who, with his brother Richard, emi- 
grated to America in 1635 or 1640. Mr. 
True's great-grandfather, Nathaniel True, 
was one of the first settlers of North Yar- 
mouth, and followed the occupation of a 
clothier at the Falls for many years. His 
wife was before marriage Sarah Brown. 

Their son, William True, first, cleared and 
improved the farm upon which his grandson 
and namesake now resides. Grandfather True 
was a sturdy and industrious pioneer, who 
prospered in spite of the many difficulties to 
be met with and hardships to be endured in 
those early days; and he lived to a ripe old 
age. He married Susan Brown; and they 
reared a family of three sons and seven daugh- 
ters, all of whom became heads of families and 
have passed away. Of these Samuel, Mr. 
True's father, was the youngest son. He was 
born in North Yarmouth, was reared to agri- 
cultural pursuits, and always resided upon the 
home farm, which he cultivated energetically 
and with prosperous results during the active 
period of his busy life, attaining the age of 



sixty-two years. He was liberal in his relig- 
ious views and a Whig in politics. Llis 
wife, Mary Titcomb, who was a native of 
North Yarmouth, became the mother ot live 
children, as follows: Moses, who died at the 
age of seventy; William, the subject of this 
sketch; Sarah, wife of Captain E. R. York, of 
Yarmouth; Cornelia K., wife of Hiram 
Tuttle, of Yarmouth ; and Samuel, who is no 
longer living. Mrs. Mary T. True lived In 
reach the age of over eighty years. 

William True grew to manhood upon the 
home farm, and received both a common- 
school and an academic education. Adopting 
agriculture as an occupation, at the age of 
twenty-two he purchased the homestead prop- 
erty, where he still continues to reside, hav- 
ing remodelled and otherwise improved the 
buildings. His farm consists of one hundred 
acres of unusually good grass land, and is 
among the very best in the town. He has 
brought the place to its present condition of 
neatness and thrift by hard work and close at- 
tention to every detail. He is not only a 
good manager at home, but has given his share 
of time and attention to public affairs, lie- 
served as a member of the Board of Selectmen 
in 1862; and he has for many years been 
actively interested in the progress of educa- 
tion, serving as President of the School Board 
for a number of years, and is at the present 
time a Trustee of the School Fund. He is a 
Republican in politics. 

On December 10, 1S45, Mr. True married 
Jane Y. Pratt, who was born June 29, (822, 
daughter of Levi 11. Pratt, and died Septem- 
ber 5, 1 888; and on June 7, 1894, he married 
his present wife, whose maiden name was 
Phnebe Gray Loring, and was then a widow, 
Mrs. Barstow. She was born in North Yar- 
mouth, January 24, 1S28, daughter of Jeremiah 
and Marjana (Leonard) Loring, both of whom 
were natives of North Yarmouth, the father 
being a prosperous farmer. Jeremiah Loring 
died at the age of seventy, and his wife lived 
to reach the age of seventy-eight years. They 
reared a family of nine children, four of whom 
are living, namely: Phcebe, Mrs. True, who is 
the eldest; Dorcas, who is now Mrs. Hicks, 
and resides in Hampden, Me.; Charles R., of 
Livermore Falls; and Edna A., who is now 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mrs. Marston, of North Yarmouth. By her 
previous union with Hatherly Harstow, who 
died September 11, 1872, Mrs. True had five 
children, namely: Emma Estelle, wife of Ed- 
ward W. Knight, of Deering; Arabelle Gray, 
wife of Henry F. Dowst, of Bangor; Flor- 
ence, who died November 11, 1862; Ilattie 
Loring, wife of James F. Hamilton, of Ban- 
goi ; and Charles II., who was born March 20, 
1866, and is also a resident of Bangor. 

Mr. True has had six children, as fyllows: 
Alice J., who is now the wife of William H. 
Mitchell, of Saco, Me.; Carrie E., wife of 
Eugene Pratt, of Yarmouth; Lois P., born No- 
vember 5, 1847, anc l died November 30, 1866; 
Mary B., born March 27, 1851, and died April 
1, 1876; Abbie Florence, born December 15, 
1863, and died November 27, 1S64; and one 
who died in infancy. 

Mr. True is a member of the Baptist church, 
of which he has been a Deacon for many years. 




|DWIN MANSON JILLSON, a well- 
known blacksmith of Otisfield, who 
follows his trade in connection with 
farming, was born at the Jillson homestead, 
in this Cumberland County town, on Febru- 
ary 12, 1852, son of David C. and Ellis B. 
(Scribner) Jillson. Mr. J illson's great-grand- 
father emigrated from England; and his son 
Stephen, Mr. Jillson's grandfather, settled in 
what was formerly the town of Randolph. 
He later moved to Casco, where he engaged in 
trade, and also carried on agricultural pursuits 
on what is known as the May berry farm. 

David C. Jillson, son of Stephen, was born 
in Casco, and was reared to farm life. He re- 
mained at home with his parents until reach- 
ing the age of eighteen, when he took up his 
residence in Otisfield; and in 1835 he settled 
upon the farm where he still resides. He has 
always followed farming and stock-raising 
with energy and success, and is known as a 
good neighbor and a worthy citizen. He has 
never aspired to political prominence, but has 
always maintained a lively interest in the 
general welfare of the community; and he 
acted as Justice of the Peace for many years. 
His wife, Ellis B. Scribner, became the 
mother of five children, as follows: Lester L., 



who married Thirza Smith, and is now con- 
ducting a prosperous mercantile business in 
South Otisfield; David C, Jr., who married 
for his first wife Sally Morse, and for his 
second Flora Chaplin, of Naples, Me., and 
lives in Otisfield; Elsie Jane, wife of James 
Mains, a farmer of Otisfield; Edwin M., the 
subject of this sketch; and Electa M., wife of 
Atwood Holden, a blacksmith of Portland. 
Mrs. Ellis B. Jillson died in August, 1888. 

Edwin Manson Jillson received his educa- 
tion in the common schools of Otisfield, and 
resided with his parents until after his mar- 
riage. When a young man he engaged in sell- 
ing sewing machines, travelling about the 
country for that purpose; but, having learned 
the blacksmith's trade, he has since made that 
his principal occupation. He likewise culti- 
vates the homestead farm of one hundred and 
fifty acres, raising good crops of potatoes and 
other vegetables, grain, and fruit; but his own 
time is mostly spent in his blacksmith shop, 
where he is conducting a profitable business. 
In politics he is a Democrat, though not in 
any way a partisan, preferring to support the 
candidate he most approves; and he has served 
with ability as a member of the Board ol 
Selectmen for two terms. 

On February 16, 1S75, Mr. Jillson was 
married to Amanda M. Walls, of Biddeford, 
Me., daughter of Thomas and Susan J. Walls, 
the former of whom was employed in a factory 
and died from the result of wounds received 
in the Civil War. His wife, who still sur- 
vives, is now living with her daughter. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jillson have two children, 
namely: Edwin P., who was born July 25, 
1880; and Alice W., who was born April [8, 
1885. Mr. Jillson i-s connected with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, the Order 
of American Mechanics, and the Good Tem- 
plars, with which his wife is also associated; 
and both are members of the Union Church. 



ERTRAND F. MARSHALL, M.D., 
a rising young physician of Gorham, 
this county, sun of the late Dr. Al- 
bert O. Marshall, was bom October 
31, 1866, in the town of Oxford, Oxford 
County, Me. His grandfather, Moses Mar 




226 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



shall, was born, lived, and died in Hebron, 
( txford County, where he was numbered 
among the leading citizens of the town, being 
prominent in business and in public life, 
lie was the owner of a saw-mill, and carried 
.hi an extensive business in lumber. To him 
and his wife, whose maiden name was Ruth 
Whittemore, eight children were born, five of 
whom are yet living; namely, Isaac, Miranda, 
Joseph, Moses, and Frank. 

Isaac Marshall has been twice married. His 
first wife, Mahitable Carr, died, leaving one 
child, Carr; and he subsequently married 
Lydia Keene, who bore him four children, of 
whom two are living — Dr. N. M. Marshall 
and Mrs. Lizzie Scribner. Miranda, wife of 
Robert Glover, has six children — Anne, Ed- 
ward, Albert, Frank, Carrie, and Nellie. Jo- 
seph Marshall married Vilona Jones, and has 
one child, Abby. Moses Mason Marshall 
married Caroline Newton, and has three chil- 
dren — Sylvester, Marion, and Elba. Frank 
Marshall married Anna Stowe, of Marlboro, 
Mass., and has two children— Edith and 
Fanny. 

Albert Q. Marshall was born in Hebron, 
August 12, 1837, and there received his ele- 
mentary education. After teaching school 
a number of terms, he attended Colby Univer- 
sity in Waterville four years, receiving his 
diploma in August, 1862. He was then em- 
ployed as a clerk in the Ordnance Office of the 
War Department in Washington, D. C. ; and, 
after leaving Washington, he entered the 
medical department of Bowdoin College, tak- 
ing two courses there and one at Harvard, 
graduating from Bowdoin in 1867. He at 
once began the practice of his profession at 
New Gloucester, Me., and met with such good 
success that he there continued his labors until 
his death, May 3, 1880. He was married to 
Miss Helen L. Dunn, daughter of James 
Dunn, of Poland, in 1862, and of their four 
children — Louis A., Harry F., Bertrand F. , 
and Gertrude — two are now living — Dr. Ber- 
trand F. ; and his sister, Gertrude A. The 
latter was born March 13, I S69, and is now 
the wife of the Rev. C. D. Boothby, of Thorn - 
aston, Me. The father was a Republican in 
politics, and, religiously, a member of the 
Congregational church. His wife, however, 



was a Methodist in belief, belonging to the 
church of that denomination in Poland, this 
State. 

Bertrand F. Marshall learned his early 
lessons in the New Gloucester schools, after- 
ward pursuing his higher studies at Hebron 
Academy. Going then to Marlboro, Mass., 
he was there employed as a book-keeper about 
four years, but utilized his spare moments in 
studying medicine, for which he had a predi- 
lection. He took his first course at the Port- 
land Medical College, afterward spending two 
years at Bowdoin College, going thence to 
Dartmouth, from which he was graduated in 
1887. Dr. Marshall began his professional 
career at Moultonboro, N.I I., where he re- 
mained a year. In 1888 he came to Gorham, 
where he has built up a good practice, at the 
same time winning the confidence and esteem 
of the community. Socially, he is a membei 
of Oriental Lodge, No. 17, Knights of Pythias, 
of Windham, and of the Improved Order of 
Red Men, Nagwaumkeag Tribe, No. 56, of 
Gorham. 

Dr. Marshall has been twice married. His 
first wife, with whom he was united on Janu- 
ary 1, 1888, was Minnie D., daughter of John 
Smith, of West Gray, Me. She died Decem- 
ber 23, 1S92, leaving two children — Gladys 
V., born April 17, 1 891 ; and Orland S. , born 
November 30, 1892. On June 4, 1894, the 
Doctor was married to Miss Eva A. Smith, 
a sister of his former wife. She is a membei 
of the Free Will Baptist Church of Auburn, 
Me., as was her sister, the first wife of Dr. 
Marshall. 



DWIN L. POOR, attorney-at-law and 
one of the leading citizens of Sebago, 
Me., is a native of this town. He 
was born August 9, 1839, son of Tyler 1'. and 
Almira (Barker) Poor, who reared a family of 
eight children, four sons and four daughters. 
Edwin L. Poor spent his early boyhood on 
his father's farm, acquiring during that time 
a rudimentary education in the district school 
near by, after which he attended the North 
Bridgton Academy. When sixteen years of 
age he started out in life for himself, going to 
Lynn, Mass., where he* worked for two years. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



227 



At the end of that time he returned to Sebago, 
and engaged in lumbering and such other 
work as he was able to secure. Soon after he 
was nineteen years old he engaged in school 
teaching, which he followed at intervals until 
he had taught thirty-one terms all together. 
About 1865 he began the study of law in the 
office of the Hon. N. S. Littlefield, of Bridg- 
ton, with whom he remained about three years; 
and in March, 1870, he was admitted to the 
bar. He then opened his office in Sebago 
Centre, and he has since been successfully 
engaged in the practice of his profession. In 
addition to this, during the past fifteen years 
Mr. Poor has conducted a thriving mercantile 
business here, and for twenty-five years has 
dune quite a fine insurance business. 

In 1864 he was joined in marriage with Miss 
Amanda M. Whitney, of Bethel. A son and 
two daughters have been born of their union, 
namely: Leland H., a practising physician of 
Casco, Me. ; Lillian and Lenette (twins), ac- 
complished young ladies still living at home, 
who are engaged in school teaching 

In politics Mr. Poor is a Democrat. He 
was a representative from this district in 1879 
and 1 889, and during both terms was on the 
Committee of State Education, and the first 
term also on legal affairs. Since he was 
twenty-one years of age, he has held the office 
of Justice of the Peace. lie is the present 
Postmaster of Sebago, and also held this office 
during President Cleveland's first Presidential 
term. The other official capacities in which 
Mr. Poor has served are: Selectman of Sebago 
one term, Supervisor of Schools about twenty 
years. Collector of Taxes about six years, and 
Town Clerk for five years. He is a member 
of Denmark Lodge, No. 50, Independent 
< >nler of Odd Fellows. 




l V/U/ILLIAM DAVIS, superintendent of 
y*)\/ the Portland Steamship Company, 
with which he has been connected 
nearly a quarter of a century, was born at 
Durham, Me., January 5, 1S27, son of Joseph 
and Sally (Vining) Davis. 1 1 is paternal 
grandfather, Isaac Davis, was a prominent 
member of the farming community of Durham. 
He held many offices within the gift of the 



town, and at the breaking out of the Revolu- 
tionary War he joined the Continental army 
and fought in his country's defence. lie died 
in Durham at an advanced age. 

Joseph Davis, son of Isaac, was also a native 
of Durham; anil, like his father, he tilled the 
soil for a livelihood. lie died in March, 
1872. His wife was a daughter of B. Vining, 
of Durham, a well-to-do farmer. She lived 
twenty years longer than her husband, dying 
in her eighty-fifth year, in 1892. She was 
a member of the Methodist church, of which 
her husband was Steward and class leader 
for many years. They reared five children — 
William, Wesley, Willard, Wendell, and 
Wiley. 

William Davis received a fair education in 
the common schools of Durham. In 1846 he 
began to learn the carpenter's trade in Port- 
land, serving as an apprentice under John 
Swett, who was then the carpenter for the 
Portland Steam Packet Company, which was 
organized in 1844. Mr. Davis was eighteen 
years of age when he entered the employ of 
Mr. Swett; and three years later he established 
a business of his own, taking contracts for 
joiner work on vessels. He finished the 
steamer "City of Portland " in 1866, and after 
she was wrecked it was Mr. Davis who re- 
paired and refitted her. In 1866 also he took 
the contracts of the International Steamship 
Company, doing the work on their vessels. In 
1S72 he entered the employ of the Portland 
Steamship Company; and up to the present 
time he has had supervision of all that com- 
pany's carpenter work, making extensive re- 
pairs, and building the "Pay State," the finest 
steamer running east of Portland. In the con- 
struction of this vessel he took a keen interest, 
superintending the work from the time the 
keel was laid till the steamer was put in com- 
mission. Mr. Davis is a first-class workman, 
and takes pleasure in seeing that every detail 
is finished with perfection. 

He has been twice married. His first wife 
was Ann Doughty, of Windham, who became 
Mrs. Davis in 1856. She died in 1881, leav- 
ing three children — Effie J., wife of James 
Skilton, of Bowdoinham ; Herbert W., an 
apothecary in Boston; and Velzora, wife of 
Edward Doughty, also of Boston. In 1S92 



!28 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



\h Davis was united to his second wife, Lu- 
cretia (Rook) Robinson, daughter of William 
Rook, -'f Durham, Me. 

In political matters Mr. Davis favors the 
Republican part)'. lie attends the Congrega- 
tional church and contributes to its support. 
lie lias a comfortable home on Munjoy Hill, 
which he elected in 1S64, and which has be- 
come dear to him through the associations of 
over thirty years. 



7T"t ATTAIN LEMUEL H. STOVER, 
I V-' Cashier of the Pejapscot National 
^^le Bank of Brunswick, Me., formerly 

a master of merchant vessels, was 
born in Ilarpswell, Me., March 6, 1825, son 
of Simeon and Lois (Hinckley) Stover. 

Elisha Stover, the father of Simeon, was 
born, it is thought, in Harpswell. He was 
a son of Alcott Stover, who was probably a 
native of old York, York County, Me., but 
spent the greater part of his life in Ilarpswell. 
Grandfather Stover followed farming in Harps- 
well, attaining the age of eighty years. His 
son, Simeon Stover, also engaged in agricult- 
ure on the old homestead in Ilarpswell, where 
he died at sixty-six years of age. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Lois Hinckley, was a 
daughter of Lemuel Hinckley, a prosperous 
farmer of Lisbon, Me. They were the parents 
of seven children, five of whom are now living. 
Mrs. Lois II. Stover died in Harpswell at the 
advanced age of eighty years. Both she and 
her husband were communicants of the Baptist 
church. 

Lemuel Hinckley Stover spent his early 
boyhood with his parents. At fourteen years 
oi age he left home to follow the sea, and at 
first secured a place on a coaster. By his 
faithful performance of the duties intrusted to 
him he won the attention of his employers, 
and he was promoted from time to time until 
he became master of a vessel running between 
Portland and the West Indies. He held this 
position for a number of years, after which he 
was placed in charge of a merchantman, mak- 
ing trips from New York to Europe, Antwerp 
being one of the points of destination on some 
of these trips. After twenty years' service as 
Captain, in 1859 he retired from the sea and 



took up his residence in Ilarpswell. In 1N71 
■he was elected Cashier of the Pejapscot Na- 
tional Bank in Brunswick, a position that he 
has since continued to fill with credit and 
honor. 

On June 1, 1851, Captain Stover was mar- 
ried to Miss Jane J. Sinnett, who was born in 
Ilarpswell, and is a daughter of Captain J. 
Sinnett, a ship-master. By this union Captain 
Stover has two daughters, namely: Mary I.., 
who married J. L. Orr, Captain of a fishing- 
vessel, and has one child — Ethel; and Lizzie 
M., the wife of Captain S. S. Dunning, who 
runs regularly to the East Indies, but has 
recently completed a tour of the globe. They 
have two sons — Herbert S. and Willis. 
After his first wife's death Captain Stover 
formed a second union with Miss Mary A. 
Stover, a lady of the same name, but not of 
the same family. This union has been blessed 
by the birth of two sons, namely: George H., 
sixteen years of age, a student in the high 
school; and Herman L. , also a pupil of the 
high school, in the class of 1900. 

In political affiliation Mr. Stover is a Demo- 
crat. He was Town Clerk of Harpswell for 
ten years, and he served four terms as a Rep 
resentative in the State legislature. He re- 
moved to Brunswick in 1871, and has lived 
here ever since. He is a Trustee of the Pub- 
lic Library and a member of the Historical 
Society. Captain Stover is Secretary of 
United Lodge, No. 8, A. E. & A. M., which 
was chartered in 1801, and of which he has 
been a member since 1872; is also a member 
of St. Paul's Chapter, No. 14, Royal Arch 
Masons; and of Dunlap Commandery, Knights 
Templars, of Bath. He is a communicant 
of the Congregational church. 




ILAS M. RIDEOUT, a retired car 
riage-maker, one of the oldest resi- 
dents of Cumberland, Me., was born 
in this town, February 7, 1S07. 
His parents were Reuben and Priscilla (Mer- 
rill) Rideout. Mr. Rideout is a descendant 
of Abraham Rideout, who emigrated from 
England at an early date in Colonial history. 
His son, Nicholas Rideout, was father to Will- 
iam Rideout, who was Mr. Ridcout's grand- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



229 



father, who was burn in Falmouth, Me., 
August 24, 1733, was the first ancestor of the 
family to settle in Cumberland, which was 
then a part of North Yarmouth. He was a 
farmer, and passed the rest of his life in Cum- 
berland, where he died May 26, 1799. His 
wife, Mary Blackstone, whom lie married De- 
cember 15, 1756, was a native of Falmouth. 

Reuben Rideout, Mr. Rideout's father, was 
born in Falmouth, October 10, 1775. He en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits, and, inheriting 
the homestead farm in Cumberland, resided 
there until his death, which took place Sep- 
tember 8, 1 8 3 8 . He was an industrious and 
practical farmer and a worthy citizen. In his 
latter years he supported the Whig party in 
politics. His wife, Priscilla Merrill, whom 
he married January 8, 1801, was a native of 
Falmouth. She became the mother of nine 
children, three of whom are living, namely: 
Silas M., the subject of this sketch; Luther, 
who was born December 5, 1808, and now re- 
sides in Garland, Me. ; and Hannah M. , born 
January 22, 181 1, who is now the widow of 
Franklin Taylor and resides in Garland. The 
others were: Joshua M., Reuben, Dolly, Mary 
A., John M., and Nathaniel. Mr. Rideout's 
parents attended the Congregational church. 
Silas M. Rideout received his education in his 
native town, considering himself fortunate in 
being able to attend school six weeks out of 
the year. He lived for a time with his uncle, 
and at the age of sixteen commenced work as 
a wagon-maker and a joiner; and, though never 
serving an apprenticeship at these trades, his 
natural genius for mechanical pursuits enabled 
him to become a proficient workman. In 1830 
he settled in Cumberland, where he engaged 
in the manufacturing of wagons and carriages, 
making every part in his shops from the raw 
material ; and, in company with his sons, he 
conducted that business successfully for many 
years. During his long period of activity he 
industriously applied himself to his calling, 
and has worked hard for the prosperity he now 
enjoys. In politics he supports the Republi- 
can party, and he is a member of the Congre- 
gational church. 

Mr. Rideout has been three times married. 
Abigail S. Merrill, his first wife, with whom 
he was united on November 4, 1832, died in 



1850. By this union he had four children, 
namely: Joseph M., a private in Company E, 
Seventeenth Regiment, Maine Volunteers, who 
died in the service from wounds received at 
the battle of the Wilderness; Silas \Y. , who 
died in infancy; Edward II., who was born 
August 27, 1833, and is now a carpenter re- 
siding in Herndon, Va. ; and Mary Matilda, 
who was born November 17, 1836, and married 
Charles A. Merrill, a prosperous farmer oi 
Cumberland. 

Mr. Rideout is now, March, 1896, in his 
ninetieth year, and is remarkably active and 
capable for this advanced age. Skilful in line 
cabinet work, he made his last table when he 
was eighty-seven years old, and still employs 
himself to some extent in making fancy boxes. 
A unique specimen of his ingenuity and taste 
in this direction is a table whose inlaid top 
of different kinds of wood is a map of the 
United States. 




DELP.HRT C. CHUTE, who was for 
several years engaged in the paper 
manufacturing industry at Cumber- 
land Mills, later serving as Deputy 
Sheriff of Cumberland County, was born in 
the town of Naples, Me., north of Sebago 
Lake, February 4, 1848, son of Captain James 
and Mary (Hoyt) Chute. 

Ancestors of the family were early settlers 
in this county; and Mr. Chute's grandfather, 
Thomas Chute, was born in Windham, Febru- 
ary 19, 1762. He was a farmer by occupation 
during the active period of his life. He died 
September 4, 1816, aged fifty-four years. He 
married Mary Mayberry, January 2, 1782, and 
reared a family of eleven children, of whom 
there are no survivors. They were named as 
follows: Francis; Sally; William C. ; James; 
Fanny; Margaret; Daniel; Mary; James, sei 
ond ; Thomas; and Curtis. 

Captain James Chute, Mr. Chute's father, 
was a native of Windham ; and in his early life 
he followed the trade of a cooper in Naples, 
Me. He later engaged in farming, an occupa- 
tion which he continued successfully until his 
death ; and he was highly esteemed as a worthy 
and useful citizen. He served as a Captain 
in the State militia, and at one time was a 



23° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



member oi the Independent Order of Odd 

Fellows. In politics he was a Republican, 
and he attended the Congregational church. 
He died July 30, 1884, aged eighty-two years. 
His wife, Mary Hoyt, who was a native of 
Salem, Mass., became the mother of nine 
children, of whom six are living, namely: 
Catherine, wife of Roscoe Mayo, of Naples; 
Charles A., who resides in Lowell, Mass. ; 
Andrew, Deputy Sheriff at Naples; Adelbert 
C, the subject of this sketch; Warren B. and 
Mary A., both residing in Naples. 

Adelbert C. Chute obtained his education 
in the public schools of Naples, finishing his 
studies at the age of eighteen years. He then 
went to the Alleghany Mountain region in 
Pennsylvania, where he was engaged in the 
lumbering business for two years, at the end 
of which time he returned to Naples. He 
next became employed in the S. D. Warren 
paper manufactory at Cumberland Mills, there 
rapidly familiarizing himself with the different 
departments of the industry, and for twenty 
years was connected with that enterprise in 
positions of responsibility, being engineer at 
the time of his retirement. He was appointed 
Deputy Sheriff under Sheriff True, was reap- 
pointed under the administration of Sheriffs 
Webb and Cram, and spent the last four years 
of his service in Portland, where he was sta- 
tioned especially to enforce the prohibitory 
liquor law. He was the officer who arrested 
James L. Welch, the Gorham homicide, in 
[894, and was the principal one employed to 
work up the case for the government. 

On January 11, 1873, Mr. Chute was united 
in marriage with Lizzie M. Jordan, daughter 
of Barzillai Jordan, of Cape Elizabeth, now 
South Portland. Mr. and Mrs. Chute have 
been bereft of one child, and now have one son 
Herbert E. , who resides at home. 

In social and fraternal circles Mr. Chute is 
very popular. He was a member of Temple 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of which he was 
Master for two years ; is a charter member of 
Warren Phillip's Lodge at Cumberland Mills, 
of which he served as Treasurer; and he is 
connected with Eagle Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons. He was formerly Noble Grand of 
Saccarappa Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of Westbrook, but withdrew from 



that body to become a member of the Lodge ;it 
Cumberland Mills, being elected to the prin- 
cipal chair during the first year; and he has 
been its Treasurer for the past thirteen years. 
He is also a member of Presumscott Valley 
l.mlge, No. 4, of Cumberland Mills. Politi- 
cally, he acts with the Republican party. 



"ir>»ARWIN INGALLS, for many years 
I I an esteemed and influential citizen 
^ Jl9y of Bridgton, Me., his native place, 
owner of the Ingalls homestead, 
which lies about five miles south-west of 
Bridgton Centre, was born on July 11, 1S22. 
He was a son of Asa and Phoebe Ingalls, both 
natives of Bridgton. 

His paternal grandfather, Phineas Ingalls, 
who was born in Massachusetts, in the town 
of Middleton, Essex County, November 14, 
1758, was the first of the family to locate in 
Cumberland County. While residing in 
Massachusetts, he joined the Continental 
army; and after the close of the Revolution, 
about 1783, he removed to the State of Maine, 
purchasing some five hundred acres of wild 
land in Bridgton. He devoted the rest of his 
life to clearing and improving this land, and 
established a fine homestead, which is yet in 
the family, having been handed down from 
father to son. Grandfather Ingalls was mar- 
ried in Bridgton, in 1783, to Elizabeth 
Stevens. They reared nine children, four 
sons and five daughters. 

Asa Ingalls, son of Phineas, was born on 
the Ingalls homestead, January 14, 1787. 
He, too, devoted his life to agriculture, the 
broad acres of his heritage affording him an 
ample income. He regularly visited the polls 
on election days, depositing his ballot in the 
interest of the Democratic party, but was not 
an aspirant for public office. lie died in 1852. 
In [816 he was married to Phoebe Berry, 
daughter of Elias and Jane Berry. She died 
in 1864. Mr. and Mrs. Asa Ingalls attended 
the Congregational church. They were the 
parents of the following children: Clarissa, 
who married Colonel John P. Perley; Henry, 
a practising attorney-at-law, residing in Wis 
casset, Me. ; Edwin P. (deceased) ; Darwin, 
the subject of this sketch; Mary, wife of 




DARWIN INGALLS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



233 



Benjamin B. Frost, of Ohio; Aaron II. (de- 
ceased); Laura B., widow of Edwin Fessen- 
den, of South Bridgton ; Aldana T. (de- 
ceased) ; Phineas B. (deceased) ; and a child 
who died in infancy. 

Darwin Ingalls acquired his education in 
the district schools and the academy of his 
native town. Shortly after leaving school as 
a student, he engaged as a teacher; and for six 
years he divided his time between teaching 
and farming, spending the winter days in the 
school-house, the summer in the pursuit of 
agriculture. In 1S50 he went West and re- 
mained a few months in Minnesota and Wis- 
consin, purchasing real estate in St. Paul and 
timber land elsewhere, which proved a good 
investment. During his after life he made 
many trips to the West, both on business and 
pleasure. After his father's death he took 
charge of the homestead in Bridgton, and de- 
voted much of his time to general farming; 
and under his intelligent management the an- 
cestral estate was at its best. Mr. Ingalls was 
a man of liberal and progressive ideas, which 
were further developed by his travels in the 
West; and he was a recognized authority on 
agricultural subjects. 

In politics also he took a leading part as a 
Democrat. He represented the district in the 
legislature two terms, was Selectman of the 
town of Bridgton a number of years, and held 
other offices of trust. His death, which oc- 
curred January 27, 1890, caused a sense of 
irreparable loss in the community. 

On May 30, 1S52, Mr. Ingalls was united 
in marriage with Mary J. Patrick, a native of 
Denmark, Me., daughter of James and Huldah 
(Berry) Patrick, and the following children 
blessed their union: Aldana T., a civil engi- 
neer residing in Wisconsin, who married 
Fannie Berry, and has one child, Marian E. ; 
George A., a real estate broker in Boston; 
Albert A., the father's successor as manager 
of the home farm, who married September 5, 
1895, Miss Laura E. Johnson, of Bridgton; 
and three children that died in infancy. Mrs. 
Ingalls is still living in the home where her 
children were born and reared. She attends 
the Congregational church, to whose support 
her husband liberally contributed. 

A portrait of Mr. Darwin Ingalls is shown 



in connection with the foregoing sketch. He 
was a worthy scion oi old Colonial stock, be 
longing to a family whose progenitors wen 
among the earliest white inhabitants of Lssr\ 
County, Massachusetts, and were connected bv 
marriage with other leading families of the Bay 
State. 




IANK WILLIAM SEARLE, M.D., 
a physician and surgeon of Portland, 
where, though his professional careei 
has thus far been a brief one, he is meeting 
with excellent success, is a native of Massa 
chusetts, having been born in the city of 
Lowell, September 8, 1854. His parents 
were Charles J. and Angeline (Scarlett) 
Searle, his father being a native of Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Charles J. Searle, who is now sixty-eight 
years of age, is an old "forty-niner, " having 
been one of a party of adventurous spirits who 
made the long voyage around Cape Horn to the 
new El Dorado in search of speedy fortune 
during the first year of the gold excitement. 
He had previously served in the navy depart- 
ment during the Mexican War. "After his 
return East, he married and settled in Lowell, 
Mass., of which place he is a highly respected 
citizen, having served for many years in 
various official capacities. His wife died in 
1866, leaving two children — Frank William 
and Charles J. Searle, Jr. 

Frank W. Searle acquired his earl}' educa- 
tion in the schools of Lowell, being graduated 
from the high school in the class of [872 
He then entered the City Clerk's office as 
assistant of that official, remaining thus en- 
gaged during the greater part of the succeed 
ing ten years. He was subsequently elected 
City Clerk, which position he held until there 
was a change in the controlling political party. 

In 1883 he came to Portland and entered 
the Portland School for Medical Instruction, 
and later on took a course of lectures at Bow- 
doin College, the State Medical School, from 
which he received his diploma with the 1 
of 18S9 after four years of study. Shortly 
after he went to Freeport, this county, and 
began the practice of his profession, remaining 
there three years. He then sold out and 



'-34 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



eel to Portland, and now enjoys a thriving 
practice in this city. His marriage with Miss 
Janet Johnson, a daughter of Archibald John- 
son, of Robbinston, Me., was solemnized in 
Portland, December 11, 1889. Dr. and Mrs. 
Sraile have hail one child, who is no longer 
living. 

Dr. Searle is a member of the Maine Medi- 
cal Association, the Maine Academy of Medi- 
cine and Science, and member and Secretary 
oi the Portland Medical Club. He and his 
wife are regular attendants and supporters of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 



(£JY<>HN T. MERRILL, who is success- 
fully engaged in operating a saw-mill 
in the village of Gray, was born in 
Poland, Androscoggin County, Me., 
February f>, 1832, son of John and Deborah 
(Atwood) Merrill. Mr. Merrill's paternal 
grandparents, John T. and Hannah Merrill, 
were early settlers and well-known residents of 
Poland. Their children were: John, Char- 
lotte, and James Hooper, all of whom arc now 
dec eased. 

John Merrill, father of John T., resided in 
Poland until fifty-six years of age, when, with 
his son, the subject of this sketch, he removed 
to Gray. He was an industrious, energetic, 
and useful member of the community, and 
highly respected for his many commendable 
qualities. He continued to reside with his 
son fur the remainder of his life, and died in 
1873 at the age of eighty-one. His wife, 
Deborah Atwood, whom he married in the 
town "f Poland, was a native of New Glouces- 
ter, Me. She became the mother of eight 
children, as follows: Mayhew C, who was 
born December 24, 1815, and now resides in 
Connecticut; George T., who was born Feb- 
ruary 28, 1 Si 7, and is no longer living; Char- 
lotte, who was born April 28, 1819, and died 
at Spirit Lake, la., in 1895; William D., 
born May 13, 1S24, and now living in Solano 
County, California; Charles Atwood, born 
April 20, 1826, and died in Springfield, 
Mass., in [896; James H., born November 2, 
1830, and now a resident of Chicago; John 
T., the subject of this sketch; and Francis 
A., born July 5, 1834, and also residing in 



Chicago. Mrs. Deborah A. Merrill died in 
1866, aged seventy-four years. 

John T. Merrill was educated in the com- 
mon schools; and at the age of eighteen he 
went to Portland, where he learned the carpen- 
ter's trade, serving an apprenticeship of two 
years and receiving fifty dollars per year. In 
1854 he settled in Gray, where he bought a 
farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits, 
which he followed in connection with his 
trade until 1S75. He then moved to the vil- 
lage and commenced operating a saw-mill, 
at the same time continuing to do carpenter 
work until 1880, when he established himself 
in a general mercantile business. After con- 
ducting both the store and the mill for twelve 
years, he retired from trade, and since [892 
has given his whole time to the milling in- 
terests. He operates the only steam saw mill 
in the village; and consequently he handles a 
large amount of business, and with profitable 
results. He is a staunch supporter of the Re- 
publican party, with which he has always 
voted; and, though not an aspirant for public 
office, he is interested in political affairs and 
is well informed upon the important issues oi 
the day. He is a member of Siloain Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Gray, 
and maintains a lively interest in the affairs 
of that Order. 

On July 1, 1852, Mr. Merrill was married 
to Frances H. Young, daughter of Nathaniel 
Young, a former resident of Gray. Mrs. 
Merrill's parents, who were prosperous fann- 
ing people, are no longer living. Mr. and 
Mrs. Merrill have had six children, namely: 
Ella Frances, who died in infancy; Ella 
Susan, who died at the age of eighteen ; Jennie 
Wilma, who is the wife of Henry C. Doughty, 
and resides in Gray; Willard L., who married 
Elizabeth Tufts, and is a successful farmer 
of Gray; Emma M., who married Dr. L. T. 
Cushing, and resides with her parents; and 
Alice S., who married Charles L. Dow, and 
lives in West Pownal, Me. These children 
have been well educated and are useful mem- 
bers of society. The family attend the Con- 
gregational church, of which Mr. and Mis. 
Merrill arc active members; and he has had 
charge of the choir for more than twenty-five 
years. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



235 




^ERRILL T. FILES, general mer- 
chant in the village of White 
Rock, Gorham, Mc. , was born in 
this town, January 31, 1823. Mr. 
Files is of English extraction, his paternal 
grandfather, William Files, having been the 
emigrant ancestor of the family. 

William Files left old England for New 
England about 1750, coming soon after to 
Cumberland County, which was then included 
within the limits of Massachusetts. He 
settled near Fort Hill in Gorham, being one 
of the pioneers of the place. Buying one hun- 
dred acres of land, which was in its primeval 
wildness, he labored with persevering energy 
to clear a farm, residing here until his death, 
at the venerable age of ninety-five years. In 
politics he was an old-time Federalist, and, 
religiously, was a communicant of the Episco- 
pal church. To him and his wife, whose 
maiden name was Gordon, nine children were 
born, Joseph, father of Merrill, being the 
youngest child. 

Joseph Files was born in Gorham in Decem- 
ber, 1767, was here reared to manhood, and 
here spent his active life, dying in 1S55. He 
was a farmer, owning a large tract of land, 
which* he tilled most faithfully, working early 
and late. He was an active member of the 
old Whig party and an influential citizen of 
this town. He married Annie Haskell, 
daughter of John Haskell, of Gorham, their 
union being solemnized in 1799. Thirteen 
children were included in their family circle, 
but of these only two now survive; namely, 
Ruth and Merrill T. Ruth Files, widow of 
Francis Small, of Raymond, reared four chil- 
dren, of whom three are living — Davis R., 
Howard T. , and Jane. The mother died in 
1862. Both parents were members of the 
Free Will Baptist church. 

Merrill T. Files obtained his early educa- 
tion in the district schools of Gorham, and ad- 
vanced in learning by a course of study at 
Limerick, in this State. In his boyhood he 
received practical training in agricultural 
labors, and after leaving school he worked on 
the homestead farm for many years. In 1865 
Mr. Files abandoned farming in favor of a 
mercantile life in the city of Portland, where 
he, in company with J. M. Plummer, opened 



a grocer) store, which they managed lor tun 
years under the firm name of Plummer & 
Files. In 1868 Mr. Files returned to Gorham 
and established a general store at While 
Rock, carrying a complete assortment ol the 
merchandise desired by his country customers. 

In the same year, under the administration 
of President Grant, he was appointed Postmas 
ter, holding the office until. 1875. He is a 
true-blue Republican, prominent in local 
affairs, and has often served his fellow-towns- 
men in official capacities. In i860 and 1861 
Mr. Files was one of the Selectmen of the 
town, besides which he was a member of the 
School Committee, and was again elected to 
serve on that Board. In 1S73 and 1874 he 
represented his constituents in the State legis 
I at ure at Augusta. 

Mr. Files has been twice married. In 1853 
he was united in wedlock with Martha Libby, 
of the town of Naples. She passed to the 
higher life in 1858, leaving one child, George 
Evans, who was born May 18, 1854; and on 
November 10, 1861, Mr. Files w^as again mar- 
ried to Mrs. Mary E. Merrill, a daughter of 
Deacon Samuel Meserve, of this town. Their 
union has been blessed by the advent of one 
child — Annie E., born January 2, 1864. Mi 
and Mrs. Files are active in church work, 
being connected by membership with the Free 
Baptist Church of White Rock. 



OHN O. A. JORDAN, who is actively 
and prosperously engaged as a tiller ol 
the soil at Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland 
County, Me., was born in this place 
3, 1849, being a son of John and Abigail 
(P'ickett) Jordan. 

Mr. Jordan's paternal grandfather, Thomas 
Jordan, was a lifelong resident of this State 
He was bred to the occupation of farming, 
which he followed through life, alter his mar- 
riage purchasing a farm in Cape Elizabeth, 
where he lived to a ripe old age. The maiden 
name of his wife, who was a native of this 
place, was Martha Fickett. She bore him 
four children. John Jordan, son of Thomas 
and Martha, was born on the old Jordan home- 
stead at Cape Elizabeth, and, with the excep 
tion of a few years, when he went to sea, "en- 



2 2 (> 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



gaged in the West India trade, diligently fol- 
lowed the independent calling of his father, 
to which he was reared. On October 3, 1835, 
he was united in the bunds of matrimony with 
Abigail Fickett, who became the mother of 
eleven children, of whom the following four 
yet survive: Simon F., burn October 12, 1837, 
a well-known farmer of this town; Melvin F., 
born November 24, 1S40, who subsequently 
had his name legally changed to Sawyer, the 
name of his mother's sister's husband, and is 
now a resident of the Cape; John Q. A., the 
direct subject of the present sketch; and 
Alvin A., bom November 17, 1853. 
Lewis G. Jordan, who was born March 29, 
1836, and married Susan R. Bragdon, of 
Poland, Me., has recently died. 

John Q. A. Jordan spent his early years in 
school ; and on the completion of his educa- 
tional course he turned his attention to agricult- 
ural pursuits, in which he has met with emi- 
nent success, having by tireless energy and 
progressive enterprise won position among the 
leading farmers of this locality. In politics 
Mr. Jordan is a sound Democrat. Relig- 
iously, free ami liberal in his views, he is not 
connected with any church organization. 




iSES M. CHAPMAN, a prosperous 
farmer and an old resident of West- 
brook, son of John and Hannah 
(McKcnncy) Chapman, was born 
in Dexter, Penobscot County, Me., January 25, 
1833. Mr. Chapman's great-grandfather, Ed- 
ward Chapman, was a native of Ipswich, 
Mass., who married Eleanor Small, of Lim- 
ington, Me., and, settling in Westbrook, 
became identified with the early settlement 
and growth of the town. Among his children 
were: Nathaniel, who served in the Conti- 
nental army (luring the Revolutionary War; 
and Simon, Mr. Chapman's grandfather. 

Simon Chapman was born in Westbrook, 
and in young manhood he studied law. which 
he practised to some extent; but the greater 
pari "l his life was passed as a farmer in his 
native town, where he died in 1845. He was 
an old-time Democrat in politics. He mar- 
ried Polly Jose, sister of Jonathan Jose, of 
Scarboro, and reared a family of seven chil- 



dren, three of whom are living, namely: 
Mary, who married, and is now a widow: 
Harris, who resides in Philadelphia, Pa.: and 
Hero, a resident of Passadumkeag. 

John Chapman, son of Simon, was born in 
Westbrook; and when reaching manhood he , 
engaged in the lime-burning business, which 
formed his principal occupation through life, 
lie resided in Dexter for some time, later 
moving to Danville, now Auburn, Me.; and he 
finally settled in Piscataquis County. He was 
an industrious, energetic, and worthy citizen, 
who applied his resources to the best advan- 
tage, and always enjoyed a comfortable pros- 
perity as the fruits of his labor. He died in 
1S77. He voted with the Democratic part)', 
and in his religious views was a Universalist. 
His wife, Fanny McKenney, was a daughter 
of Moses McKenney, of Scarboro. She be 
came the mother of ten children, six of whom 
are living, and are as follows: William: 
Mahala; Hannah; Moses M., the subject of 
this sketch; Joshua; and Jerome. 

Moses M. Chapman was educated in I lie 
schools of Scarboro, Dexter, and Danville. 
After completing his studies he was engaged 
in the construction of the southern portion of 
the Great Falls & Conway Railroad, upon 
which he worked for three years; and he then 
settled in Westbrook, where he has since given 
his attention to farming. For the past forty 
years he has made agricultural pursuits a suc- 
cessful business, and at the present time owns 
some two hundred and twenty-seven acres of 
valuable land situated in Westbrook and Scar- 
boro, his property being finely located and ex- 
ceedingly productive. He makes a specialty 
of breeding blooded Durham and Holstein 
stock, and also raises cattle for market con- 
sumption, to the extent of about thirty-five 
head annually. Besides these he raises some 
fine horses of Norman stock, having at the 
present time several good specimens; and lie 
lias secured a high reputation in that direction. 
He devotes some time to general farming, 
producing one hundred tons of superior hay 
yearly, and deals quite largely in milk. 

Mr. Chapman was married to Lydia B. 
Jordan, daughter of Captain Ebenezer Jordan, 
of Danville, on November 27, 1862, and has 
five children, four of whom are living, namel) ; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



237 



Napoleon B., who is in the grocery business 
in Portland; Geneva B., wife ol George Tal- 
bot, of South Portland; Manetta G. and 
Mason M., who reside at home. 

In politics Mr. Chapman supports the Dem- 
ocratic party, but has never sought for politi- 
cal prominence. He is deeply interested in 
the general welfare of the community, the 
moral and social improvement of which he is 
always ready to aid; and he attends the Uni- 
versalist church. 



-♦-•••-•— 




lLARENCE E. ALLEN, proprietor of 
the baggage transfer from the Union 
Station, Portland, was born in Gor- 
ham, Cumberland County, Me., 
April 15, 1853. Me is the son of George W. 
and Lydia (Lambert) Allen. His grandpar- 
ents were William and Maria (Chatty) Allen, 
of Falmouth, Me. 

William Allen was a well-to-do farmer in 
Falmouth, who lived to be seventy-six years 
old, his wife dying at the age of seventy-two. 
She was a daughter of Captain John Chatty, 
a soldier in the French War. Their son, 
George W. Allen, was born in Falmouth, Jan- 
uary 18, 1822, and there grew to manhood. 
In 1849 he removed to Gorham, where for 
some time he was engaged in farming, return- 
ing in 1 861 to Falmouth, where he is now 
living. He is a veteran of the Civil War, 
having enlisted in the Twenty-fifth Maine 
Volunteer Infantry. His wife was born De- 
cember 5, 1826, daughter of John and Eliza- 
beth (Alexander) Lambert, old residents of 
Falmouth. Mr. and Mrs. George W. Allen 
reared four children, of whom Clarence E. is 
the only one now living. In religious belief 
Mr. George W. Allen is a Baptist, .while his 
wife is a member of the Congregational church. 
Clarence E. Allen attended the common 
schools of his native town and Westbrook 
Seminary, and finished his schooling with a 
course of study at Gray's Business College, 
Portland. When nineteen years of age he 
went to work for M. Y. Knight, a grocer on 
( Moid Street, in whose employ he remained 
four years; and he then engaged for a while in 
the milk business. In 1879 he went to Boston 
to enter the employ of the Highland Street 



Railway. In 1884 he returned to Portland, 
and engaged in the express business on a 
small scale: and the following year he bought 
out James Neal, who had the Maine Central 
Railroad trade. This business was then easily 
handled, and Mr. Allen's single burse was 
able to accomplish all that was necessary. 
After the Union Station was built, the busi- 
ness increased, and another linn took up the 
same line; but they dropped out within a year, 
leaving Mr. Allen in sole possession of the 
field. From that time to the present his trade 
has yearly increased, and he now owns the 
largest transfer business in the city. Mr. 
Allen is a persevering and energetic man, who 
knows how to use to the best advantage the 
capabilities that win success. He has at- 
tained prosperity through his own efforts 
alone, and is deserving of the success which 
he has achieved. 

October 17, 1876, he was united in mar- 
riage with Alice E. True, daughter of Calvin 
S. and Alice M. (Anderson) True, of Port- 
land. They have three children — Ernest, 
Ethel, and Calvin. 

Mr. Allen is a Mason, belonging to Ancient 
Landmark Lodge, No. 17, A. F. & A. M., 
of Portland. He and his family attend St. 
Stephen's Church (Episcopal), to whose sup- 
port he contributes. They have a pleasant 
home at Deering. 



(^>r-URELIUS SCOTT JONES, a practi- 
p\ cal and well-to-do farmer of Scarboro, 
/j|A Me., was born in this town Novem- 

— ' ber 8, 1838, coming from pioneer 
antecedents. His grandfather, John Jones, 
was a native of Scarboro, his birth occurring 
November 6, 1775. He spent a part of his 
earlier life in Pownal, another Cumberland 
County town, but subsequently purchased a 
farm in this locality, and here carried on 
mixed husbandry throughout his years of ac- 
tivity, dying in 1S56. He was a man of 
robust constitution, and never afraid of hard 
work. He was active in advancing the relig- 
ious and moral interests of the community, 
and for more than forty years was a Deacon in 
the Congregational church. On October 20, 
1797, he married Lydia Wcstcott, of Cape 



238 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Elizabeth; and they reared a family of six 
children, William, the father of Aurelius S., 
being the fourth child. 

William Jones was born January 23, 1808, 
in the town of Pownal, where he resided until 
a young man, when he came to Scarboro, 
where he afterward engaged in general farm- 
in-, meeting with signal success in his under- 
takings. He was influential in local matters, 
serving as Selectman for some years. In re- 
ligion he was a Congregationalist, and con- 
tributed generously toward the support of that 
church. He was twice married, his first wife, 
Jane W. Sawyer, dying in 1857, and leaving 
two children — Aurelius Scott and Henry S. 
Of his union with his second wife, Mrs. 
Catherine F. Moody, ucc Libby, no children 
were born. Henry S. Jones, now a resident 
of Scarboro, was born here, April 27, 1842. 
He married Jane \V., daughter of Ebenezer 
Libby, of this town; and they have one child, 
Florence Ada, born August 25, 1871. He is 
a Republican in politics, and both he and his 
wife are members of the Congregational 
church. Aurelius Scott Jones was reared and 
educated in the place of his nativity, and on 
the home farm was thoroughly instructed in 
the agricultural arts, continuing beneath the 
parental roof-tree until the breaking out of the 
late Rebellion. In 1861 he enlisted as a pri- 
vate in the Twelfth Maine Volunteer Infantry, 
joining Company C, which was commanded by 
Captain Thornton, of Scarboro. Mr. Jones 
served in New Orleans on guard duty for nine 
months, and during that time was promoted to 
the rank of Corporal. On his return to Maine 
he located in Portland, where he was engaged 
in the trucking business for eight years, after 
which he came back to the scenes of his child- 
hood, and here took up farming on the old 
homestead. He has a snug farm of sixty-five 
acres, the larger portion of which is under 

! cultivation. It is amply supplied with 

substantial farm buildings and all the neces- 
sary equipments for carrying on farming oper- 
ations after the most improved methods. Mr. 
[ones is active in the Grand Army circles, 
being a member of Thatcher Post, No. ill. 

Mr. [ones was first married January 1, 1S64. 
to Martha Ellen Robinson, daughter of John 
Robinson, of this place; but their happy 



wedded life was of brief duration, her death 
occurring November 21 of that year. On 
January 15, 1867, he was married to her sister, 
Elizabeth L. Robinson. Two children are 
the fruit of this marriage, namely: Martha 
Ellen, bom February iS, 1869; and John 
Howard, born September 9, 1870. Martha 
Ellen married Royal E. Hudson, of this 
town; and they arc the parents of three chil- 
dren — Arthur Scott, Mary E., and Cora 
Belle. Mr. and Mrs. Jones are members of 
the Congregational church, in which he has 
served for some time as superintendent of the 
Sunday-school. 



OSEPH W. READ, who owns and oc- 
cupies a portion of the original home- 
stead in South Windham, Me., on 
which his grandfather, Noah Read, 
settled in the latter part of the eighteenth 
century, was born in the town of Windham, 
November 9, 1835. He is of English ante- 
cedents, being the lineal descendant of John 
Read, the son, presumably, of William and 
Lucy (Henage) Read, of England. John 
Read sailed from England with the large fleet 
that came to New England in 1630, and set- 
tled at first in Weymouth, Mass., but after- 
ward removed to Rehoboth, Mass., buying 
property there in 1643. He was a large land- 
holder, and quite prominent in local affairs, 
for some years holding the office of Constable, 
which was then the chief executive office. 

His son, Daniel Read, the next in line of 
descent, was born in Rehoboth in March, 
1655. He married Hannah Peck on August 
27, 1677; and they reared six children. 
Daniel, Jr., their second child and first son, 
was born in Rehoboth, January 20, 16S0. He 
and his wife, Elizabeth Bosworth, were the 
parents of sixteen children, Noah, Sr., great- 
grandfather of Joseph W., being the eighth 
child. 

Noah Read, Sr., a native of Attleboro, 
M;iss., born December 17, 1718, married 
Abigail Baldwin, who became the mother of 
eleven children. The eighth child, bearing 
the father's name Noah, as noted above, was 
born September 21, 1755, in Attleboro. lie 
married Mary Robinson, of Windham, Me., 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



239 



November 26, 1788, and they became the par- 
ents of ten children. He was for many years 
a teacher of the younger members of the So- 
ciety of Friends in Falmouth. He was very 
religious, and in 1800 was appointed an Elder 
in the church, an office which he tilled until 
his death, which occurred April 4, 1844. 

Nathan Read, son of Noah ami Mary 
(Robinson) Read, and father of Joseph W., 
was a native of Windham, born March 2, 
1795, and lived to the good old age of eighty- 
four years. He married January 28, 1824, 
Ruth Horton, a daughter of John Horton, of 
Portland. Of the five children who were the 
fruit of this union three are now living; 
namely, the subject of the present sketch and 
his two sisters. Emily H. Read, the elder of 
these, born August 30, 1826, is the wife of 
Isaiah Jones, and has three children — Charles 
W., Elmer H., and Frank; Julia W. Read, 
born September 1, 1831, is the wife of Nathan 
R. Dyer, of South Portland. 

Joseph W. Read acquired his elementary 
education in Windham, this being supple- 
mented by an attendance at Westbrook Semi- 
nary. In 1855 he went to Portland, where he 
worked for a time as a clerk in a retail grocery 
store, and then became clerk in the wholesale 
grocery store on Commercial Street of T. & 
W. H. Shaw, remaining with them during the 
year 1857. He was next employed for three 
years in the wholesale flour and grain estab- 
lishment of William L. Southard. In i860 
Mr. Read, still remaining in Portland, estab- 
lished himself in business, and carried on a 
substantial wholesale trade in groceries until 
1876. In that year he returned to Windham, 
moving on to the old homestead. In 1S89 he 
was appointed Postmaster for South Windham, 
retaining the office four years, two and one- 
half months; and in 1880 he was elected a 
member of the Board of Selectmen, in which 
office he served four consecutive years, being 
Chairman of the Board the last two years. 
Politically, he is a stanch Republican. 

Mr. Read was married July 9, 1863, to 
Ellen F. Jordan, daughter of William Jordan, 
of Portland. They have had seven children, 
but have been called to part with five. The 
two now living are: Charles W., born Febru- 
ary 13, 1866, employed by Chisholm Brothers 



in Portland; and Elizabeth Horton Read, 
born May 22, 1868, and now residing at South 
Windham with her parents. 



/"AHARLES PRITHAM, an enterprising 
I Vr-^ general farmer, residing in the town of 
^^Hs Freeport, was born in Old Orchard, 

Me., November 30, 1S39, tne son 
of Samuel and Matilda Pritham. He spent 
his early years in Old Orchard, receiving a 
good common-school education, and in [859 
accompanied his parents to Freeport. Like 
his father, he adopted the vocation of a farmer, 
which he has since followed. On November 
4, 1876, he was married to Mrs. Eleanor 
Robinson ; and they have two children — C. H. 
Pritham and F. J. Pritham. In politics Mr. 
Pritham is a Republican. 




M. STAPLES, one of the solid 
business men of Bridgton, was born 
February 8, 1855, in the town of 
Naples, Cumberland County, Me., being a son 
of Charles M. Staples. The father, for many 
years a resident of Naples, removed to South 
Bridgton in 1865. He married Miss Sarah N. 
Center, who became the mother of five chil- 
dren, two of whom died in infancy. The 
others were: the subject of this sketch and his 
two sisters, Mary E. and Annie M. 

Mr. Staples acquired his elementary educa- 
tion in the district schools of his native town, 
it being supplemented by an attendance at the 
Bridgton High School and the Bridgton Acad 
emy. He remained beneath the parental roof 
until attaining his majority, when he was en- 
gaged for a short time in teaching. Two years 
later Mr. Staples came to Bridgton, entering 
the store of an uncle, by whom he was engaged 
as a clerk until 1881. Having paid faithful 
attention to his duties while thus employed, 
he had become familiar with the details of 
mercantile business, and then started in trade 
for himself, opening a store for the sale of 
general merchandise and continuing about five 
years. Wisely investing his money in real 
estate, he during the first administration of 
President Cleveland erected the tine building 
in which the Knights of Pythias have their 



240 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



headquarters, and in which the post-office is 
located. In this block he has also established 
a stoic, which he devotes to the sale of gro- 
i ii ies and general merchandise, conducting 
therein a thriving and extensive business. 
During the summer season Mr. Staples, who 
is ever wide-awake and active, runs a steamer, 
the "Lady of the Lake," carrying pleasure 
parties on lake excursions. 

On November 20, 1SS1, the union of Mr. 
Staples with Miss Idalyn M. Gove was sol- 
emnized. Politically, Mr. Staples is a firm 
supporter of the Republican party, and for 
some time did excellent and appreciated service 
as Chairman of the Board of Selectmen; for 
three years also he was Town Treasurer. Me 
is prominent in social organizations, being 
a member of the Free Masons, the Odd Fel- 
lows, and the Knights of Pythias. He is an 
active worker in the Congregational church, 
ol which both he and his wife are faithful 
members. Generous and public-spirited, he- 
is ever ready to lend a helping hand toward 
promoting the advancement and prosperity of 
the community in which he now lives, and of 
which he is a respected member. 



7™V\PTAIN JACOB B. PINKHAM, a 
I jf popular member of the farming 

\U community of Harpswell, Me., 

formerly master of a vessel in the 
West India trade, was born near his present 
home, July 5, 1823. His parents, Elijah and 
Lydia (Willson) Pinkham, were natives of 
Harpswell, where his grandparents on both 
sides of the house were early settlers. 

11 is paternal grandfather, Nathaniel Pink- 
ham, was a native of New Hampshire, and 
was a farmer by occupation. Many years of 
his life were spent in Harpswell; and here his 
son, Elijah Pinkham, likewise followed agri- 
culture foe a livelihood, also taking part in the 
fishing industry peculiar to the place. He 
built a comfortable house and rounded out a 
useful lite of ninety years, his wife having 
been called to rest at the age of sixty-eight 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Pinkham attended the 
Methodist church. They were the parents of 
eight children, seven of whom are now living, 
namely: Joseph; Ann, wife of John Rogers; 



Nathaniel; Jacob B., the subject of this 
sketch; Jane, wife of Ralph Sinnett ; Almira; 
and Elijah J. Susan M. Pinkham died some- 
years ago. 

Jacob B Pinkham remained with his parents 
until twenty-one years of age, aiding his 
father about the farm and going with him on 
his fishing expeditions. When he attained 
his majority, he went to sea, soon rising to be 
master of a vessel. He was for thirty years 
Captain of a West [ndiaman, spending the 
greater part of his time at sea; and after a few 
years passed on the land he took charge of 
another vessel in the same trade, which he 
commanded until 1887. In that year he re- 
signed his position and settled in his present 
pretty residence, which he planned and 
erected. He has a fine farm of fifty acres at 
West Harpswell, overlooking the sea, where 
he can still enjoy the ocean breezes, and at the 
same time is surrounded by all the comforts of 
home life. 

On December 19, 1853, Captain Pinkham 
was married to Hannah A. Bartlett, daughter 
of Ballard and Annie (Rogers) Bartlett, of 
Phippsburg, Me., where she was born. Bal- 
lard Bartlett was a well-to-do farmer. Ik- 
died at the age of seventy-four, and his wife- 
lived to be ten years older. Seven children 
were born to Captain and Mrs. Pinkham, four 
of whom are living: J. Seymour, Captain of a 
one - thousand - two - hundred -and thirty-seven- 
ton vessel, married Fannie Pennell, of North 
Harpswell, and has three children — Seymour 
L., Nellie F., and Mabel; William V. , .1 
carpenter and joiner, married Carrie Riggs, 
of Lewiston, Me., and has four children — 
Florence A., Lloyd, Elsie, and Dwight; 
Howard assists his father on the farm ; Or- 
ville S., Captain of a nine-hundred-and-three- 
ton vessel, makes his home with his father. 
He married Helen Savage, of Dresden, Me., 
and has two children — Millard B. and Ber- 
nard Orville. 

Captain Jacob B. Pinkham is a prominent 
man in the ranks of the Republican party. 
Though in a Democratic locality, he was 
elected to the legislatures of 1 895 and 1 896, 
served on the Board of Selectmen from 1S90 
through [892, and on the Board of Assessors 
and Overseers of the Poor for the same length 













CHARLES STANWOOD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 43 



of time, being Chairman of the last-named 
body in 1891 and 1892. He is a member of 
the Try Again Lodge of Good Templars of 
Harpswell. In the Methodist church he has 
long been Steward and class leader and 
superintendent of the Sunday-school ; and his 
wile, who was a public-school teacher before 
her marriage, is one of the ablest Sunday- 
school teachers in the parish. Captain Pink- 
ham has all the characteristics of a genial and 
hearty seaman, and is very popular with his 
townsmen. 




(HARLES B. COTTON, an enterpris- 
ing and progressive agriculturist of 
Gorham, is a native of this town, 
the date of his birth being Novem- 
ber 5, 1836. His father, William Cotton, 
born in 180 1, was a lifelong resident of Gor- 
ham, being the second son of John and Eliza- 
beth (Chase) Cotton, members of the farming 
community. 

William Cotton industriously followed for 
many years his trade of cooper, but subse- 
quently engaged in tilling the soil, living, on 
a farm during his last days. He married 
Maria, daughter of Joseph Sturgis, of Gorham ; 
and they reared two children, Charles B. and 
Howard. The parents were members of the 
Baptist church, and the father was a Republi- 
can in politics. Both lived beyond the ap- 
pointed seventy years of man's life, the father 
dying in 1876, and the mother in 1S85. 
Howard, the younger son, born in December, 
1843, is a resident of Cumberland Mills and 
an active member of the Republican party. 
He married Hannah E., daughter of Daniel 
Billings, of this town ; and they have four chil- 
dren — Helen L., Canoll H., Maria A., and 
Ralph H. His wife and eldest daughter are 
members of the Methodist church. 

Charles B. Cotton obtained his education in 
the place of his nativity, and was subsequently 
engaged in teaching for several terms, being 
an instructor in schools at Stanclish, Wind- 
ham, and Gorham. Since that time, however, 
he has given his time and attention to agricult- 
ure in its various branches. Much of his land 
is under cultivation, and his farm is well 
stocked and well equipped for carrying on his 



extensive business after the most approved 
modern methods. His apiary, containing 
about one hundred and seventy hives of bees, 
yields him vast quantities of honey, which he 
markets in Portland and adjoining towns. 
He has a choice dairy, from which he manu- 
factures a superior quality of butter, selling 
it to regular family customers. 

Mr. Cotton was married October 25, 1862, 
to Lizzie E. Douglas, daughter of Freedom 
Douglas, of Gorham, where her birth occurred 
September 1, 1845. Of the eight children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Cotton, seven are living 
— Elmer S., Charles S., Bertha, William, Inez 
C, Walter M., and Ernest L. Elmer S. 
Cotton, born March 30, 1863, married in 
1886 May T. , daughter of Edmund Clement, 
of Cumberland Mills; and their only child is 
a son, Edmund C, born August 30, 1890. 
Charles S. Cotton was born March 5, 1866. 
Bertha, born February 9, 1871, is the wife of 
Dr. Bertelle F. Worthing, of Augusta. Will- 
iam Cotton was born February 20, 1873. 
Inez C. was born November 30, 1875. Wal- 
ter M. was born June 10, 1879. Ernest L. 
was born January 22, 1881. In politics Mr. 
Cotton is independent, having the courage of 
his convictions, voting for the best men and 
measures irrespective of party lines. In 
religious matters he exercises the same right 
of private judgment, being in faith a strong 
Second Adventist. 




HARLES STANWOOD, shipsmith, 
an esteemed resident of Woodford's, 
is busily engaged in all kinds of 
ship work belonging to his calling, 
his smithy being located at 310 Commercial 
Street, at the head of Merchant's Wharf, Pint 
land, Me. A native of Brunswick, this State, 
he was born June 17, 1828, son of William, 
second, and Nancy (Woodside) Stanwood. 
He is of English antecedents, his grandfather. 
William Stanwood, first, having been a son of 
Samuel and grandson of Ebenezer Stanwood, 
the emigrant ancestor. 

William Stanwood, second, was born in 
Brunswick, where he learned the trade of a 
ship carpenter, and was also engaged in farm- 
ing. He died in 1853; and his wife Nancy, 



?44 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



who was likewise a native of Brunswick, Me., 
and a daughter of Adam Woodside, lived until 
1SS0. They had a family of six children, the 
following being a brief record: Charles is the 
subject of this brief biographical sketch; 
Hugh Dunlap, who was master of the barque 
"Sea Duck," was lost at sea; William Henry 
died in 1893 in California; George resides at 
Cape Elizabeth ; Robert, also one of the crew 
of the "Sea Duck," was lost during a voyage; 
and James died in infancy. 

Charles Stanwood acquired a good common- 
school education in his boyhood, attending 
school in Brunswick and working on the farm 
until sixteen years old. He then began to 
learn the blacksmith's trade with Mr. Thomas 
Knowlton, agreeing to stay with him two 
years for thirty dollars per year and one 
month's schooling. Running away, however, 
before he had served his full time, he went to 
Bath, where he secured work with Anderson 
& Smith, shipsmiths, for whom he worked 
several months, receiving twelve dollars a 
month wages. He subsequently worked a 
short time for a Mr. Babb, who gave him 
eighteen dollars a month, being later employed 
by William Donnell, of the same town. Re- 
turning to Brunswick, Mr. Stanwood began 
work for Mr. George Woodward, at Schofield's 
shipyards, on the ship " Brandy w i ne, " con- 
tinuing there until the vessel was launched. 
He then came with Mr. Woodward to Portland 
to assist in finishing the ship, remaining here 
until the following winter, when he went to 
Bath to iron a ship, the "Ellen E. Stevens," 
lor Thomas Winslow, in Larrabee & Allen's 
yard. Going thence to Harpswell, Mr. Stan- 
wood ironed the brig "Mantanzas, " for Nor- 
ton Stover, afterward returning to Scovill's 
yard, where he ironed the "Sciota, " when that 
was finished going again to Stover's yard to 
iron the barque "Panama" and the schooner 
"Mayflower." Mr. Stanwood was next em- 
ployed on the Brunswick River, ironing the 
"Singapore" and the "Annie H. Kimball," 
later going to Bath to iron the ship "Union" 
for Thomas Howard. From there he went 
South in 1852, taking his crew with him, 
and ironed the ship "Neptune" for Carr, Page 
& Allen in Virginia. 

In 1853 Mr. Stanwood returned to Bruns- 



wick, where he worked for different people, 
ironing many ships, among them being the 
"Redwood," "William Woodside," "Sam 
Dunning," the "Daniel Elliott," and after- 
ward worked on various vessels, including the 
"Joseph Badger," the "State of Maine," 
ami two schooners. In 1856 Mr. Stanwood 
settled in Portland, working for three years 
for the Portland Company. In i860 he went 
to Aspinwall, South America, and was em- 
ployed for a time on the Panama Railway. 
Returning in 1863 to this city, he at once 
bought a half-interest in the blacksmith busi- 
ness of Fred K. Hatch; and a year and a half 
later he bought out the other half, continuing 
the business alone at the same location, 162 
Commercial Street, for a score of years. In 
1870 he tore down the old shops, and, in com- 
pany with his brother George, built the new 
ones. He has here ironed many barques, 
ships, schooners, and brigs, working for 
N. Stover, R. Lewis & Co., J. S. Winslow & 
Co., and Charles H. Chase; and in many of 
these vessels (here' designated by a *) he has 
had an interest: "Manuela, " the "Ella and 
Anna,"* "Ellen," "Tattay,"* "Archer," 
"Ella," "Sarmento, " "Samuel B. Hale," 
"Selina, " "Clara M. Goodrich," "Bruns- 
wick," "Samuel E. Spring,"* "Isaac Jack- 



son, 



"Rufus E. Wood,"' 



'Portland 



Lloyds," "Philena Winslow," "Carrie 
Winslow,"* "Ellen Crusoe," the "Annie 
Lewis," and the "Charles R. Lewis." 

Of Mr. Stanwood's union with Maria Ross, 
daughter of Robert and Jane (Woodside) Ross, 
seven children have been born, as follows: 
Charles W., a blacksmith; Robert R. ; Jane 
R., who died in young womanhood; Richard 
M. ; Georgie ; Janie; and Allie. In his po- 
litical affiliations Mr. Stanwood is an uncom- 
promising Democrat. In 1870 he served as 
a member of the City Council. In religion 
he is a liberal Christian, attending the Uni- 
versal ist church. 



HARLES C. WIGGIN is well 
qualified for the position of Town 
Treasurer, which office he has held 
in Freeport since 1 891 , being a man 
of good business ability, sagacious, and pru- 




BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



MS 



dent, and one whose cordial manner has won 
him many friends. He was born in Scarboro, 
Mf., on January 26, 1844, son of Ethan and 
Abigail (Front) Wiggin. 

Benjamin Wiggin, his paternal grandfather, 
was a native of New Hampshire, where the 
family name has been prominent from the 
early settlement of the State. He removed 
to Maine, and was among the successful 
farmers' of his day. He resided at Cape Eliza- 
beth for several years near the close of his life, 
and died there at the advanced age of eighty- 
one years. During the Revolutionary War 
he was a patriot soldier, rendering service for 
seven years. He was the father of three chil- 
dren — two sons and a daughter — all of whom 
grew up and two married. Ethan Wiggin, his 
eldest son, became a seafarer in early man- 
hood ; and during the forty years in which he 
followed his vocation he was commander on 
different vessels and visited many of the prin- 
cipal ports of the world L He then retired and 
spent his last years on a farm in Scarboro, 
Me., where he died in July, 1879, at upward 
of eighty years of age. In his younger days 
he was a Whig, but after the formation of the 
Republican party he became a supporter of the 
latter. Liberal in his religious views, he was 
an occasional attendant of the Congregational 
church. His wife, Abigail Front, survived 
him just one year, dying in July, 1880, at 
eighty-one years of age. Nine children were 
born to them, eight of whom grew to maturity, 
and five are still living, as follows: George 
Wiggin, who during the Civil War served in 
the United States Navy, being the Captain of 
the "Tennessee," one of the ships in Admiral 
Farragut's fleet, also Captain of the "Colonel 
Kinsman," now residing in Townsend, Del.; 
John Wiggin, of Scarboro, Me. ; Charles C. 
Wiggin; Mrs. Mary Means, the widow of 
Cyrus Means, residing at Old Orchard, Me. ; 
and Abbie P., the wife of Captain William A. 
McNulty, an officer in the late war, now resid- 
ing in Washington, D. C. 

Charles C. Wiggin remained with his 
parents until after he attained his majority, 
acquiring his education in the public schools 
of Scarboro. In 186S, at twenty-four years of 
age, he went to Culpeper, Va. , and for two 
years was profitably engaged in mercantile 



business. Returning to Maine at the end of 
that time, he was engaged in various lines of 
business in Scarboro until 18S0; and about 
two years later he settled in Fownal and was 
engaged in farming for three years. In 1885 
he removed to Freeport village, where he still 
resides, having since then for the most part 
been engaged in general farming, carrying on 
the land which_he owns in Freeport. He was 
married at Pownal, Me., on January 10, 1882, 
to Miss Mary A. Curtis, who was born in 
Pownal and is a daughter of Franklin and 
Statira B. (True) Curtis. Her ancestors were 
among the early settlers of Cumberland 
County. 

Mr. Wiggin is a loyal supporter of the Re- 
publican party. He is a member of Freeport 
Lodge, No. 23, A. F. & A. M., and of Harra- 
seeket Lodge, Knights of Pythias. In relig- 
ious views he is liberal, and his wife is a com- 
municant of the Baptist church. They reside 
in their fine residence in the village of Free- 
port. 



DVVIN A. BODGE, a public-spirited 
citizen of Windham, Me., his native 
place, has done much to promote the 
interests of this town, more especially of the 
village of South Windham. He was born on 
May 18, 1835. His father, the late Josiah 
Bodge, and his grandfather, Thomas Bodge, 
were both lifelong residents of Windham. 

The grandfather was a farmer by occupation, 
and in this healthful labor passed the active 
part of his seventy-five years. He married 
Betsey Mayberry, of Windham, and they be- 
came the parents of ten children, of whom four 
are now living, namely: Susan, wife of Thomas 
Smith, who has six children — Josiah William, 
George T., Melissa J., John A., Charity Ann, 
and Abner T. ; Andrew, who married Sarah 
Manson, of Standish, and has six children — 
Peter A., Susan J., Betsey, Sarah, William, 
and Clinton; John A., who married Esther A. 
Harmon, of Standish, and has four children — 
George M., Emily J., Henry W., and Edward 
M. : and Eunice. The latter has been twice 
married. Her first husband, Joseph Hawkes, 
of Windham, left her with one child, a daugh- 
ter, Harriet A. Hawkes; and by her second 



246 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



husband, William F. Sawyer, she also has a 
daughter, Ella J. Sawyer. 

Josiah Bodge was born March 29, 1805, and 
died in 1886. During his years of active life 
he was successfully engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, owning about forty acres of land. 
He was respected as an industrious and up- 
right man and a useful citizen. His first 
wife, Isabel Richards, of Cape Elizabeth, 
whom he wedded on August 16, 1831, died 
February 10, 1864. Four children were 
born of their union, two of whom are 
now living, namely: Edwin A., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and Ann E. Ann E. 
Hodge, born May 15, 1842, is the wife of 
Frank A. Cloudman, of Westbrook, Me., and 
has three children — Frank H., Cora B., and 
Andrew C. On August 8, 1865, Josiah 
Bodge married Mrs. Eunice F. Emery, widow 
of David Emery and a daughter of Elias 
Means, of Saco. Three children were born of 
this union, one of whom is now living, Joseph 
F. Emery. He was born in Clinton, Me., 
and after his marriage with Miss Annie Davis, 
of Portland, removed to Savannah, Ga., where 
he is now a resident. 

Edwin A. Bodge acquired his education in 
the public schools of his native town, and, 
like the majority of farmers' boys, early began 
to make himself useful at home. After learn- 
ing the shoemaker's trade, he followed it in 
connection with farm labors for nearly fifteen 
years, but has since given his whole attention 
to agriculture. An active member of the Re- 
publican party, Mr. Bodge has been identified 
with the best interests of the town since at- 
taining manhood, and has served his fellow- 
citizens in various capacities. From 1878 
until 1880 inclusive he was Town Collector, 
and the two succeeding years he was one of 
the Board of Selectmen. Socially, Mr. Bodge 
is a Knight of Pythias, belonging to Oriental 
Lodge, No. 17, of Windham. Religiously, 
he is a valued member of the Free Will Bap- 
tist church. 

Mr. Bodge was first married in January, 
1854, to Mary, daughter of Amos Hanson, of 
this place. She passed to the higher life 
beyond April 28, 1864, leaving no issue. 
Mr. Bodge was united in wedlock with Esther 
C. Haskell, daughter of Oliver Haskell, of 



Windham, on January 13, 1867, and they 
have two children, as follows: Mary E., who 
was born July 10, 1868, is the wife of Eugene 
Hawkes, of Gorham, and has one child, 
Esther M., born July 20, 1895; and Charles 
A. Bodge, born March 28, 1870. 




DWIN L. GODING, the well-known 
Treasurer and Manager of the Shaw, 
Coding Shoe Company of Portland, 
Me., was born in North Livermore, Andro- 
scoggin County, March 6, 1851, son of Ephraim 
ami Harriet (Bumpus) Goding. His father, 
who was a native of Livermore, was born July 
9, 1820, the year when the Missouri Com- 
promise Bill was passed, and Maine became a 
State. 

After moving to Portland in 1850, Mr. 
Ephraim Goding carried on the grocery busi- 
ness and afterward the fruit business for many 
years. He still lives in Portland, but has 
retired from mercantile activities. His wife 
was a native of Mercer, Me. She died in 
1892, leaving three sons, of whom the subject 
of this sketch is the eldest. M. R. Goding, 
the second son, is Cashier of Casco National 
Bank of this city. H. F. Goding, the third 
son, is now employed by the same bank. 
Jonathan Goding, the grandfather, was a 
farmer, who spent his life at Livermore, but 
his ancestors came from Watertown, Mass. 

Edwin L. Goding, the special subject of 
this biographical sketch, was graduated from 
the Portland High School in the class of 1867, 
and was then employed by C. II . Breed & 
Co., wholesale manufacturers of boots and 
shoes on Union Street, with whom he re- 
mained during their continuance as a firm. 
Mr. Goding has followed this business enter- 
prise through successive changes. The firm 
name first changed to Walden & Shaw, and 
later to Shaw, Goding & Co. In December, 
1873, they moved to the present location on 
Middle Street. In August, 1895, the Shaw, 
Goding Shoe Company was incorporated with 
a capital stock of one hundred thousand dollars. 

Mr. Goding, having been connected with the 
business since its foundation, is thoroughly 
conversant with all its details, and has proved 
a most efficient manager. This corporation 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



-M7 



employs one hundred and fifty hands, besides 
eight travelling agents; and their product 
supplies the best retail trade east of the Rocky 
Mountains. Mr. Coding is also Treasurer and 
Manager of the Casco Paper Box Company, a 
growing enterprise, which he in connection 
with other business firms organized. Besides 
this he is President of the Diamond Island 
Association, and is actively engaged in pro- 
moting its interests. He owns a beautiful 
summer residence there and a number of 
cottages and lots. 

Mr. Edwin L. Goding is a member of 
Beacon Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and was one of the charter members 
of the Portland Encampment. His wife, whom 
he married in August, 1882, was Marion S. 
Longley, daughter of John II. Longley, of 
Macon, Ga. Mr. and Mrs. Goding have three 
interesting children — Florence, Emily, and 
Margaret Goding. The family attend the 
State Street Congregational Church, of which 
Mrs. Goding is a member. 



smc, 



REGORY CROSTON, late an cs- 
\ «jT teemed citizen of Standish, Me., 

— where his widow, Mrs. Lucinda 
Paine Croston, still makes her home, was born 
in Ireland, October 1, 1829, and was a son of 
William and Sarah (Hawkes) Croston. He 
came to America when fifteen years of age, 
locating in Ellsworth, Me., and for many years 
followed the sea. He sailed at first as a com- 
mon sailor before the mast, but afterward be- 
came master of a vessel, and made many long 
voyages, going to nearly every quarter of 
the globe, becoming especially familiar with 
French and Spanish ports, much of his trad- 
ing being confined to the Mediterranean 
shores, but likewise visiting the important 
harbor towns of Cuba and South America. 

Mr. Croston was first married in 1S57 to 
Anna Clark, of Ellsworth. They settled in 
Portland, where two children, neither of whom 
is now living, were born, and where his first 
wife, Mrs. Anna C. Croston, died in 1861. 
Four years later, on April 18, 1865, he married 
Miss Lucinda Paine, a daughter of William 
Paine, who was a lifelong resident of Standish. 

Mr. Paine was born on January 12, 1796, 



and died November <S, [ 88 1 . For many years 
he was engaged in the cooper's trade. He 
was one of the foremost politicians of the 
town, being a prominent factor of the Repub- 
lican party, very active in town and count)' 
affairs, serving as County Commissioner from 
1854 until 1857, and during and after the war 
as Town Clerk and Treasurer for two years. 
For fifteen years thereafter he filled the office 
of Deputy Sheriff, being likewise a member 
of the Board of Selectmen; and from 1866 
until his demise he was Postmaster at Stand- 
ish. Religiously, he was a Unitarian. He 
married Louisa, daughter of David Otis, of 
Limington. Of their four children two are 
now living — Lucinda P. (Mrs. Croston); and 
Marcia A., wife of John D. Higgins. Mrs. 
Paine, now eighty-nine years of age, lives 
with her daughter, Mrs. Croston. She is a 
member of the Congregational Church of 
Standish. 

After his second marriage Mr. Croston, who 
continued his sea voyages, removed to Stand- 
ish, where he purchased the residence now oc- 
cupied by Mrs. Croston. Of this union two 
children were born, but both have passed to 
the life immortal. Mr. Croston died in 1S86. 
In politics he was a stanch Republican. Re- 
ligiously, he attended and contributed toward 
the support of the Congregational church, of 
which Mrs. Croston is a member. lie was a 
Master Mason, belonging to the Standish 
Lodge, and was also a member of the Marine 
Association of Portland. 




RANKLIN A. SKILLINS, an able 
and successful agriculturist, owning 
and occupying a large farm at South 
Portland, Me., formerly a part of Cape Eliza- 
beth, is a native-born citizen, the date of bis 
birth being August 22, 1853. 

Among the original settlers of Cape Eliza- 
beth were a family of the name of Skill ins ; 
and here Daniel Skillins, the paternal grand- 
father of Franklin A., was born May 31, 
1764, he being the fifth child and the eldest 
son of his parents. He continued to reside on 
the Cape during his entire life, becoming one 
of the well-to-do farmers and a valued citi- 
zen, doing his part toward promoting the 



-4 s 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



growth and prosperity of this section of Cum- 
berland County. He was an old-time Whig 
and a regular attendant of the Methodist 
church. His wife, Jane Johnson, bore him 
eight children, Silas, father of Franklin, 
being born on the present homestead, May 17, 
1 80 1 . 

Silas Skillins attended the pioneer schools, 
and from his earliest boyhood days worked 
on the farm, eventually succeeding to the 
ownership of the old homestead property. In 
1845 he erected a saw-mill on his place, and 
for ten years or more he carried on the manu- 
facture of lumber in conjunction with general 
farming. He followed the faith of his father 
in religion, but became a Democrat in his 
political affiliations. He married on Novem- 
ber 24, 1835, Miriam Ward, daughter of Na- 
thaniel Ward, of Kenncbunkport, Me. Of 
their eight children that grew to years of dis- 
cretion, five are now living, Franklin A. 
being the youngest child. The eldest, Lucy 
Ward Skillins, born August 18, 1836, died 
November 23, 1840; Daniel Ward Skillins, 
now a resident of Medford, Mass., was born 
August 11, 1838, and married Adelaide Gould, 
of Kennebunkport ; John Johnson, born Oc- 
tober 29, 1840, learned the trade of a house 
carpenter, and is now residing in Westbrook, 
Me., where he married Mary Ellen Trickey; 
Edwin Augustus, born June 23, 1846, died 
September 11, 1847; Hezekiah, born April 19, 
1S47, died September 14, the same year; 
Silas Edwin, now of Richmond, Me., was born 
November 12, 1848, and married Eunice Pur- 
rington, of Bowdoin; Augustus Eugene, a 
resident of Hartford, this State, born Febru- 
ary 8, 1 85 1, married Lois Anna Thompson, 
of the Cape. 

Franklin A. Skillins was the seventh son 
born to the parental household. He received 
his elementary education in the district schools 
of the Cape, being further advanced in learn- 
ing by an attendance at the Westbrook Semi- 
nary. Mr. Skillins has since been busily 
employed in agricultural pursuits on the home- 
stead farm. The' estate contains one hundred 
and forty acres, of which over fifty are in a 
good state of cultivation, yielding abundantly 
of the crops common to this part of the coun- 
try. By his personal integrity and his up- 



right dealings with all with whom he has 
business transactions Mr. Skillins has won 
the confidence of his fellow-townsmen, anil is 
everywhere held in high respect. Socially, 
he is a member of the Golden Cross, No. 379, 
and of Stroudwater Commandery, Knights 
Templars; and, politically, he is a supporter 
of the Democratic party. 

Mr. Skillins and Anna Belle Chaplin, 
daughter of Alonzo C. Chaplin, of this place, 
were united in marriage on November 17, 
1880; and their wedded life has been cheered 
by the advent of three bright and interesting 
children, namely: Harry Alonzo, born No- 
vember 12, 1881; Silas Franklin, born May 
5, 1888; and Howard Chaplin, born June 11, 
1893. 



EDEDIAH AUGUSTINE PRATT, of 
the Portland Paper Box Company, is a 
native of Poland, Androscoggin County, 
Me. He was born March 3, 1841, son 
of Jedediah and Sarah (Partridge) Pratt. His 
father was born and reared in Middleboro, 
Mass. He came to Oxford, Oxford County, 
this State, with his parents, and when only 
sixteen years old he enlisted as a soldier in the 
War of 18 1 2. His father, Aberdeen Pratt, 
tried to have him released from service, but, 
being unable, enlisted in the same company, 
both serving until the close of the war, after 
which they returned to Oxford. 

Jedediah Pratt was a cooper by trade, carry- 
ing on a substantial business at Poland for 
many years. He was much respected for his 
many sterling virtues, becoming quite active 
in local affairs, and served his fellow-towns- 
men in many ways, being Selectman, Justice 
of the Peace, and a Representative to the 
State legislature one term. His wife was a 
daughter of David Partridge, whose father was 
one of the original settlers of Poland. Six 
children were born to them, four of whom 
grew to mature years, namely: Louisa, wife of 
David Small, of Gray, Me. ; Jedediah Augus- 
tine; Aratus E., who removed from Maine to 
Massachusetts, and in 1885 returned to Port- 
land, where he died April 30, 1895, leaving a 
family of children; and Mrs. Climena Leigh- 
ton, who died, and also left a family. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



249 



Neither of the parents is living, the father 
having passed away when comparatively young, 
in 1847, the mother surviving him thirty 
years. Both were valued members of the Free 
Will Baptist church. Jedediah Augustine 
was but a child when his father died. He 
soon afterward removed to Falmouth, where 
he received good educational advantages, 
later serving an apprenticeship at the wheel- 
wright's trade. For some years Mr. Pratt 
worked at various mechanical pursuits, start- 
ing in business on his own account as a 
wheelwright or carriage-maker, locating at 
first at the foot of Deer Street and afterward 
on Federal Street. He was next employed by 
the government, having charge of the carpenter 
department of forts in Maine and New Hamp- 
shire, acting for five years as foreman of the 
men employed. Resigning his government 
position in 1876, he formed a partnership with 
J. P. Libby, with him engaging in the manu- 
facture of paper boxes under the present name, 
continuing about a year, carrying on the busi- 
ness in a modest way. Mr. Pratt then bought 
out his partner's interest, and soon afterward, 
in July, 1877, consolidated with his competi- 
tors, Ayer & Dodge, these three men being 
still associated at the present time, carrying 
on an immense business. This company has 
the oldest established box factory in the State, 
and during its existence has made many tons 
of boxes, which have found their way to every 
part of the United States. Mr. Pratt has ac- 
cumulated considerable wealth. He invests 
his means judiciously, being the owner of val- 
uable real estate; and recently he has pur- 
chased the large, double brick house at the 
corner of India and Newberry Streets. In 
politics he is a steadfast Democrat, but not 
an aspirant for official honors. 




|DWIN C. TOWNSEND, a well-known 
business man of Cumberland County, 
prominent also in public affairs, has 
spent the larger part of his life m P"reeport, 
where his birth occurred, January 23, 1834. 
His paternal grandfather, Seth Townsend, a 
native of the old Bay State, was a pioneer 
settler of Freeport, and for many years served 
in the State militia, holding a Major's com- 



mission. He was a shipwright and calker by 
trade, continuing in this occupation as long as 
able to work, attaining a ripe old age. His 
wife, Anna Curtis, to whom he was married 
January 10, 1S01, bore him eight children, five 
sons and three daughters, whose names were : 
Enos, Earl, Seth, Addison, Relief, Roxanna, 
Caroline, and Ira C. , of whom but one is now 
living — Mrs. Caroline Knight, of Woodford's. 
Major Townsend was a Whig in politics and 
a Congregationalist in religion. 

Addison Townsend, father of Edwin C. , was 
a lifelong resident of Freeport, where he owned 
a good farm, and was one of the leading busi- 
ness men of his day. He was an extensive 
dealer in wool and other merchandise, in 
addition to which he marketed all kinds of 
farm produce. He died March 8, 1891, at the 
age of eighty-three years, six months, and 
twenty-eight days, his wife, whose maiden 
name was Harriet B. Jordan, surviving him 
four years. She was born in this town De- 
cember 8, 1802, being the second child of 
William Jordan by his wife, Rebecca Orr, of 
Harpswell, and died on the farm where she 
was born, March 30, 1895, aged ninety-two 
years, three months, and twenty-two days. 

Four children, three sons and a daughter, 
were born to the parental household. One 
son, Emore T., died January 21, 1887; 
and Abbie A., the only daughter, died 
October 12, 18S7. The living are: Edwin 
C, the special subject of this sketch; 
and David ]., who occupies the old Jordan 
homestead, which has been continuously in 
possession of the family since July 8, 1778. 

Edwin C. Townsend completed his educa- 
tion in the old North Yarmouth Academy, 
which has a more than local reputation, after- 
ward fitting himself for a civil engineer and 
land surveyor. He studied civil engineering 
with Professor Smythe, of Bowdoin College, 
and had early practice with Charles J. Noyes, 
a civil engineer on the Kennebec & Portland 
Railroad. Mr. Townsend has done much 
surveying in this part of the county. He is 
also widely known as one of the early teachers 
of the county, having taught with great success 
for sixty terms, numbering among his pupils 
many who have since attained places of impor- 
tance in the literary world, in business, and in 



'5° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the professions. Mr. Townsend, who has 
always labored to promote the cause oi popular 
education, has but recently resigned his posi- 
tion on the School Board, of which he had 
been a member for fifteen years. In this his 
native town he has held all of the local 
offices excepting that of Treasurer, having 
been Clerk, Selectman, and Moderator many 
years and a member of the Board of County 
Commissioners in 1872, 1873, and 1874. At 
the present time he is a Trial Justice, and is 
also devoting his attention to surveying, real 
estate, and probate business, having a large 
practice, his ability and integrity being 
widely recognized. In politics he affiliates 
with the Republican party; and in religion he 
is liberal and consistent, believing in any and 
all systems of divine faith and worship that 
tend to improve the mental and moral condi- 
tions of mankind. 

Mr. Townsend has many ancient papers, 
plans, and records, valuable to himself as 
family relics and valuable to the community 
in which he resides. He is quite prominent in 
social circles, belonging to Freeport Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M. ; to Dunlap Chapter of Bruns- 
wick ; to Ligonia Lodge, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, of Portland; and to the East- 
ern Star Encampment of Portland. 

Mr. Townsend and Caroline Field, daughter 
of William 15. and Relief Townsend Field, of 
Freeport, were married on October 31, 1858, 
and their thirty years of wedlock were blessed 
by the birth of three children ; namely, Evie 
C, Fred M., and Anna M. Into this happy 
household one deep shadow has come, the 
mother having passed from earth October 16, 
1889, aged fifty-six years, two months, and 
twelve days; but the silent benediction of her 
pure and gentle life is ever present with the 
family. 




'LKNALD L. KEENE, a sagacious and 
enterprising farmer of Otisfield, was 
born in Oxford, Me., May 3, 185 1, 
son of Lemuel C. and Martha E. (Emery) 
Krone. His father was a native and lifelong 
resident of Oxford, where he was prosperously 
engaged as a tiller of the soil during the 
active period of his life, being known as an 



industrious farmer and a useful citizen. lie 
died October 21, 1865. His wife, Martha E. 
Emery, who was a native of Poland, Me., 
became the mother of four children, namely: 
William E. , who died Octobers, 1865; Fer- 
nald L. ; Anna E., who died August 13, 1S58; 
and Ida F. , whose death occurred September 
21, 1862 — the only living child being Fernald 
L., the subject of this sketch. The mother 
died October 29, 1865. 

Fernald L. Keene received his education 
in the common schools of Oxford; and, as his 
parents died when he was fourteen years old, 
he was thus early thrown upon his own re- 
sources. He found employment as a farm 
laborer in Oxford and the vicinity until reach- 
ing the age of twenty, at which time he went 
to Boston, and for the succeeding two years 
was employed at a public institution. He 
then spent two years as a car conductor, at the 
expiration of which time he secured a position 
as employee at the Massachusetts Insane Asy- 
lum in Worcester, where he remained for a 
like period. Returning to Maine, he pur- 
chased a farm in Otisfield, which he carried 
on for a short time, and then selling out went 
to Providence, R.I., where he passed the next 
two years as an officer at the House of Correc- 
tion. Thence he went to Meriden, Conn., and 
was for four years superintendent of the 
Reform School Farm at that place, capably 
performing the duties of the position. In 
1888 he bought his present farm in Otisfield, 
and has since resided here, being profitably 
engaged in agriculture, which he finds a con- 
genial occupation. He owns one hundred 
and forty acres of well-located land, upon 
which he has made various improvements; and 
besides general farming and stock raising he 
has for several years devoted some attention 
to the entertainment of summer boarders, hav- 
ing every convenience for their comfort, and 
having admirably succeeded in attracting and 
retaining their patronage. 

On May 25, 1884, Mr. Keene was united 
in marriage with Miss Kate Louisa Black, 
who was born in Devonshire, England, 
August 12, 1858, a daughter of James Gibson 
and Mary Elizabeth (Burnett) Black. Her 
parents, who were prosperous farmers in Eng- 
land, are both now deceased, her father dying 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 5' 



in 1866, and her mother in 1873. Alter their 
death she came to the United States to live 
with her sister, and was for some time a resi- 
dent of Keene, N. IT. She was subsequently 
employed at the House of Correction in Provi- 
dence, R.I., where she first met her husband; 
and they were married in Meriden, Conn. 
Mr. and Mrs. Keene have one son, William 
L. , who was born in Meriden, Conn., June 26, 
1SS5. Mr. Keene is a Democrat in polities, 
and has ably filled several of the town offices. 
Ilis society affiliations are with the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows in Worcester, 
Mass. In his religious views he is a Baptist, 
Mrs. Keene being an Episcopalian. 




|RNESTO PONCE, proprietor of the 
Granite Spring Cafe, 86 Exchange 
Street, Portland, Me., and also of 
Granite Spring Hotel and Casino on Long 
Island, Portland Harbor, was born in Santan- 
der, Spain, September 6, 1844, son of Thomas 
and Mary (Gontalis) Ponce. Mr. Ponce's 
father, who is still living, has always followed 
mercantile pursuits, and is at the present time 
a wholesale flour merchant in Santander. His 
family consists of five children, namely: Er- 
nesto, the subject of this sketch, who is the 
only one of them in America; Manuel, An- 
tonio, Maria Josefa, and Becenta, all of whom 
are residing in Spain. The mother died in 
1856. 

Ernesto Ponce was educated in the schools 
of Santander. At the age of sixteen, with the 
view of seeking his fortune in the New World, 
he went to Havana, Cuba, where he entered 
the employment of the famous cigar manufact- 
urer, Cabanas, with whom he remained for two 
years. He continued to follow that branch of 
industry, working for other firms for some 
time, and finally established a cigar manufact- 
uring business upon his own account in Ha- 
vana, which he successfully conducted for ten 
years. He then came to the United States, 
making the city of Portland his point of desti- 
nation ; and, after spending a year in seeing the 
country and obtaining a knowledge of the Eng- 
lish language, he here established himself in 
the cigar manufacturing business. He carried 
on a profitable trade for some years, during 



which time he accumulated considerable 1 ip 
ital ; and, being favorably impressed with the 
real estate interests as a good field lor invest- 
ment, he at length relinquished his former 
line of business and engaged in the buying and 
developing of unoccupied land. 

In 1876 he opened the Granite Spring Hotel 
on Long Island in Portland Harbor, and he 
has had the satisfaction of seeing his [dace be- 
come one of the most popular resorts in Casi 
Bay. The Granite Spring Hotel is located 
about six miles from the city; and Mr. Ponce 
owns about ten acres of land upon the island, 
and also the wharf known as Ponce's Landing, 
directly in front of the hotel. He has erected 
nine pleasant cottages for the accommodation 
of summer boarders, and also the Casino 
Theatre, which affords first-class amusement 
during the season. There is a finely' equipped 
bowling alley, with other attractive means for 
pleasure and exercise; and the grounds are 
tastefully laid out. The development of this 
property has necessarily required a heavy out- 
lay, but the popularity of the house and its 
proprietor is sufficient to insure profitable 
returns for the investment. 

The resort is easily reached by a regular line 
of fast steamers. Not the least attractive 
feature of the spot is the well-known Granite 
Spring, the water of which is said to rival that 
of the famous Poland Spring in its curative 
power; and it has been aptly said that, "while 
Ponce de Leon went to Florida in quest of the 
fountain of youth and found malaria, Ponce 
of Exchange Street went to Long Island in 
quest of the fountain of health and found the 
Granite Spring." Mr. Ponce is doing a large 
and profitable business at his Granite Spring 
Cafe, 86 Exchange Street, and is also renew- 
ing his former success as a dealer in fine 
cigars. He is a Democrat in politics. 




UFUS K. JORDAN is the efficient 
superintendent of George II. Ray- 
mond's foundry in Westbrook. lie 
was born in this city, November 28. 
1863, son of George D. and Elizabeth C. 
(Bixby) Jordan. His grandfather, Israel Jor- 
dan, was a native of Gray, Me., and in early 
life became a sea captain, being engaged prin- 



252 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



cipally in the West India trade. Me finally 
abandoned the sea, and, settling upon a farm 
in Gray, there passed the rest of his life. He 
was an esteemed and useful citizen, and he and 
his wife reared a family of two children. 

George D. Jordan, father of Rufus K., was 
born in Gray, and, when a young man, learned 
the shoemaker's trade, which he followed for 
some time. He subsequently engaged in car- 
pentering, and for some years was employed at 
S. D. Warren's paper manufactory at Cumber- 
land Mills as general repairer. He was after- 
ward watchman at the mills, but after a ser- 
vice of three years in that capacity was forced 
to retire on account of failing health; and he 
died in 1882. He was twice married. His 
first wife, by maiden name Sally Tower, be- 
came the mother of two children. His second 
wife, Elizabeth C. Bixby, had but one child, 
Rufus K. 

Rufus K. Jordan was educated in the public 
schools of Westbrook ; and, after completing 
his course there, he studied civil engineering 
with S. L. Stevenson, of Gorham, Me., under 
whose direction he worked for about six years. 
He then spent six months in surveying the 
mountain division of the Maine Central Rail- 
road system, during which time he had charge 
of the work; and upon finishing operations for 
the company he returned to Westbrook. He- 
was next employed, under contract, in conduct- 
ing the foundry department of George H. Ray- 
mond's machine works, an undertaking which 
he ably carried on for two years, at the expira- 
tion of that time accepting the post of super- 
intendent of the foundry, a position he has 
capably filled for the past four years. He has 
a thorough knowledge of the business; and, as 
he possesses executive ability of a high order, 
he is a valuable acquisition to the enterprise. 

In 1885 Mr. Jordan was united in marriage 
to Iva B. Ouimby, a daughter of George 
Ouimby, who died in 1877. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jordan have two children — George K., who is 
attending school in Westbrook; and Carrie 
M., an infant. In politics Mr. Jordan is a 
Democrat; but, although taking a deep interest 
in public affairs, he has no political aspira- 
tions. He is a favorite socially, being a mem- 
ber of Wahmenock Tribe, No. 35, Imperial 
Order of Red Men; and he readily gives his 



support to any movement for the general im- 
provement of the community. Both he and 
his wife attend the Concrrejrational church. 



1FTTOHN FARWELL ANDERSON, who 
died in Portland, Christmas Day, 1887, 
was a man of remarkable ability and 
sterling character. He was born Jul) 
22, 1S23, in Portland, in the house on Con- 
gress Street now numbered 633. He was 
the son of the Hon. John Anderson and his 
wife, Ann Williams Jameson, and through 
both father and mother was of Scotch-Irish 
descent. The following biographical sketch 
is abridged from the interesting memoir by 
the Rev. George M. Bodge, published in the 
New England Historical and Genealogical 
Register for April, 1889. 

His first ancestor on the paternal side in 
this country was John Anderson, a Scotch- 
Irish immigrant, who married in Watertown, 
Mass., July 16, 1706, Rebecca Waight. 
Their son Abraham, who was born August 18, 
1708, was a pioneer of New Marblehead, now 
Windham, Me., and cleared and improved a 
farm near the centre of the town. This farm 
is still in the family, and has been enlarged 
and improved by each succeeding generation. 
Abraham Anderson was a man of great in- 
fluence in the development of the new town : 
and after its incorporation he was the first 
Representative to the General Court, in 1767- 
68. He died in 1769. 

Abraham, Jr., his successor in the owner- 
ship of the homestead, was his youngest son 
by his second wife, Mrs. Ann Colin Cloutman, 
widow of Edward Cloutman, of Gorham, who 
was taken by the Indians in 1746, and died in 
captivity. Abraham, the younger, possessed 
much of his father's energy and ability. He 
married Lucy, daughter of the Rev. Peter 
Thacher Smith and grand-daughter of the 
Rev. Thomas Smith, the first minister of 
Falmouth, now Portland; and they had seven 
children. Their third son, John, who was 
born July 29, 1792, was the father of the 
special subject of this sketch. 

John_ Anderson was graduated from Bowdoin 
College in the class of 1813, studied law in the 
office of Stephen Longfellow in Portland, was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



253 



admitted to the Cumberland bar in 1816, and 
at once entered upon a prosperous practice. 
He became actively engaged in politics, and 
in 1824 was elected representative to Con- 
gress, holding his seat through repeated re- 
elections till 1S33. From 1833 to 1836 he 
was United States District Atorney, and in 
the latter year was made Collector of Portland. 
On the retirement of Mr. Bancroft from the 
office of Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Anderson 
was offered the appointment, but declined. 
He was twice Mayor of Portland, and was in- 
fluential in securing the construction of the 
Atlantic & St. Lawrence Railroad. His char- 
acter and qualifications made him a leader 
among men, and his courtesy and manly bear- 
ing won him a host of friends. September 23, 
1822, he married Ann Williams Jameson, 
daughter of Captain Samuel and Ann (Hitch- 
borne) Jameson, the former of Freeport, Me., 
the latter of Boston. Mrs. Anderson, it is 
said, "was a woman of rare beauty and intel- 
lect, whose brilliant social qualities and wide 
benevolence added greatly to her husband's 
success in life and to the happiness of all 
who knew her." John Farvvell was their eld- 
est son. 

John Farwell Anderson first studied at the 
old Portland Academy under Principal Bezaleel 
Cushman, and, when about nine years of age, 
was sent with his brother, Samuel J. (after- 
ward General Anderson), to a private home 
school at Cape Elizabeth. Later he again at- 
tended school at Portland, and in 1S38 and 
1839 studied at Gorham Academy. In 1839 
Mr. Anderson took up the study of civil en- 
gineering, completing his course at Tyngs- 
boro, Mass., under Captain Green of the regu- 
lar army, and in 1843 was appointed assistant 
engineer on the Commission of the North- 
eastern Boundary Survey, established by the 
Webster and Ashburton Treaty to trace the 
boundary line between the American and 
British possessions. The scientific corps of 
the United States was in charge of Colonel 
James D. Graham. 

Mr. Anderson was appointed first assistant 
to Mr. Folliot Thornton Lally, whose head- 
quarters were at Houlton, Me. ; and the next 
year he was assigned to the party under Alex- 
ander W. Longfellow. Their section of the. 



line was to he laid along Hall's Stream 
through an unbroken wilderness, and marked 
with mile posts of cast iron; and a party of 
wood choppers had to go forward and cut a 
range way. All supplies for the engineering 
party were carried from Canaan, Vt. , on the 
backs of men employed for the purpose, called 
"sackers." Each day the engineers moved 
the line along the river, and each night 
pitched their tent upon a new spot, sleeping 
upon beds of boughs. The wild freedom of 
the woods was in harmony with the broad free 
nature of the young man, and doubtless con- 
firmed him in the pursuit of his arduous call- 
ing. 

In the year 1846 and in the winter of 1847 
Mr. Anderson was employed in the Washing- 
ton office of the Commission, and while there 
■he was introduced to the highest social circles, 
enjoying the personal friendship of President 
Polk, who had been a warm friend of his 
father while they were in Congress together, 
and was cordially received in the inner circle 
of the household of Mrs. Polk, who had been 
an intimate friend of his mother. In March, 
1847, he left Washington to return to his native 
city, to which he was deeply attached. He 
was engaged as assistant civil engineer on the 
Androscoggin & Kennebec and the Portland 
& Kennebec Junction Railroads, in 1850 was 
appointed assistant engineer of the York & 
Cumberland Railroad; and from 185 1 to 1853 
he was chief engineer and acting superintend- 
ent of that road. In 1852 he was city engineer 
of Portland. 

In August, 1853, his father died, leaving to 
him the old homestead, one of the best farms 
in Cumberland County. Mr. Anderson at 
once began to improve and enlarge the farm, 
of which he made a most beautiful estate; ami 
his neighborly relations with the farmers of 
the vicinity, whom he was always ready to 
help and encourage, made him much beloved. 
The influence of his example was soon evident 
in the improvement of other farms, especially 
in the impulse given to stock breeding by his 
handsome herd of Devonshire cattle, the finest 
in New England. In 1858 he was chosen a 
member of the State Board of Agriculture for 
the County of Cumberland for three years, 
and the last year was made Vice-President of 



-5-1 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Board; and he was its President in [864, 
1S65, and 1866. 

In 1867 he was persuaded to leave the farm 
to take the position of chief engineer of the 
I 'ml land & Rochester Railroad; and in 1869 
he was appointed chief engineer of the Port- 
land & Ogdensburg Railroad, the building of 
which gave for the first time full scope to his 
powers, his achievements on that line being the 
admiration of experts. The ability which he 
displayed in solving the difficult problem of 
the passage through the White Mountains is 
thus spoken of by Professor George L. Vose: 
"I doubt if even his fellow-townsmen fully 
appreciate the professional skill shown by Mr. 
Anderson in the location and construction of 
the Ogdensburg Railroad through the Crawford 
Notch. The work has marked him as one of 
the best railroad engineers, not only in this 
country, but in the world. The plans and re- 
ports of that work have become a regular part 
of the course of instruction in the best Euro- 
pean technical schools. . . . There are many 
places on the road . . . where an error of a 
dozen feet in the position of the line would 
easily have quadrupled the cost." 

In 1873 Mr. Anderson was appointed by the 
Governor Railroad Commissioner of Maine, 
and that office he retained during life. In 
1884 President Nickerson of the California 
Southern Railroad Company engaged Mr. 
Anderson as special engineer to examine the 
roads and estimate the damage caused by 
recent floods; and he was absent on this duty 
one month, travelling night and day, doing 
his work thoroughly and efficiently, and making 
valuable suggestions for guarding against 
future Hoods. In 1886, as chief engineer, he 
directed the building of the Bangor & Piscata- 
quis Railroad to Moosehead Lake. 

Mr. Anderson was married to Miss Marcia 
Bowman Winter, daughter of Captain Samuel 
Winter, of Portland, an adopted daughter of 
Dr. John Merrill, of this city, on March 30, 
[8 17, and the following children were born of 
their union: Anne Hitchborn, who married 
Charles W. Lord; Marcia Winter, who was 
twice married, her first husband being F. J. 
Edrnands, her second E. G. Spring; Isabel 
Merrill, who died in infancy; and Frances 
Perley, who married Charles Thornton Davis. 



Mrs. Anderson is a lady of rare culture and 
amiable disposition. 

Mr. Anderson was a strong and lifelong 
Democrat, but never entered active politics. 
He took great pleasure in antiquarian and his- 
torical studies, and was a diligent collector of 
genealogical data, especially of the old Wind- 
ham families, and records and relies of local 
history. He was a valued member of the 
Maine Historical Society, and als 1 of the 
New England Historic Genealogical Society. 
Of the former organization he was the first 
President, and he was active in its formation; 
and with his friend, Mr. S. M. Watson, as edi- 
tor and publisher, he was instrumental in es- 
tablishing the Maine Genealogical Recorder, to 
which he contributed much valuable matter. 

In closing this sketch, we quote again from 
Professor Vose: "Always devoted to his pro- 
fession, tireless in carrying out the details of 
his work, when the time came for rest he was 
the most genial of companions. Fond of a 
good story and eminently able to tell one, he 
has been the life of many an engineering part} 
around the camp fire, and has beguiled, many 
an hour on the stage top by his unbounded 
cheerfulness. For myself, I feel that I have 
lost one whose opinion upon professional 
matters has never failed me, and one of my 
best and oldest friends." Mr. Anderson's 
mortal remains lie in the old Anderson Ceme- 
tery at Windham in the family tomb, where 
rests the dust of three generations of his an- 
cestors. 



OSEPH S. WEBSTER, an esteemed 
citizen and one of the leading business 
men of the town of Standish, was born 
February 5, 1835, in this town, being 
a son of Joseph and Mary (Smith) Webster. 
His grandfather, Thomas Webster, was at one 
time one of the wealthiest residents of Port- 
land, being the owner of a large number oi 
vessels, many of which were captured by the 
French. He was three times married. He 
died in Portland at the age of seventy years. 
His son, Joseph Webster, was born in Port- 
land in 1799, and was there bred and edu- 
cated. In early life he removed to Standish, 
and engaged in mercantile business at' Sebago 




'J 



i 



\ 








JACOB P. SHATTUCK. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



257 



Lake, where he spent his remaining years, 
living in I S69. Mis wife, Mary, daughter of 
Ephraim Smith, of Gorham, this county, bore 
him five children, of whom but two are now 
living — Richard Stone Webster ami Joseph S. 
Webster, both unmarried. 

Joseph S. Webster acquired a substantial 
education in the schools of Standish, going 
from this place to Portland, where he was em- 
ployed as a clerk for some time. In 1857 he 
unit to Minneapolis, Minn., making that city 
his place of residence for six years. Return- 
ing then to the scenes of his early life, he 
settled in Standish, and has since resided here. 
In 1S70 Mr. Webster established himself in 
business at Sebago Lake; and in the following 
year he built his present store, which he has 
conducted with great success, having an exten- 
sive and lucrative trade. In politics he 
affiliates with the Republican party. He is 
a regular attendant of the Congregational 
church, toward the support of which he con- 
tributes liberally. He is also a member of 
the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Standish 
Lodge, No. 70. 



(Eft ACOB PARKER SHATTUCK, a suc- 
cessful and extensive agriculturist and 
a respected citizen of East Deering, 
Cumberland County, Me., is a Massa- 
chusetts man by birth and breeding, having 
been born March 27, 1 82 1, in the town of 
Groton, Middlesex County. He comes of 
ancient Colonial stock, whose emigrant pro- 
genitor settled in Watertown, Mass., as early 
as 1640. Mr. Shattuck's grandfather, Cap- 
tain Job Shattuck, of Groton, served his 
country valiantly in the Revolution, being- 
energetic in raising recruits and taking an ac- 
tive part in several campaigns. A few years 
later he was a leader in Shays's Rebellion. 
(See "History of Groton, Mass.") 

William Shattuck, father of Jacob, was 
born November 16, 1786, in Groton Centre, 
Mass., being the eldest of a family of seven 
children. He was educated in the district 
schools of his native town, and was trained to 
agricultural work on the parental farm. He 
was but a youth when his father died; and he 
was left with the care of the farm, and his 



widowed mother and her young family to look 
alter, the heavy duties thus devolving upon 
him being in practical matters faithfully per- 
formed. Possessing unusual capabilities, a dis- 
cerning mind, and a sound judgment, he became 
one of the most influential men in the town. 
An ardent Democrat, he took a very promi- 
nent part in local politics, for several years 
serving as Selectman and on the Town Com- 
mittee, besides which he was a Representative 
in the State legislature a number of terms. 
He was a very decided and outspoken oppo- 
nent of all secret societies, having an espe- 
cial antipathy for the Masonic Order, and, 
though a sincere Christian, refused to unite 
with the church, as members of secret or- 
ganizations were there admitted to member- 
ship. He married Sarah, daughter of Jacob 
Parker, of Groton, and to them nine children 
were born, namely : Frances, wife of George 
May, of Lancaster, Mass.: Jacob Parker; 
Antoinette, wife of Frank Nutting, of Otis- 
field, Me.; William; Mary Jane; Charles; 
Sarah, wife of Samuel Shattuck; Eugene; and 
Josephine, the wife of the Rev. Lucius Smith, 
D.D., for many years editor of the Watch- 
man. Mrs. Sarah P. Shattuck was a woman 
of cultivation and refinement, and, like her 
husband, was a devoted Christian. 

Jacob P. Shattuck was educated in the com- 
mon schools and at the Lawrence Academy in 
Groton, and on his leaving school, at the age 
of eighteen years, his father gave him his 
time. The following year he worked for his 
father on the home farm, going then to Bos- 
ton, where he was employed for two years on 
a dredging machine. He walked from Boston 
to Groton to cast his first vote, the candidate 
for whom he voted being George S. Boutwell. 
In the fall of that year, with the money saved 
while working on the dredger, Mr. Shattuck 
bought a yoke of oxen and a horse; and with 
these he filled a contract of carting for James 
Farnsworth. The succeeding spring he sold 
his oxen and horse, and resumed his former 
occupation in Boston, remaining there another 
two years. Mr. Shattuck then followed the 
tide of emigration westward, going to Athens, 
Ohio, where he purchased a tract of unim- 
proved land, on which he reared a log house, 
and then began the task of redeeming a farm 



'■5* 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



from the primeval forest. In those days the 
pioneers used to" smoke their bacon and hams 
by placing them in a barrel, which they sus- 
pended over a fire. One day, leaving his 
hams smoking, Mr. Shattuck started out with 
a yoke of oxen to build a road; and on his re- 
turn his log cabin and all that it had con- 
tained were in ashes. He subsequently rebuilt 
the cabin, and then purchased three hundred 
and sixty acres more of land; but the hardships 
of this life proved too much for his constitu- 
tion, and broken in health he returned East. 

In 1849 Mr. Shattuck came to this State, 
securing work in Portland on a dredger run by 
five horses. Soon after, going to Boston, 
through the influence of John B. Brown, he 
bought a steam dredger, with which he re- 
turned to Portland, where he did a large 
amount of work for the Maine Central Railway 
Company. Mr. Shattuck also did between 
eighty and ninety thousand dollars' worth of 
dredging in Portland Harbor, in order that the 
"Great Eastern" might be brought into this 
port. He continued in this profitable business 
until 1864, when he returned to his property 
in Ohio. There he built a steam saw-mill, 
which cost him fourteen thousand five hun- 
dred dollars, and began sawing the timber on 
his land; but, before he had much headway, 
his mill was burned to the ground, the loss 
being total, as he had no insurance. He then 
sold the mill site, and gave the remainder of 
the property to his brother Eugene, returning 
with his wife and son in 1868 to Portland, 
subsequently settling in Deering, on the farm 
which he had purchased in 1858, and where he 
has since resided. This farm contains two 
hundred and fifty acres of land, the most of 
which is under cultivation. He annually 
raises large crops of hay, the yield usually 
exceeding a hundred tons. Mr. Shattuck dis- 
posed of his steam dredger to Captain William 
Willard for ten thousand dollars. Although 
past seventy-five years of age, Mr. Shattuck 
is hale and hearty, with the physical and 
mental vigor of a man a score of years 
younger. A keen-sighted, clear-headed man 
of business, he has been unusually successful 
in worldly matters, notwithstanding his various 
losses, being now in affluent circumstances. 
Mr. Shattuck was united in marriage March 



27, 1863, with Martha Lord, daughter of 
Stephen Lord, of Windham. The only child 
of this union is a son, William P. Shattuck, 
of Mobile, Ala. 



/©To 



V 3 1 in mercantile business at Cash's 
^ — *~ Corner, South Portland, Me., for 
more than a quarter of a century. He was 
born in the town of Cape Elizabeth,- of which 
South Portland was formerly a part, on March 
31, 1 841. His father, Stephen Cash, was a 
grandson of Nathaniel Cash, who was a life- 
long resident of Cape Elizabeth. Nathaniel 
Cash was a large landholder, and engaged in 
tilling the soil during his working years, liv- 
ing to the ripe old age of fourscore. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Lucy Strout, 
bore him six children, all being reared in this 
locality. 

Stephen Cash grew to manhood in the place 
of his nativity, and was early engaged in agri- 
cultural labors. Enlisting in the army, he 
served through the Mexican War, and on his 
return home settled on a farm in this town, 
which was afterward his permanent abiding- 
place. Of the children born to him and his 
wife, Elizabeth Palmer, who was a daughter of 
John Palmer, of Cape Elizabeth, the following 
are now living: William Cash, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Styles, George W., and Mrs. Lucy Pike. 

George W. Cash acquired his education in 
his native town, and on leaving school learned 
the cooper's trade of N. Hasty in Portland, 
continuing in that occupation for three years. 
The succeeding seven years Mr. Cash was em- 
ployed in the Portland glass factory, which he 
then left, in order that he might establish him- 
self in business. Coming to Cash's Corner 
in 1869, he opened a grocery store on his 
present location, and since that time has been 
actively identified with the welfare of the 
place. It is largely owing to the energetic 
enterprise and practical sagacity of Mr. Cash 
that this thriving village has attained its pres- 
ent prosperous condition, he having erected 
many of the buildings and in every way as- 
sisted in the growth and advancement of the 
place. 

Mr. Cash was united in marriage November 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 59 



6, 1864, with Miss Olive A., daughter of 
Anice Littlefield, of Kennebunk, this State. 
Eleven children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Cash, and the seven here named are now 
living: Alice W., born June 1, 1866, is the 
wife of Charles Hayden, of Massachusetts, 
and has three children — Orville, Sadie, and 
Tena Belle; Henry E., now in business with 
his father, was the first Postmaster of the 
office at Cash's Corner, having served from 
1891 until the present year, and he was born 
August 24, 1867, and was married Eebruary 

7, 1893, to Rosamond Rogers, of Knights- 
ville; Herbert E. was born January 28, 1869; 
Nellie M., born February 22, 1873, married 
Clarence Newland ; Georgie B. was born 
July 11, 1882; Carrie May was born Novem- 
ber 6, 1885; and Harold E. was born January 

8, 1888. All are at home with their parents. 
Mr. Cash is a vigorous supporter of the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party. Socially, he 
is prominent in the Order of Odd Fellows, 
being a member of Lagonia Lodge, No. 5, and 
of the Eastern Star Encampment, No. 2. Re- 
ligiously, he is a consistent member of the 
Methodist church, while his wife, who holds 
liberal views on the subject of Christianity, 
is a regular attendant of the Unitarian church. 



7"T\0L0NEL GEORGE F. McOUILLAN, 
I v-^ attorney and counsel lor-at-law, 98 Ex- 

\A>^ change Street, Portland, Me., was 
born in Naples, Me., April 18, 
1849, son of the Rev. Hugh and Elvira 
(Wight) McQuillan, both natives of Maine. 
He is a descendant of the McQuillans who en- 
tered Ireland with the earliest English adven- 
turers, and were the ancient lords of the 
northern coast and the surrounding district, 
from Dunseverick Castle, in County Antrim, 
near the Giant's Causeway, to Dunluce Castle. 
Dunseverick, which tradition says was built by 
the McQuillans, is now a heap of ruins; and 
Dunluce, though dismantled and crumbling 
with age, is still recognizable as a once strong 
and beautiful fortress. The McQuillans were 
lords of this part of Ireland as late as the reign 
of ( Jueen Elizabeth. Their downfall dates from 
the marriage of the daughter of McQuillan, 
Lord of Dunluce, with MacDonnell, a chief- 



tain from the opposite Scottish Highlands. 
MacDonnell subsequently took possession of 
the Antrim territory, and got King James I. 
to confirm him as the owner, since which the 
MacDonnells have been Earls of Antrim. The 
McQuillans, deprived of their possessions, 
became scattered through the northern part of 
the country, and thence to other parts of the 
world. John McQuillan, grandfather of 
Colonel McQuillan, was born in the north of 
Ireland. A man of fine form and good phy- 
sique, he entered the English navy, and in 
time became a subordinate officer. He left 
the service of the English government at 
Portland, Me., and afterward settled in Gor- 
ham, marrying Olive Edwards, a native of that 
town, who was his second wife. John Mc- 
Quillan died in Gorham in 1807, and his wife 
died there in 1820. 

The Rev. Hugh McQuillan, the second son 
of John and Olive (Edwards) McQuillan, was 
born in Gorham, Me., July 18, 1S03. After 
the death of his father he lived with and was 
educated by a gentleman in Windham, Me., 
until he was twenty-one years of age. He was 
ordained a minister in the denomination of 
Christian Baptists, and was engaged in evan- 
gelical work up to the time of his death, 
which occurred in Casco, Me., April 14, 
1861. He was married in Naples, Me., in 
1842 to Elvira Wight, who was born in Otis- 
field, Me., April 16, 1807, and was a member 
of an old family who settled in Dedham, Nor- 
folk County, Mass., as early as 1636. Mrs. 
McQuillan was a noble woman, and after her 
husband's death kept her little family to- 
gether, and gave them the best educational ad- 
vantages within her means. She died in Yar- 
mouth, Me., November 27, 1881. Hugh and 
Elvira (Wight) McQuillan had three children 
— Rufus H., Liza A., and George F. Rufus 
H. was born in Naples Me., November 18, 
1844. When a youth of seventeen he enlisted 
as a private, joining Company G, First Regi- 
ment, United States Infantry, May 24, 1862, 
and shared in the second battle of Bull Run, 
Antietam, South Mountain, the first battle of 
Fredericksburg, and the siege of Vicksburg, 
from May 19 to July 4, 1863. During the 
last year he served as Orderly to the general 
commanding at New Orleans. Lie was dis- 



2f)0 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



charged at New Orleans, May 24, 1865. On 
leaving the army he engaged in the lumber 
business, having charge at different times of 
various lumber-mills in the West. He went 
to Yarmouth, Me., to reside in 18S0, where 
he engaged in the lumber business and opened 
up a large hardware store. In politics he was 
a Republican, and was Deputy Sheriff at Yar- 
mouth under Sheriff Benjamin True for two 
years. lie always took great interest in 
Grand Army affairs, and was the first Com- 
mander of the Post at Yarmouth. He was a 
business man of the strictest integrity, and 
was one of the best-known and most highly 
respected citizens of Yarmouth. March 17, 
1874, he married Alma B. Sawyer in Ray- 
mond, Me. He died April 2$, 1896, at Yar- 
mouth, after a ten days' illness of pneumonia, 
leaving her and three children — Hugh D., 
< leorge H., and Rufus Leroy. Liza A. 
McQuillan was born in Naples, Me. She 
resides in Portland, and is unmarried. 

Colonel George F. McQuillan passed his 
boyhood days in the town of Raymond. He 
attended the common schools, and fitted for 
college at North Bridgton Academy. He 
graduated from Bowdoin in the class of 1875, 
his expenses having been partly paid by his 
mother and partly covered by what he earned 
by teaching school. His college course was 
marked by good fellowship. Everybody liked 
"Mac," as he was familiarly called. He took 
quite an interest in boating, being one year a 
member of the University crew. After grad- 
uating from college he taught in high schools 
in the northern part of Cumberland County for 
two years. lie then took up the study of law 
with the Hon. Bion Bradbury, of Portland. 
lie was admitted to the bar October 14, 1879, 
ami practised one year at Casco. He moved 
tti Portland in October, 1880, where he has 
since been in active practice. Besides being 
a member of the bar of the State court and the 
United States Circuit Court, Colonel Mc- 
Quillan was admitted to the Supreme Court of 
the United States in 1892 at Washington, 
D.C. He has been for a number of years at- 
torney lor several towns in Cumberland 
County, and is well known as an aide, com 
1 ientious, and reliable lawyer. In politics a 
Democrat, he was appointed June 6, 1S81, 



Judge Advocate-general on the staff of Gov- 
ernor l'laisted, with the rank of Colonel, and 
served in that capacity till January 3, 1883. 
He has been the Democratic candidate for 
Clerk of Courts of Cumberland County, ami 
ran well on the ticket, getting his party's full 
support. In 1892 he was the Democratic can- 
didate for Judge of the Probate Court for Cum- 
berland County. On December 1, 1892, the 
law firm of Bradbury & McQuillan was formed, 
consisting of Colonel Albert \V. Bradbury 
and the subject of this sketch, and was contin- 
ued till May 28, 1894, when Colonel Bradbury 
was appointed United States District At- 
torney. Since that time Colonel McQuillan 
has been without an associate in his legal 
work. 

In 1 891 he was united in marriage with 
Miss Mary F. Robie, daughter of ex-Governor 
Frederick Robie and his wife, Mary Olivia 
(Priest) Robie. Colonel and Mrs. McQuillan 
have one child, Harriet R., who was born 
March 14, 1894. Colonel McQuillan is a man 
of scholarly attainments, whose judgment in 
educational matters was recognized even be- 
fore he entered on his legal career. While at 
college he was appointed Supervisor of Schools 
at Raymond. He also served as Supervisor of 
Schools at Casco, and as Town Clerk in 1879- 
80. He has a substantial residence on Carle- 
ton Street, Portland. 



(*)|| RIS' 



RISTRAM G. CLEAVES, who enjoys 
*il the distinction of being the oldest na- 
-^ tive male resilient of Yarmouth, Me., 
was born in this town June 13, 1809. His 
parents were Edmund and Jane (Trow) 
Cleaves, his father's ancestors being related 
to those of Governor Cleaves. His great- 
grandfather, Ebenezer Cleaves, who settled 
in Cumberland County many years ago, was a 
native of Gloucester, Mass. Edmund Cleaves, 
first, son of Ebenezer, was one of the early 
settlers of the town of Pownal in this county, 
where he cleared and improved a good farm, 
lie served under General Washington all 
through the Revolutionary War, and, after the 
termination of hostilities, retired to his home- 
stead, and there passed the rest of his life, 
dying at the age of seventy-seven years. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



26 ( 



was an industrious, high-minded, and patriotic 
citizen. In his religion he was a Congrega- 
tionalism and his name appears as one of the 

six original members of the Congregational 
church in Pownal. He was twice married, his 
five children being as follows: Abigail and 
Edmund, who were by his first union; and 
Eunice, Dolly, and William, who were by his 
second. 

Edmund Cleaves, second, son of the first 
Edmund, was born in New Gloucester, Ale. 
When a ymmg man he learned the trade of a 
shoemaker, and, settling in Yarmouth, fol- 
lowed that occupation in connection with 
farming. His farm was situated where the 
Grand Trunk Depot now stands, and he re- 
sided there until his death, which took place 
when he was seventy-two years old. He was 
a prominent and useful member of the com- 
munity, supporting the Whig party in politics; 
and he ably filled some of the town offices. 
He was a Congregationalist in religion. His 
wile, Jane Trow, who was a native of Yar- 
mouth, became the mother of twelve children, 
nine of whom grew to maturity; and of these 
Tristram G., the subject of this sketch, is now 
the only survivor. Mrs. Jane T. Cleaves 
lived to reach the age of nearly eighty years. 

Tristram G. Cleaves commenced his educa- 
tional course in the common schools of Yar- 
mouth, and completed it at the academy. In 
early manhood he settled upon the farm where 
he now resides, and, like his father, engaged 
for many years in both shoemaking and farm- 
ing, judiciously alternating these pursuits 
with satisfactory results, as was the frequent 
practice of New England landholders in the 
early and middle part of the present century. 
In the pleasant, comfortable home which he 
has occupied for the past fifty-five years, he 
now lives in retirement from active labors, 
his rest having been well earned. 

On January 3, 1832, Mr. Cleaves was 
united in marriage with Mrs. Mary Davis, 
who was born in Freeport in September, 1802. 
She was a daughter of Samuel and Patience 
Davis, and widow of Thomas Davis, by whom 
she had one daughter, Mary E., who became 
Mrs. Gad Hitchcock. Mr. and Mrs. Cleaves 
had four children, as follows: Jane Trow, who 
died at the age of fifty-eight; Abigail Davis, 



who died, aged nine years; Rachel B., who 
died, aged three years; and Thomas G., who 
died- at the age of forty-two years. Mrs. 
Cleaves died March 28, 1874. She was a 
member of the Congregational church, with 
which Mr. Cleaves has been united for many 
years. He has been called upon to mourn the 
loss of both wife and children, the only sur- 
viving member of his family being his step- 
daughter, Mrs. Hitchcock; but he bears his 
affliction with patient resignation. He is a 
Republican in politics. 




APTAIN JOHN M. RICHARDSON, 

superintendent of the life-saving 
stations of the First District, which 
comprises Maine and New Hamp- 
shire, with his headquarters at Portland, Me., 
was born at Pittsfield, N.H., September 20, 
1835, where his father, the Rev. John Rich- 
ardson, was settled as pastor of the Baptist 
church, remaining there until 1842. The 
Rev. Mr. Richardson's next charge was at 
South Berwick in this State, which was his 
home for many years, although at the time of 
his decease he was living at Auburn, Me. 
He married Mary J. Perkins, who bore him 
five children, namely: Mary J., wife of H. C. 
Gilpatrick, of Somersworth, N.H.; Mrs. S. 1'. 
Ordway, a widow, residing at Somerville, 
Mass.; W. S. Richardson, of Newark, N.J. ; 
T. B. (deceased); and the Captain. 

John M. Richardson was educated at the 
common schools and academy at South Ber- 
wick, leaving the latter institution when a boy 
of fifteen to follow the sea. For the first thir- 
teen years of his seafaring life young Rich- 
ardson was employed in the East India trade, 
and for twelve years thereafter was connected 
with European trade. Shipping at first as a 
boy before the mast, he gradually worked his 
way upward through every grade until he be- 
came master of the vessel, a position which he 
ably filled for some years. For a quarter of a 
century he sailed the seas, visiting in that 
time all the important ports of the globe, but 
fortunately meeting with no disaster of any 
kind. In 1874, at the time of the organization 
of the life-saving service, Captain Richardson 
accepted his present position; and under his 



262 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



supervision all of the life-saving stations of 
this district, twelve in number, have been built 
and equipped. From year to year vast im- 
provements are made, and the efficiency of the 
service greatly increased. Ninety-six men are 
now employed, distributed at various points 
along the coasts of Maine and New Hamp- 
shire, each station being amply supplied with 
life-boats of the must improved modern con- 
struction, many of the life-saving appliances 
of each boat having been devised by Captain 
Richardson himself. With the exception of 
S. I. Kimball, the chief of the department, 
Captain Richardson ranks as the oldest officer 
in point of time, and, it is hardly needful to 
say, is regarded as one of the must valuable in 
the service. 

For many years the Captain has resided at 
2 1 Locust Street, where he has a cosey home, 
in which he and his wife extend a cordial hos- 
pitality to their many friends. Socially, he 
is a Mason, belonging to St. John's Lodge, 
No. 51, A. F. & A. M., of South Berwick. 
The maiden name of the first wife of Captain 
Richardson was Miriam P. Hanson. She died 
in early life, leaving him two children, 
namely: Minnie L, now deceased; ami John 
W., who is in the employment of John C. 
Stevens, the noted architect of this city. 
Captain Richardson subsequently married 
Miss Emily S. Hunt, who was born and bred 
in Belfast, Me. 




'LWLLL ]•:. LIBBY, a prosperous 
farmer of Standish, Me., was born 
in Gorham, the date of his birth 
being December 22, 1832. He is 
of Revolutionary stock and the descendant of 
one of the early settlers of New England. 
John Libby, his ancestor several generations 
removed, was born, it is said, about the year 
1602. The "History of Scarboro," published 
in the "Collections of the Maine Historical 
Society," vol. iii., says that "John Libby, 
probably the first of the name in New 
England, came to this country from Broad- 
stairs, County Kent, England," and is sup- 
posed to have settled at Scarboro about 1659 
or 1660, was a Selectman in 1669, and died in 
1682. It is elsewhere stated that he had two 



wives; but of these little is known, save that 
his first wife was the mother of all his suns 
excepting two and, probably, of all of his 
daughters. She bore him twelve children, 
Daniel, the progenitor of Sewell E., being the 
tenth child. 

The said Daniel Libby was born in 1657 in 
Scarboro, this county, where he spent a 
farmer's life. To him and his wile Eleanor 
nine children were born, John, second, the 
next in line of descent, being the fourth sun. 
John, second, was bum in 1697, at Portsmouth, 
N. 11., and on November 14, 1724, married 
Sarah Libby, who bore him seven children, 
Allison being the fourth sun., Allison Libby, 
the great-grandfather of Sewell, was burn 
September 12, 1733, and early learned the 
shoemaker's trade, although he made farming 
his chief occupation. He was twice married ; 
and by his first wife, Sarah Skill ings, had 
eleven children, Edward, the next ancestor, 
being the third son by this union; and by his 
second wife, Mary, widow of an Edward 
Libby, he had six children. 

Edward Libby, son of Allison and Sarah, 
was born February 10, 1759, in Scarboro. 
Although but a mere lad on the breaking out 
of the Revolution, the patriotic blood within 
him was stirred; and he enlisted in his 
country's defence, and took part in the battle 
of Bunker Hill, fought on that memorable 
17th of June, 1775. At the close of the 
war he bought a tract of wild land in Gor- 
ham, on which he cleared a space for the elec- 
tion of a log cabin, and when the latter was 
completed returned to Scarboro for his bride, 
Elizabeth Libby, who was his life companion. 
She settled with him in the wilderness, and 
assisted him in his efforts at establishing a 
homestead, on which they both spent their 
remaining days, he dying in [848, and she in 
1853. They reared eleven children, Ebenezer 
Howe Libby, father of Sewell E., being the 
youngest son and the tenth child. 

Ebenezer Howe Libby, a native of Gorham, 
Me., was born December 22, 1810. He was 
reared to farming pursuits, which he continued 
during his brief life, spending his later years 
in the town of Standish. He married Cather- 
ine R. Irish, daughter of Daniel Irish, of 
Gorham; and of their union one child, Sewell 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



263 



K. , was born. The mother is now living with 
her son, she having survived her husband, who 
died in early manhood. He was a Democrat 
in politics, and with his wife attended the 
Methodist church. 

Sewell E. Libby was reared and educated 
in Standish. Selecting farming as the most 
congenial occupation, he has since devoted his 
time and attention to agricultural labors, and 
has besides been somewhat extensively en- 
gaged in lumbering, meeting with signal suc- 
cess in his various enterprises. 

Mr. Libby was united in marriage June 23, 
1855, with Mary A. Sanborn, daughter of 
Moses Sanborn. Four children are the fruit 
of this union, three of whom are now living, 
as follows: Katie B. , born August 25, 1856, 
.is the wife of Charles J. Libby, and has three 
children — Harold Clifton, Herman S. , and 
Alice; Susie F., born October 16, 1863, is 
the wife of Willard T. Cram ; Clifford .S. was 
born July 24, 1875. Mr. Libby is a Demo- 
crat in politics, having proved true to the 
political principles in which he was reared. 
He attends and helps to support the Congre- 
gational church, of which Mrs. Libby is a 
faithful member. 




REDERIC LINCOLN TOWER is 
the President and General Manager of 
the Thurston Print at 971 /:• Exchange 
Street, Portland, Me., which is one of the 
largest printing establishments in the State, 
as well as one of the oldest, it having been in 
existence for more than a half a century. Mr. 
Tower was born August 23, i860, in Stough- 
ton, Mass., coming from ancient and honored 
Colonial stock. His title to membership in 
the Sons of the Revolution, an organization 
which he joined sometime ago, is an unusually 
strong one. Five of his ancestors fought in 
the struggle for American Independence, one 
of them, Benjamin Gill, his mother's great- 
great-grandfather, having been a Colonel in 
the army and in command of a regiment at the 
surrender of Burgoyne. Colonel Gill married 
Bethiah Wentworth, their son Elijah marrying 
Abigail Fisher, the line continuing through 
Elijah Gill, Jr., who married Rebecca Hawes, 
thence through their son Jason, whose wife, 



Mary Ann Talbot, bore him children, among 
them being Marietta Turner Gill, who married 
Francis W. D. Tower, father of Frederic Lin- 
coln. 

Frederic L. Tower attended the public 
schools of Stoughton in his early boyhood, 
afterward continuing his studies in the Boston 
grammar schools and at the Roxbury High 
School. His first employment was with the 
E. Howard Watch Company, being a time 
clerk in their factory for two years. Subse 
quently becoming a clerk in the wholesale 
grocery store of Matthias Rich & Co. on 
North Market Street, Boston, he remained 
with them two years, when he became ship- 
ping clerk for C. D. Cobb & Brothers, grocers 
of the same city. After working in this 
capacity for about one year, Mr. Tower's 
health became impaired to such an extent that 
a change to outdoor labor was necessitated. 
Accepting a situation with \V. A. Greenough 
& Co., in the directory business, he proved 
an able assistant, becoming so thoroughly 
acquainted with the work that when, three or 
four years later, Mr. Greenough bought a half- 
interest in the Portland Directory, forming a 
copartnership for its publication with IS. 
Thurston & Co., Mr. Tower, being the only 
man available who had any experience in the 
street directory business, was sent to Portland 
to take charge of compiling the work. Many 
of the valuable ideas in the street directory 
originated with Mr. Tower. The concern was 
incorporated on March 3, 1890, as the Brown 
Thurston Company, with B. Thurston as Presi- 
dent and George H. Watkins as Treasurer and 
Manager; but, Mr. Watkins dying very sud- 
denly on March 16, Mr. Tower was appointed 
General Manager in his place. This relation 
continued until January 21, 1S95, when the 
present corporation was formed, Mr. Tower 
becoming President and General Manager, 
with Mr. Isaac N. Halliday as Treasurer and 
superintendent. 

Besides publishing the directories for all 
the important cities and towns of Maine, this 
company has printed the directories for the 
larger cities of Massachusetts and New Hamp- 
shire, including those of Boston, Brookline, 
Brockton, Cambridge, Haverhill, Maiden, 
Melrose, Concord, Nashua, Portsmouth, and 



264 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



many others. They make a specialty of fine 
job printing, their publications including 
prominent State historical works; religious 
papers, pamphlets, tracts, and books of differ- 
ent denominations, Protestant and Catholic; 
biographical and genealogical volumes ; poems ; 
law hooks and school books. The Thurston 
Print publishes the works of the Maine His- 
torical Society, and is now at work on the 
York County Deeds, bringing out about a vol- 
ume a \ear. The firm has a wide reputation 
for accurate and artistic work, faithful efforts 
being made to bring it above the average. 
On December 6, 1883, Mr. Tower was 
united in marriage with Miss Julia M. 
Crocker, daughter of Edmund and Julia M. 
((takes) Crocker, of Dorchester, Mass. They 
are the parents of one child, Frances Lilian. 
In his political relations Mr. Tower is an 
adherent of the Republican party. Socially, 
he is Past Chancellor of Bramhall Lodge and 
a representative to the Grand Lodge, Knights 
of Pythias, being a prominent member of the 
organization. Religiously, both Mr. and Mrs. 
Tower are attendants at All Souls' Univer- 
sal ist Church of Deering, where they reside, 
he being a member of the Parish Committee. 




EUEL WILLIAM WOODMAN, an 
enterprising business man of West- 
brook, Me., the originator of the 
Fairfield, the Maine, and the New 
England Furniture Companies, was born in 
Fairfield, Me., July 25, 1S37, a son of John 
and Nancy L. (Deering) Woodman. II is 
paternal grandfather, John Woodman, Sr. , 
who was a native of Buxton, this State, was 
a pioneer lumberman on the Saco River in 
his early manhood, but in his later life was 
engaged in the less hazardous occupation of 
fanning. He attained the age of eighty-three 
years; and he and his wife reared seven chil- 
dren, all of whom have long since passed away. 
John Woodman, Jr., the father of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was born in Buxton, Me. 
IK- became a resident of Fairfield in the early 
days of that town, ami was for some years 
engaged in lumbering and farming. The last 
years of his life were devoted exclusively to 
farming. In politics he was a Democrat, and 



in religious belief a Universalist. He died 
October 18, 1S72, at the age of seventy-two. 
His wife, who was a native of Gorham, Me., 
died at the age of eighty-two years. Five 
children were born to them, three of whom 
are still living, namely: Johanna, widow of 
Samuel Gibson, of Fairfield, Me. ; Reuel W. , 
the subject of this sketch; and Frederick S., 
who now has charge of the old home farm. 

Reuel W. Woodman obtained his education 
in the public schools of Fairfield. He 
worked on the old Woodman farm in Fairfield 
until attaining his majority, and subsequently 
entering the employ of Gage & Gate, manu- 
facturers of boxes, doors, sashes, and blinds, 
devoted his energies to learning the trade of 
a wood-worker. Within three years one of the 
firm died; and in September, 1S63, Mr. 
Woodman hired the sash and door department 
anil started in business for himself with a 
working force of nine men, under the style of 
R. W. Woodman. He conducted this enter- 
prise for about a year; then, taking James W. 
Sylvester as partner, they bought the entire 
business, which they conducted for one year, 
when Mr. Sylvester sold his interest to C. D. 
and A. E. Lawrence, their style being 
changed to Woodman, Lawrence & Co., and 
the new firm employing about twenty men. 
This plant was subsequently sold to Bray 
Wilkins; and, in company with Warren Clark, 
Mr. Woodman started a steam-mill on his 
father's farm, near the Maine Central Rail- 
road. As business increased, another partner, 
John Hammond, was admitted; and the firm 
of Woodman, Clark & Co. added to its original 
work the manufacture of ash and walnut furni- 
ture. Soon a company bearing the name of 
the Fairfield Furniture Company was formed, 
consisting of Messrs. Woodman, Clark, Ride- 
out, and Mullen. In course of time Mr. 
Woodman bought out his original associates 
and sold equal parts of the business to Samuel 
Gibson, George H. Newhall, and Tyng W. 
Fogg. About a year after these gentlemen 
became interested in the enterprise the plant 
was destroyed by fire; and, as there was no 
insurance, the loss was severe. After the fire 
Mr. Newhall retired from the concern, and the 
other partners built a large planing-mill and 
engaged once more in the manufacture of fur- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



:6 5 



niture. John F. Kendrick soon became asso- 
ciated with them; and, Mr. Gibson disposing 
of his interest, the other members of the 
company conducted a good business for seven 
years. They then sold the planing-mill to 
the Kennebec Framing Company, but contin- 
ued tu manufacture furniture. In the spring 
of 18S0 Mr. Woodman sold out his share in 
the enterprise, and in company with W. A. 
and F. E. Sheppard and F. P. Wing, bought 
a water privilege at Bar Mills, Buxton, Me., 
and, erecting a large mill, began to manufact- 
ure furniture under the style of the Maine Fur- 
niture Company. They had a branch estab- 
lishment in Boston, to which they sent their 
products, which were there put together, fin- 
ished, and sold to the wholesale trade. Mr. 
Woodman was interested in the Buxton plant 
about six years. Then, selling to his partner, 
he moved to Portland, where he resided for 
about a year. At the end of that time, with 
T. E. Ross as a business associate, he pur- 
chased the Warren water-power saw-mill and 
box manufactory at Pork Hill, Saccarappa 
(now Westbrook), and, erecting a two-story 
building, one hundred and ninety-two by fifty 
feet in dimensions, engaged in lumbering and 
making furniture, under the style of the New 
England Furniture Company. His partner sold 
his share in 1888, and Messrs. Wing and Pratt 
were active members of- the company until 
February 4, 1893. Since that time Mr. 
Woodman has been sole proprietor of the 
plant. He employs on an average thirty- 
seven hands, and manufactures ash and oak 
furniture, making a specialty of extension 
tables of all kinds and grades, from pine to 
walnut. Being a practical workman himself, 
he takes a keen interest in his business, and 
has invented a number of ingenious machines, 
which he utilizes in his business. He has 
built, equipped, and successfully managed five 
different manufactories, and has long been an 
important factor in the industrial life of 
Maine. 

In 1863 Mr. Woodman was married to Hat- 
tie M., daughter of John and Lucy Ann Gib- 
son, of Clinton, Me. Three children have 
brightened the years of their wedded life, two 
of whom are living, namely: Bert M., who is 
in business with his father, but resides in 



Portland; and Helen G., wife of E. T. May- 
berry, Postmaster at Westbrook. Mr. W 1 

man votes the Democratic ticket. He is con- 
nected with the fraternal orders, being a mem- 
ber of Siloam Lodge, No. 92, A. F. & A. M., 
Drummond Chapter, No. 27, of Oakland, Me., 
and St. Omer Commandery, No. 12, of Water- 
ville, Me, He has also passed the chairs of 
Fairfield Lodge, No. 6S, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, of Fairfield. In religious 
belief he is a Spiritualist. 




YLVANUS C. PRINCE, the leading 
merchant of Orr's Island, Harps 
well, Me., was born in Brunswick, 
Me., March 7, 1832, son of Pyan 
and Lois (Furbish) Prince. His father, who 
was a native of North Yarmouth, Me., was for 
many years mate of a vessel trading with the 
West Indies; but, wearying at length of the 
restless and uncertain life of a sailor, he pur- 
chased a farm in Brunswick, at Simenses 
Point, and there spent the rest of his life in 
the enjoyment of domestic comfort, dying at 
the age of seventy-two. His wife was a native 
of Lisbon, Me. She lived to be sixty-two 
years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Pyan Prince were 
members of the Calvinist Baptist Church. 
They were the parents of eleven children, and 
were called upon to suffer many of the trials 
incident to the rearing of a large family, three 
of their children lying dead in their home at 
one time, stricken down by diphtheria. The 
following five are now living: Sylvanus C. , 
of Orr's Island; Solomon P. C, a farmer in 
Webster, Me.; Beulah S. , wife of Samuel E. 
Smullen; Henry K., a professional nurse in 
Lowell, Mass.; and Orrin G., a farmer in 
Brunswick, Me. 

Sylvanus C. Prince remained on the home 
farm till sixteen years of age, and then, turn- 
ing to the sea as a means of gaining a liveli 
hood, began to take part in the fishing indus 
try, in course of time becoming Captain of a 
vessel. In 1S53, when he was twenty-one 
years of age, he began his career as a merchant 
at Prince's Point; and in 1877 he built the 
store which he now occupies, the largest on 
the island. He keeps a full line of groceries, 
dry goods, and fishermen's supplies, and also 



2 66 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKVV 



wood and coal. Having been in business now 
over forty years, he is one of the oldest as 
well as one of the most successful merchants 
in the vicinity; and his universal courtesy and 
genial disposition have won hosts of friends, 
lie has travelled a great deal, and has a fund 
ul information and of anecdote that makes him 
a very pleasant companion. 

In i .S 54 he was united in marriage with Fi- 
delia T. Sinnett, daughter of George Sinnett, 
who was at that time a fisherman of Harpswell, 
hut has since died, completing a useful life of 
seventy-three years. Seven children were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Prince, two of whom, Mar- 
cellus and John S., have passed from earth, 
the former at the age of thirty-six, the latter 
at the age of twenty-five. Marcellus Prince 
was a merchant of Portland, dealing princi- 
pally in fish. He married Ada Buxton, of 
Dexter, Me., who, with two children, Ger- 
trude and Marcia, is still living. John S. 
Prince, who was his father's partner, died 
December 22, 1893, leaving a widow. This 
lady's maiden name was Cora Y. York; and 
she was born in Wilton, Me. The other 
children, briefly named, are as follows: Al- 
bertina Prince is the wife of Eugene Pennell, 
an expressman of Brunswick, and the mother 
of three children — ■ Annetta, Sylvanus, and 
Ada; Content J. is the wife of Charles E. 
Hacker, the contractor and builder of Bruns- 
wick, who erected the large cotton-mills there, 
and has one child, Beatrice; Georgie is the 
wife of Fred Fides, master of a fishing-vessel, 
and has two children — Mildred and Avery; 
Sanford J. Prince, in business with his father, 
married Hattie E. Stilphcn, of Harpswell, and 
has five children — Eva M., Rosetta, Beulah, 
Ivan, and Sadie; and Mary Jane Prince, a 
young lady who has established a reputation 
for scholarship and intellectual brilliancy, is 
a cashier in Boston, but has not yet severed 
the home ties. 

Mr. Prince cast his first Presidential vote 
for James Buchanan, but has since been a 
stanch supporter of Republican principles, 
refusing, however, all offers of public prefer- 
ment. He belongs to Pejapscot Lodge, No. 
13, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Brunswick, and to the Island Home Lodge of 
the Golden Cross, Orr's Island, of which he 



was a charter member and has been chaplain. 
In religious belief a Methodist, he is Steward 
and Trustee of the Methodist Episcopal 
church on Orr's Island, has filled other offices, 
and in the Sunday-school is class teacher and 
superintendent of the school. His wife also 
is a teacher in the Sunday-school, and his 
children take an active part in the affairs oi 
the church. 



Yf3)TON. CHARLES JARVIS CHAP- 
L^-l MAN, merchant, banker, and ex- 
\[g I Mayor of Portland, was born in 

— ' Bethel, among the hills of Oxford 
County, Me., January 29, 1848. He is the 
son of Robert A. and Frances (Carter) Chap- 
man, the former a native of Gilead, Me., the 
latter of Massachusetts. He attended the 
public schools and Gould's Academy in his 
native town, then took a course at Gorham 
Academy, and, entering Bowdoin College in 
1864, was graduated in the class of 1868, with 
the degree of A. B. He was an enthusiastic 
student, and in his Senior year won the first 
prize for excellence in English composition; 
but he applied himself so closely to his books 
during his college course that his health be- 
came impaired, and after his graduation he 
took a trip to Minnesota. He was there em- 
ployed by the Northern Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany, which was then in its earlier period of 
construction in that State, and remained two 
years, making the acquaintance of many promi- 
nent railroad men. 

In 1870, his health being improved, he 
returned to Maine and entered actively upon 
the business career which eventually proved so 
brilliant, becoming a member of the flour and 
grain commission house of Norton, Chapman 
& Co., in Portland. There have been several 
changes in this firm during the past quarter 
of a century; but Mr. Chapman has remained 
through them all and is now the principal 
owner in the company, which he recently had 
incorporated under the name it had borne so 
long, and is Treasurer and Manager, having 
disposed of enough shares of stock to equip it 
with the necessary officers. It is recognized 
as the leading house in Maine in the flour and 
grain trade, and represents some of the largest 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



267 



and best-known mills of the West whose 
products stand' high in public favor, including 
the celebrated Pillsbury Washburn Mills of 
Minneapolis. 

An able financier, Mr. Chapman has de- 
voted a portion of his time to banking, estab- 
lishing in icSgo, in connection with his 
brothers, Cullen C. and Robert Chapman, the 
well-known and successful banking company 
whose establishment was located on Middle 
Street, Portland. The business increased so 
rapidly that it was decided to incorporate it as 
a national bank ; and, accordingly, the Chap- 
man National Hank opened its doors for busi- 
ness October 9, 1893, and has been very suc- 
cessful in its operations. 

Mr. Chapman has also done a great deal for 
the financial betterment of the city of Port- 
land. A Republican in politics, he served on 
the Common Council from 1877 to 1879, being 
President of that body the last term ; and at 
the time the Portland & Rochester Road was 
sold, by preventing undue haste he brought 
to the city treasurer seventy-five thousand 
dollars more than it would otherwise have 
realized. From 1880 to 1881 he was on 
the Board of Aldermen, serving as Chairman 
the second year. In 1886 he was elected 
Mayor of the city, and was subsequently re- 
elected by increasing majorities, serving three 
years. The Pack Pay improvements date 
from that time, and also the lease of the 
Portland & Ogdensburg Railroad, in which 
the city had large interests, to the Maine 
Central, which has resulted in not only mak- 
ing the investment of the city remunerative, 
but also in securing permanently to Portland 
the commercial advantages for which the Port- 
land & Ogdensburg was constructed. Dur- 
ing his Mayoralty the new reservoir on Mun- 
joy Hill was built; the new public library 
building, the munificent gift of the Hon. 
J. 1'. Baxter, was accepted by the city, Mayor 
Chapman making a graceful and appropriate 
speech ; and the Longfellow statue on State 
Street Square was presented to the city by 
the Longfellow Association, which erected it 
in commemoration of the gifted poet. The 
great celebration of Portland's centennial was 
inaugurated and carried to a successful con- 
summation largely through Mayor Chapman's 



influence and untiring efforts; and he was one 
of the commissioners from the State on the 
occasion of the National Centennial in New 
York City in 1888. That same year he was 
an alternate delegate at large to the Republi- 
can National Convention at Chicago, which 
nominated President Harrison. 

During the past two or three years he has 
declined public office, and has occupied his 
time chiefly with commercial and banking 
interests, acting also as trustee for different 
estates, besides being employed on commit 
tees for the reorganization of different corpo 
rations. The universal confidence in his 
ability and integrity is shown by the names 
and standing of some of the companies whose 
affairs he has been called upon to adjust. 
Many of the matters intrusted to him have re- 
quired much time and good judgment. In 
addition to other work, he has found time to 
act as director and manager in several business 
and manufacturing corporations. He served 
several years as Director of the Portland & 
Ogdensburg Railroad and as an officer of the 
Board of Trade, and is now President of 
the Diamond Island Association, President of 
the Portland Sprinkling Company, Director 
of the Portland Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, Director of the Maine Auxiliary Fire 
Alarm Company, Vice-President of Chapman 
National Bank, and is connected officially and 
otherwise with various other important corpora- 
tions. Mr. Chapman was a trustee of the public 
library and a member of the School Committee 
for years, but resigned from both offices as 
he felt his time inadequate to properly dis- 
charge such duties. Through his entire busi- 
ness course his career has been one of straight- 
forward honesty, and he has won the confidence 
of all with whom he has had dealings. 

Mr. Chapman belongs to several fraternal 
associations, being a member of the Portland 
Club, the Athletic Club, the Portland Medical 
Science Club, and other literary an'd political 
organizations. He has been identified with 
the Bowdoin Club and also with the Portland 
Athletic Clubs since they were organized. Ap- 
preciating the beauty and value of Casco Bay 
as a summer resort, in 1892 he erected a hand- 
some residence on the highest point of Dia- 
mond Island, and helped in the reconstruction 



-68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and maintenance of the new Ottawa Hotel, 
thus bringing the advantages of the bay within 
the knowledge and enjoyment of visitors. 

September 15, 1 S 7 5 , Mr. Chapman was 
united in marriage with Anna Dow Hinds, 
daughter of Benjamin F. Hinds, a gentleman 
now more than twenty-five years connected 
with the Portland custom-house. Five chil- 
dren have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Chap- 
man, namely : Marion Carter, a student at 
Smith College; Robert Franklin, a student 
at the Portland High School; Charles Jarvis, 
Jr., Philip Freeland, and Harrison Carter, 
promising boys, who are yet attending school. 
His family, with the exception of the youngest 
boy, are all professing members of the Willis- 
ton Congregational Church ; and Mr. Chapman 
has been moderator of the church since its or- 
ganization. He has a beautiful home at the 
corner of Spring and Neal Streets, where he 
has resided for ten years, and which, re- 
mndelled and beautified, possesses an added 
interest as having been the original residence 
in Portland of Governor Washburn. 



TT^APTAIN HORACE B. SOULE, a 
I \jS retired ship-master, residing in his 
^Hs pleasant home in South PTeeport, 

and a representative of one of the 
oldest families of Cumberland County, was 
born in this town on February 21, 1830, son 
of Enos and Sarah (Pratt) Soule. 

His great-grandfather, Barnabas Soule, was 
among the early pioneers of Freeport, where 
he engaged in farming. Barnabas Soule, Jr., 
son of the elder Barnabas, was born in 1758. 
Like his father, he devoted his attention to 
agriculture; and, being a man of perseverance 
and energy, he acquired a goodly amount of 
real estate, and was a leading citizen of the 
town. He died on January 25, 1823. His 
wife, Jane Dennison, who was born in Free- 
port in 1760, lived until March 5, 1S25. 
Their thirteen children all grew to adult life, 
but none are now living. They were: David 
(first), David (second), Esther, Thomas, Jane, 
Eliphas, Enos, Joanna, Alfred, Henchman S., 
Jane B., William, and Clementh H. 

Enos Soule, the fifth son and seventh child, 
was born in South Freeport, on November 29, 



1792. He became a sailor at an early age, 
and, having mastered the art of navigation, 
was for many years one of the leading sea 
captains of his time. Later in life he took 
up ship building in company with two of liis 
brothers, and they conducted a large and suc- 
cessful business in that line at South Free- 
port. He died here on November 8, 1869. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Sarah Pratt, 
was born in Freeport on June 30, 1798. They 
reared twelve children, of whom two sons and 
three daughters are still living. The record 
is as follows: Francis B., Enos C, Martha J., 
Laura A., and Lydia L., all now deceased; 
Horace B. ; Barnabas (deceased); Emily S., 
born October 2, 1834, residing in South Free- 
port; Ellen T. (deceased); Margaret P.. born 
May 23, 1839, living in Portland, Mr.: 
Julius, a captain residing in Freeport, born 
on February 11, 1842; and Henrietta C, born 
April 25, 1844, living in South Freeport. 
Their mother died on December 30, 1881. 
She was a communicant of the Congregational 
church. The father was liberal in his relig- 
ious views and a Democrat in political affilia- 
tion. 

Horace B. Soule received his early edu- 
cation in the common schools of South Free- 
port, and later took a supplementary course of 
study at Lewiston Academy. Pie made his 
first voyage when seventeen years of age, as a 
seaman before the mast in the brig "Venus," 
which was commanded by Captain Francis 
Soule. About five years later, in 1S53, he- 
was given the command of the "Milwaukee," a 
ship capable of carrying seven hundred and 
fifty tons. From that time on, during the 
succeeding thirty years, he was in command 
of various vessels, some of the largest being 
the "Enos Soule," of fifteen hundred and 
twenty tons; the "Tarn O'Shanter," capable 
of carrying fifteen hundred and forty tons' 
burden; and the "Paramita," having a capac- 
ity of fifteen hundred and forty-seven tons. 
These were all built in the South Freeport 
ship-yards, and Captain Soule was part owner 
in them. His career as a Captain was one of 
remarkable success, as during the entire thirty 
years no accident of serious consequence oc- 
curred. In his voyages he visited many of the 
principal seaports of the world. Since he re- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



269 



tired, in 1SS2, he has made his home at South 
Freeport. 

On July 15, 1857, Captain Soule was 
united in marriage with Miss Emeline F. Tal- 
bert, who was born in Freeport, and was a 
daughter of Enoch Talbert. Three sons and 
one daughter were the fruit of their union, as 
follows: Everett H., born July 27, 1861, a 
sea captain; Maud H., born March 10, 1864, 
who married Charles Woodman, of Yarmouth, 
Me.; Paul H., born June 25, 1875, who is a- 
clerk in Boston, Mass.; Thatcher H., born 
June 30, 1877, now a student in Bowdoin Col- 
lege. Their mother died on November 4, 
[888. On January 25, 1894, Captain Soule 
married Miss Anna F. Dolley, who was born 
in Aroostook County, Maine. They have one 
son, Roderick F. , born March 3, 1895. In 
political affiliation, Captain Soule is a Demo- 
crat. His wife is a member of the Congrega- 
tional church of South Freeport. 




/ILLIAM HENRY CLIFFORD, 

counsel lor-at-law, was born in New- 
field, York County, Me., the town 
in which his father, Nathan Clifford, began 
his professional life. Nathan Clifford was 
born in Rumney, N.H., and established his 
residence in Newfield in 1820. He there 
married Hannah Aycr, daughter of Captain 
James Ayer, a prominent citizen and merchant 
in that part of the State. Henry Ayer came 
from the north of England and settled in 
Haverhill, Mass. Elisha, one of his descend- 
ants, removed to Saco, Me., and thence to 
Newfield, of which town he was one of the 
early settlers. James Ayer was the son of 
Elisha. Nathan Clifford removed to Portland, 
Me., in 1849; but all his children were na- 
tive in the town of Newfield. The ancestor 
of the Cliffords of New England was George, 
who came from Arnold, Nottingham County, 
England, in 1664, and landed in Boston, 
where for a time he resided. He finally set- 
tled in Hampton, N.H. He was a lineal de- 
scendant from the ancient and still-existing 
Clifford family, conspicuous in English his- 
tory and distinguished actors in many of its 
great events for centuries past. In this coun- 
try the Cliffords spring from a New Hamp- 



shire parentage. The late governor, John 
Henry Clifford, and Judge Nathan Clifford 
were descended from the same ancestor a few 
generations back. A correct genealogy of the 
Cliffords of New England is to be found in 
Joseph Dow's "History of Hampton,"* [894, 
vol. 2, p. 638. 

William Henry Clifford, the third son of 
Nathan Clifford, was fitted for college at the 
Portland Academy and Professor Wood's 
school at Yarmouth, Me. He entered Dart- 
mouth College, from which he was graduated 
in 1858. He studied law in Portland, in the 
office of Shepley & Dana, and completed his 
course in the office of Benjamin R. Curtis at 
Boston. Upon admission to the bar he opened 
a law office in Portland, where he has practised 
his profession ever since. For eight or ten 
years he was Commissioner of the United 
States Circuit Court for the District of Maine: 
and a very large proportion of the commit- 
ments for violation of the Federal Statutes 
were, for a series of years, made in his court. 
Later he acquired an extensive practice in 
the Federal courts of this and neighboring- 
circuits and in the Supreme Court at Wish 
ington. He is the author of Clifford's Re- 
ports, a compilation of Justice Clifford's de- 
cisions on the New England Circuit (four 
volumes). Mr. Clifford has from an early 
period in his life taken an active part in the 
political contests in Maine on the Democratic 
side, and has shared in the fortunes of his 
party in this State. He has achieved a high 
position as a Democratic leader, the result of 
having participated in the labor of every polit 
ical campaign in Maine since the close of the 
Civil War and of other services to his party 
outside of the State. He has been twice 
nominated as Democratic candidate for Con- 
gress in the First District of Maine, once 
against John II. Burleigh and the second time 
as the opponent of Thomas B. Reed, and won 
credit and respect both by his abilities and 
power as a political speaker and by the vigor 
and energy of his campaigns. Mr. Clifford 
has served on the National Democratic Com- 
mittee as the Maine member, has been called 
upon to preside at the State conventions of his 
party, on which occasions his opening speeches 
have been printed by the State Committee for 



2 7 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



circulation as campaign documents. He is 
the author of numerous speeches and addresses 
ol a literary and other character. Mr. Clif- 
ford still continues the practice of his profes- 
sion as the senior member of Clifford, Verrill 
& Clifford, the two junior partners being Mr. 
Elgin C. Verrill and Nathan Clifford, Mr. 
Clifford's oldest son. 

Mr. Clifford was bred in the school of De- 
mocracy, and stills holds the faith, as to strict 
Constitutional construction, tariff, and sound 
money, of that great party that once swayed 
the destinies of our country and has left its 
impress for all time upon its institutions and 
policy. 

In [866 Mr. Clifford married Ellen G., 
daughter of the lion. J. B. Brown, of Port- 
land; and their children are three sons and a 
daughter. 




ARNAS SEARS SHAILER, a suc- 
cessful tiller of the soil and the 
owner ol the old Cushman farm in 
New Gloucester, Me., of which place 
he is a highly respected citizen, was born in 
Brookline, Mass., on May i, 1839, son of the 
Rev. William II. and Betsey Payne (Ilascall) 
Shailer. Probably the earliest ancestor of 
this family in America was Thomas Shaler or 
Shaylor, the name being variously spelled, 
who, with about twenty-seven others, settled in 
1662 in the southern part of the Connecticut 
valley, at a place which a few years later 
received the name ol Haddam. 

William 11. Shailer was born in Haddam, 
Conn., in 1X07. He studied for the ministry, 
and was a graduate of the Theological Semi- 
nary and College at Hamilton, N.Y., later 
incorporated as the Madison University, in the 
class of 1 S 3 5 . His first pastoral charge was 
the Baptist church in Brookline, Mass., to 
which he went in 1837, and where he remained 
until March [9, 1 N 5 4 , when he removed to 
Portland, Ale., and was installed as the pastor 
of the First P.aptist Church of that city, a 
position which he continued to hold for a 
quarter of a century. Besides his church 
work, he was prominently interested in the 
genera] welfare and advancement of the com- 
munity, and for twenty-seven years was a 



member of the School Committee. He died 
there on February 23, 188 1, at the age of 
seventy-three years, three months, and three- 
days. On May 22, 1836, he was united in 
marriage with Miss Betsey Payne Ilascall, 
daughter of Professor Daniel Hascall, the 
founder of the Hamilton Literal}- and Theo- 
logical Seminary, which has since become the 
Madison University. Four children were the 
fruit of their union, namely' : Sophia, the wife 
of J. B. Mathews, of Newton Centre, Mass., 
agent for the Monson (Me.) Slate Company; 
Barnas S. ; Elizabeth H., who married the 
Rev. Safford D. Moxley, and lives in Bristol, 
R.I.; and Mary E., who died when ten yeai 
old. Their mother died in December, 1886, 
having survived their father five years. 

Barnas S. Shailer accpiired his early educa- 
tion in the common and high schools of Port- 
land. When eighteen years old he secured a 
position as clerk in a grocery store in Port- 
land, and remained there until four years 
later, at which time he went to Monson, Me., 
where he spent the succeeding seven years at 
work on a farm. He next returned to Port- 
land, and was employed as a clerk in his 
brother-in-law's grocery store for ten years. 

In 1878 he came to New Gloucester, and 
purchased the old Cushman farm, on which he- 
has since resided. This estate contains one 
hundred and twenty-five acres of land, and it 
is one of the oldest and most productive farms 
in the town. Mr. Shailer has made various 
improvements 11)1011 it since he owned it, and 
its appearance marks him as a thoroughly ca- 
llable and progressive agriculturist. He takes 
special pride in his horses, of which he has 
several of line breed. On December 25, 1S61, 
he was joined in marriage with Miss Harriet 
II. Sawyer, of Madison, Me., who was born 
on March 7, 1842, and is a daughter of Jeffer- 
son and Lydia (Crosby) Sawyer. Both her 
parents died in 1846, when she was but four 
years old; and she was reared by William 
Dutton, of Madison, Me. Her union with 
Mr. Shailer has been blessed by the birth ol 
six children, as follows: William II., who 
married Miss Blanche Carville, and lives in 
Lewiston, Me.; Hezekiah, who married Miss 
Margaret Sheridan, and is engaged in the shoe 
business in Freeport, Me. ; Mary, the wife of 




CHARLES E. HODGKINS 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



273 



Albert C. True, of Freeport, Me. ; Feroline 
I.., who died when but seventeen years of age; 
Bessie H., who with her husband, George 
W. Haskell, is living with her parents; and 
Harry, likewise residing at home. All the 
children have received a good public-school 
education. 

In political principles Mr. Shailer is a 
loyal adherent of the Republican party. Fra- 
ternally, he is a member of Siloarn Lodge, No. 
45, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Gray. 



7TAHARLES E. HODGKINS, whose por- 
I \y trait is herewith shown, has been con- 
^U^^. nected with the Portland Steamship 
Company since 1SS1, and is now 
chief engineer of the steamer "Portland." 
He was born in what is now Lowell, Me., De- 
cember 9, 1 83 1, son of Ebenezer and Mary 
(Webb) Hodgkins. 

Ebenezer Hodgkins was born in Temple, 
Me., in 1800. He was engaged in agricult- 
ural pursuits during the greater part of his 
life, and resided in different parts of Cumber- 
land County till a short time prior to his 
death, when he moved to Lcnoxville, Can- 
ada. There he died. May 17, 1875. His wife 
was a daughter of John and Sarah Webb, of 
Westbrook, and was born in 1801. John 
Webb was a farmer by occupation, one of the 
early settlers of Westbrook. Mrs. Mary W. 
Hodgkins died in 1837, at the age of thirty- 
six years and seven months. 

Charles E. was the eighth of ten children, 
and was but six years of age when he was left 
motherless. He received a common-school 
education, in the intervals between the school 
sessions working about the farm. In 1852 he 
went to Portland, and hired himself out as a 
deck hand for the summer, on the steamer 
"Admiral" on the St. John route; and in the 
fall of the same year he went to New York 
City, and took up what proved to be his life 
vocation, engaging first as a fireman on local 
steamships. He was fireman of the "Cale- 
donia" on her first trip from New York to 
Portland, a position of honor, as she was the 
first steamer to run between those cities ; and 
he was chief engineer of the "Carlotta" and 



the "Chase." which [died between Halifax 
and Portland, being on the former vessel 
when she took fire. In April, 18S1, he be- 
came connected with the Portland Steamship 
Company as chief engineer of the "Forest 
City," and has since taken charge of various 
boats for the company, including the well- 
known "John Brooks," the "Tremont," and 
the "Portland." Mr. Hodgkins is one of the 
oldest engineers on the line, and holds the 
full confidence of his employers. The heavy 
weight of responsibility which falls on tin- 
engineer of a great steamship, who has the 
lives of the passengers in his hands, has been 
ably borne by him for many years; and lie has 
never been found derelict in his duty. 

Mr. Hodgkins and Miss Laura A. Verrill, 
of Westbrook, were married on May 4, 1856. 
They have two children, a daughter and a son 
— Mary L. and Henry E. The former is the 
wife of William B. Bragdon, of Cumberland 
Mills,' Me. Henry E. Hodgkins is a ma- 
chinist of Westbrook, and has resided at Cum- 
berland Mills since 1872. He married Miss 
Olive Gustin, of South Gorham. 

In politics Mr. Hodgkins is a Republican. 
He is a member of Saccarappa Lodge, No. 1 1, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Cum- 
mings Encampment, No. 16; Naomi, D. R., 
No. 1 ; Temple Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of 
Westbrook; Presumpscot Valley Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias; S. D. Warner Council, 
No. 4, Society of American Mechanics; and 
Daughters of Liberty. He is a man of ability, 
with a fund of useful knowledge, and quiet 
and unassuming in his manner. 




PAGE HOWARD, a native of Cum- 
berland County, Maine, was born 
January 31, 1841, in the town of 
Harrison, beingason of Barzilla and 
Lucy Howard. The parents, who were farmers, 
had a family of right children, two sons and 
six daughters, five of whom are now living. 

B. Page Howard lived on the parental home- 
stead until 1S56, when he went to Vermont, 
where he was living when the late Civil War 
broke out. Responding to the first call for 
volunteers, Mr. Howard enlisted in Company 
K, Eighth Vermont Infantry, being mustered 



'74 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



into service at Brattleboro. He first faced the 
enemy at Brashear City, after which the regi- 
ment was ordered to Port Hudson, where it 
was under fire almost continually for forty-two 
days. They then went to Bayou Bluff, where 
they were encamped until the battle at Frank- 
lin, in which engagement they made an honor- 
able record for bravery on the field. The fol- 
lowing two months the regiment was stationed 
at New Orleans, where Mr. Howard was sent 
to the Marine Hospital, where he remained for 
six weeks, suffering from disease contracted 
through the hardships and exposure of army 
life. He received his discharge June 22, 
1864, his term of enlistment having expired. 

After a short stay in Vermont Mr. Howard 
came to Harrison, this county, where he and 
his father took a contract to build two dams. 
After their completion our subject located in 
the village of Bridgton, where he purchased a 
marble business, which he successfully con- 
ducted until 1885, when he sold out. He 
then turned his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits, in which he has since been engaged, 
being a thorough and practical farmer. In 
politics he affiliates with the Republican 
party, and he has served several terms as Road 
Surveyor. 

Mr. Howard was first married in 1S73 to 
Miss Emma Larrabee, who died, leaving one 
child, Emma. On March 2, 1884, Miss 
Susie E. Gamage became his wife, and of this 
union three children have been born: Eva M. ; 
Arthur T., who had a brief earthly life of 
but three years; and Arnold P. Mrs. Howard 
is a consistent and esteemed member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 




)YMAN F. WALKER, junior member 
of the firm of L. & L. F. Walker, 
coal and wood dealers of Yarmouth, 
Me., was born in the town of Cum- 
berland, Cumberland County, Me., on July 
28, 1836, son of Lyman and Louisa (Mer- 
chant) Walker. 

I lis grandfather, Jeremiah Walker, a native 
of Gouldsboro, Hancock County, Me., was 
a shoemaker by trade and also followed agri- 
culture to some extent. He married Miss 
Jane Maiston, who was born in North Yar- 



mouth, Me., a descendant of an old family. 
Six sons and four daughters were the fruit of 
their union, of whom two are now living — 
Mrs. Jane Sweetser, a resident of Brunswick, 
Me. ; and Lyman. Jeremiah Walker died on 
the old farm in North Yarmouth when eighty- 
six years old, his wife also surviving to a 
good age. 

Lyman Walker, father of the subject of this 
sketch, was born in North Yarmouth, Febru- 
ary 5, 1814, and received but meagre educa- 
tional advantages. His life has been spent 
for the most part in Yarmouth and vicinity. 
In 1 841 he began in the ship-building busi- 
ness, which he followed successfully up to 
1S74, turning out more vessel's than an)' other 
builder in Yarmouth, the largest being the 
"Sam Lock" of twelve hundred tons' burden. 
At times he had as many as one hundred men 
in his employ. In 1874 he gave up the busi- 
ness; and, with his son, who had previously 
been associated with him as partner for several 
years, the firm of L. & L. F. Walker was es- 
tablished. After a business connection of 
about fifteen years Mr. Lyman Walker sur- 
rendered the management to his son, and has 
since lived in retirement. His marriage with 
Miss Louisa Merchant was solemnized in 1834. 
She bore him four children, namely: Cordelia,' 
who died when six months old ; Charles M.', 
who died at the age of three months; Lyman 
F. ; and Elkanah H. The last named, who is 
station agent at Augusta, Me., has been with 
the Maine Central Railroad for over twenty 
years, and is one of the most trusty employees 
of that road. Mrs. Lyman Walker died in 
September, 1886. Both parents were com- 
municants of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and in political affiliation the father is a Dem- 
ocrat. 

Lyman F. Walker came to Yarmouth from 
Portland when four years old. He received 
his education in the public schools and at Yar- 
mouth Institute. On leaving the latter insti- 
tution, he went to work in his father's ship- 
yard, after which he was employed for a time 
as clerk, being subsequently taken into part- 
nership by his father. A few years later he 
gave up his interest in the business and went 
to Canada, where for a time he was engaged 
in lumbering. In 1S74 he entered into the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 75 



coal and wood business with his father at their 
present stand, as above narrated, the manage- 
ment being now in his own hands, owing to 
his father's retirement. Mr. Walker has the 
largest coal and wood business in Yarmouth, 
handling as much as thirty-three hundred tons 
of coal in a year. lie also deals in all kinds 
of building lumber. He has twice married, 
his first wife being Miss II. Lizzie Corliss. 
After her death he formed a second union 
with Miss Hannah Bliss, but has no children 
by either marriage. In politics Mr. Walker 
is a Prohibitionist. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Cumberland. 



(£JYANE LORD HERSOM, M.D., a phy- 
sician in active practice in Portland, 
was born in Maine, daughter of Samuel 
and Sophia Hight (Smith) Lord. The 
Lord family is of English origin, and Mrs. 
Hersom's branch of the family is connected 
with the Lords of Berwick and of Kittery. 
I Ier great-grandfather, whose name was Moses 
Lord, was one of the early settlers of the State. 
Her grandfather, also named Moses, was a 
pioneer of Sanford, Me., where he was en- 
gaged in farming. 

Samuel Lord, son of Moses Lord, Jr., was 
born at South Sanford proper, and in 1843 
moved to Springvale, a village in the same 
town. A great part of his earl)' life was de- 
voted to farming. After the war he moved to 
the old Chancellor place, three miles from 
the .battlefield of Chancellorsville in Virginia. 
In politics Mr. Lord was a Democrat, and 
he was strongly opposed to slavery. He was 
a prominent man in his district in Maine, 
serving as Deputy Sheriff of York County for 
some time and as Postmaster of Springvale from 
1852 to i860. He died in the South, in Feb- 
ruary, 1874. His wife, to whom he was 
united in 1836, was a native of Hollis, Me., 
and a daughter of Daniel Smith, of old York, 
and his wife, Sarah (Chase) Smith, of Saco. 
She reared two children: Dr. Jane Lord; and 
a son, Edwin Howard, who now has charge of 
the academy at Wolfboro. Mrs. Lord died in 
January, 1859, at the age of forty three years. 
She was a member of the Congregational 
church at Sanford Corner. 



Jane Lord Hersom attended public and pri- 
vate schools in Springvale, and taught at hei 
home in that town for some time before her 
marriage. In January, 1882, she took up the 
study of medicine. After spending one year 
under the tuition of Dr. S. II. Weeks, she 
studied for three years at the Woman's Medi- 
cal College of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, 
receiving her diploma in the fall of 1S86. Dr. 
Hersom immediately began to practice in 
Portland, and during the nine years of her 
professional life, in handling difficult cases, 
she has made a reputation for skill and deli 
cacy that has brought her a large clientage. 
She belongs to the Practitioners' Club of Port- 
land, of which she was President for a year, 
and is a member of the Cumberland County 
Medical Society, of the Maine State Medical 
Association, of the American National Medi- 
cal Association, and of the Maine Academy of 
Medicine and Science. 

Dr. Hersom was married in 1S65. Her 
husband, Nahum A. Hersom, who also was 
a physician, was a son of Nahum and Eliza- 
beth (Pray) Hersom, of Lebanon, Me., and 
was born in that town in 1S35. His father 
was a tailor, but was also engaged in farming. 
Nahum A. Hersom attended school at West 
Lebanon, and studied at the academy at Par- 
sonsfield, then quite a noted institution. He 
read medicine with Dr. John Parker, of Leba- 
non, and Dr. Nathan Parker, of Farmington, 
attended the Brunswick Medical School for a 
year, and graduated from the University of 
Pennsylvania at Philadelphia in 1S61. In the 
summer of that year he opened an office at 
Sanford Corner. In the fall of 1862, when 
the Twentieth " Maine Volunteer Infantry 
started for the South, he went with it as 
Assistant Surgeon. Six months later he was 
promoted to the rank of First Surgeon of the 
Seventeenth (Maine) Regiment, and during 
the last year of the war he had charge of the 
field hospital of the Third Division of the 
Second Corps. His health was good during 
the first part of his army life, but in the last 
year he had two attacks of malarial fever. 
He was on the point of having a third seizure 
when he was mustered out. He then located 
in Farmington, N.H., where he was married, 
and for two years attended to a heavy practice. 



2~\G 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



At the end of that time he prepared to take a 
vacation for two weeks, but it was five years 
before he was able to resume his professional 
work. In the fall of 1.N72 Dr. and Mrs. Iler- 
som removed In Portland, and there the Doctor 
built up an extensive practice in medicine and 
surgery. In the spring of 1881 he went to 
Europe for a rest of three months, but soon 
after landing he was taken ill. Within a week 
from that time he died of peritonitis in Dub- 
lin, among strangers, with not one of his kin- 
dred to bid him farewell. I le was a member 
of the County and State Medical Societies, of 
the American Medical Association, and of the 
Portland Clinical Society. He was prominent 
in each of these organizations anil took an 
active part in their important transactions. 
In politics he was a Republican. He kept up 
his army associations after the war, and was 
surgeon of a Grand Army Post. lie left one 
daughter, Mabel Lord Hersom, who is now a 
student at Smith College. 

Dr. Jane Lord Hersom takes an active 
interest in all projects for the good and the 
advancement of women. She served one year 
as President, and was also Treasurer, of the 
Maine Suffrage Association; and she was 
three years President of the Equal Suffrage 
Club of Portland. She belongs to the Monday 
Club, one of the oldest continuous history clubs 
oi the city, to the Women's Literary Union, 
and State and National Federation of Women's 
Clubs. In charitable and church work she is 
also active, belonging to the State Street Con- 
gregational Church, of which her husband also 
was a member. 




lHARLES M. CLARY, a prominent 
merchant of Harpswell, Me., with 
place of business on Bailey's Island, 
of which he is a native, was born 
on August 3, 1S45, son of Samuel and Susan 
W. (Gardener) Clary. His great-grandfather, 
Luther Clary, was one of the first settlers of 
Bailey's Island, owning sixty-five acres of 
land, part of which he cultivated. He lived 
to an advanced age. 

Ephraim Clary, son of Luther, was bom on 
Bailey's Island, and there made his home 
dining his life ol sixty-three years. He en- 



gaged in farming to some extent, and also, 
with a number of boats, took part in the fish- 
eries, which form the principal industrial 
feature of the island. 11 is wife was a Miss 
Gardener, a native of Orr's Island. They 
reared a large family, one son being Samuel, 
above named. 

Samuel Clary, the father of Charles M., was 
born in Portland, but spent the greater part ol 
his life on Bailey's Island. He went to sea 
as a fisherman when quite young, and was 
actively engaged in catching ami curing fish 
for some years, also raising garden produce on 
the home farm. He died in the prime of 
manhood, at the age of forty-five, having con- 
tracted ship fever during one of his expedi- 
tions to the high seas. He married Susan 
W. , a daughter of Ephraim Gardener, who was 
a fisherman of Bailey's Island. Mrs. Clary is 
yet living on the island, and is now seventy- 
two years of age. She worships at the Union 
Church, at whose services her husband also 
was a frequent attendant during his life. 
They reared but one child, the subject of this 
sketch. 

Charles M. Clary was but four years of age 
when his father died; and he was early called 
upon to take up the work of life, acquiring, as 
opportunity afforded, a good common-school 
education. He went on fishing expeditions 
when but ten years of age, and successfully 
followed that line of work until 1892, when he 
built his present place of business. This 
store is connected with the comfortable dwell- 
ing-house which he erected in 18S0, ami is 
well stocked with a full line of groceries, dry 
goods, notions, and other useful articles oi 
general merchandise. In addition to his retail 
trade Mr. Clary buys lobsters at wholesale 
to ship to distant cities, realizing a handsome 
income from this branch of his business. 
Thrown on his own resources when a child, he 
has developed remarkable business ability, and 
is now one of the prosperous merchants ol 
Harpswell. 

In 1868 Mr. Clary was united in marriage 
with Ella E. Huff, daughter of Joseph Huff, 
a fisherman of Boothbay, Me. Of the four 
children bom of this union one has passed 
to the world beyond. Mabel E. is with her 
parents; Ora A. is the wife of William L. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



277 



Greely, a fireman of the steamer "Merry- 
coneag" ; and Charles W. assists his father. 

A Democrat in polities, Mr. Clary has filled 
many public offices of trust, serving as As- 
sessor, Overseer of the Poor, and Selectman; 
and he has been a member of the town Demo- 
cratic Committee two years. lie was on the 
School Board two years under the town system, 
and also served under the district system. He 
belongs to but two social organizations, being 
a member of Pejapscot Lodge, No. 13, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, of Brunswick; 
also Sehascodegan Tribe, No. 30, I. O. R. M., 
of Orr's Island. With his wife he attends the 
Union Church on the island. A man of 
unusual intelligence, he is very prominent in 
Harpswell, anil takes an active interest in 
all matters concerning the public welfare. 




RVILLE G. BOYD, representative in 
Portland of the well-known firm of 
Stickney & Poor, spice manufacturers 
of Boston, was born in Portland, Me., 
December 4, 1S29, son of Enoch and Mary 
K. (Haskell) Boyd. His ancestors came 
originally from K.ilmarnock, Scotland. His 
great-grandfather, John Boyd, Sr. , who was a 
sea captain, was lost at sea. His grandfather, 
John Boyd, Jr., became a prosperous New 
Hampshire farmer. 

Enoch Boyd, father of Orville G., was bom 
in Salisbury, Mass., in 1796. At an early 
age he adopted mercantile pursuits, and was 
for several years an extensive wool merchant, 
but subsequently engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness, which he successfully conducted for a 
long period, being a well-known business man 
of his day. He finally retired; and the re- 
mainder of his life was passed in Melrose, 
Mass., where he died in 1877. His wile, 
Mary K. Haskell, who was born December 6, 
1802, was a grand-daughter of Nathaniel Has- 
kell, formerly a large land-owner in this State. 
She became the mother of four children, namely : 
< >i man Taylor, senior member of the firm of 
Boyd, Leeds & Co., of 2 16 State Street, Bos- 
ton ; Mary K., who resides in Melrose, Mass. ; 
Charles Oscar, who is in business in Melrose; 
and Orville G., the subject of this sketch. 
Mrs. Enoch Boyd died in 186S. 



Orville G. Boyd was educated in the schools 
of New Hampshire, completing his education 
at the academy in Laconia, that State. lie 
commenced business life as a clerk in a gen- 
eral store in Laconia, where he remained for 
a time. Coming then to Portland, he entered 
the clothing business in this city as a member 
of the firm of Boyd & Co. After a successful 
experience of several years he sold out and 
then went to Boston, where he engaged in the 
wholesale grocery business, becoming a part 
ner in the firm of L. G. Pratt & Co. This 
concern consisted of Messrs. Pratt and Leeds 
and the Messrs. Orman T. and Orville G. 
Boyd; but, Mr. Pratt finally withdrawing, the 
firm became known as Boyd, Leeds & Co. 
They carried on a flourishing business for some 
time, but at length dissolved; and Mr. Orville 
G. Boyd entered the firm of Stickney & Poor, 
with whom he has since remained, his connec- 
tion with that house having extended over a 
period of fifteen years. During this time- 
he has had charge of the Portland branch, 
which is located at 5 Exchange Street. He- 
occupies a prominent position among the busi- 
ness men of the city, and is widely respected 
for his personal character. He is a member 
of Unity Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and of Portland Encampment. In 
politics he is a Republican. Mr. Boyd mar- 
ried Susan W. Graffam, daughter of Captain 
Peter and Sarah M. (Cobb) Graffam, her 
father having been a well-known sea captain 
and ship-owner of Portland. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Boyd are members of the Free Street 
Baptist Church. 



f I^JrANVILLE M. RICH, senior mem- 
I \$T ber of the firm of G. M. & C. S. 
^ — Rich, of Standish, Cumberland 
County, Me., was born in this town, November 
12, 1S35. His paternal grandfather, Lemuel 
Rich, was a lifelong farmer in Standish, at- 
taining the age of fourscore years. To him 
and his wife, whose maiden name was Betsey 
Smith, seven children were born, John, the 
father of Granville M., being the second son. 
John Rich, a native of this town, was born 
in 1796, and spent his entire life in the place 
of his birth, being engaged in lumbering and 



2 7 3 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



farming. He married Susan l'hinney, daugh- 
ter of John l'hinney, of Gorham. They had 
three children, all of whom are living, 
namely: Myra; Serena, widow of Edwin 
Richardson, of Naples, Me.; and Granville 
M. Politically, the father was a Republican 
in his affiliations; and the mother, religiously, 
was a member of the Methodist church. 

Granville M. Rich was bred and educated in 
Standish; and after leaving school he here en- 
gaged in the lumber business with his father, 
being also interested in agricultural pursuits. 
He subsequently formed a partnership with 
C. S. Rich, and was extensively engaged in 
the manufacture of lumber for many years. 
The firm still own the plant in common, but 
its members carry on a separate business, 
operating the saw-mill individually, each 
being independent in his dealings. Mr. Rich 
is .111 earnest advocate of the principles of the 
Republican party, and takes an intelligent 
and active interest in local public affairs, in 
1883 and 1SS4 serving as a member of the 
Board of Selectmen. He is a Knight of 
Pythias, belonging to Crescent Lodge, No. 20, 
of Steep Falls, in this town. 

Mr. Rich was married June 8, 186S, to 
Abby F. Hamlin, daughter of Ebenezer C. 
Hamlin, of Standish. Mr. and Mrs. Rich 
have no children of their own living; but they 
have adopted a son and a daughter — Herbert 
L. and Annie P. Rich, who have all the ad- 
vantages of a refined and cultured home. Mr. 
Rich and his family attend the Baptist 
church. 




LEXANDER STEVENSON, formerly 
an expert wool-dyer and later a suc- 
cessful clothing merchant of West- 
brook, died at his home in this city 
in 1894. He was born in Scotland, February 
10, 1845, and was a son of Francis and Jean- 
ette (Miller) Stevenson. Wool-dyeing ap- 
pears to have been the hereditary occupation 
of the family, as it was the trade of his father 
and of his paternal grandfather, who lived ami 
died in Scotland. Francis Stevenson, who 
was born in Stirling, Scotland, emigrated 
with his family in 1856 to the United States, 
and settled in Clinton, Mass., where he was 



employed in the woollen factories, residing 
there for the rest of his life. He was an 
industrious and reliable workman; ami, be- 
coming a citizen of the United States, he 
supported the Republican party in politics, 
and in his religious belief was a Congrcgation- 
alist. His wife, Jeanette Miller, who was a 
native of Scotland, became the mother of nine 
children, five of whom are living, namely: 
Frank, a resident of Meriden, Conn. ; John, 
wlio is engaged in the clothing business in 
Wallingford, Conn.; Jeanette, wife of N. J. 
Harding, of Clinton, Mass. ; William, who 
resides in Clinton; and Maggie, wife of M. J. 
Dougan, of Worcester, Mass. 

Alexander Stevenson acquired his education 
in the public schools of Clinton; and, after 
completing his course of study, he went to 
Utica, N.Y., where he served an apprentice- 
ship of one and one-half years in the wool-dye- 
ing business under a Mr. Steele, a master dyer 
in the woollen-mills of that city. While in 
Utica he pursued a business course at the 
commercial college; and, after he had learned 
the dyer's trade, he went to Bridgton, Me., 
where he took charge of the dyeing department 
of the Pondicherry woollen-mills, which had 
just been erected, and he cleansed and dyed 
the first batch of wool ever used in those 
mills. He was connected with the Pondi- 
cherry mills for twenty-one years, during 
which time lie secured a high reputation 
throughout the State as an expert dyer: and his 
services commanded a handsome income. He 
owned real estate in Bridgton, together with 
other valuable property; and while residing 
there he was actively interested in both the 
social and political welfare of the town. In 
1886 he moved to Westbrook, where he entered 
the clothing business in company with his 
brother-in-law, Leander Clements, under the 
firm name of Clements & Co. ; and, purchas- 
ing his partner's interest four years later, he 
carried on the business successfully until his 
death, which took place as above stated. 
While conducting business in Westbrook, he 
was induced by Ayer & Houston, the hat man- 
ufacturers of Portland, who had much diffi- 
culty in obtaining a fast black color for their 
goods, to come to their assistance with his 
ripened knowledge and experience. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



279 



labored in their interest for six months with 
such success that at the end of that time the 
lii in offered him the entire charge of their fac- 
tory, but he declined to accept. 

Although naturally of a domestic turn of 
mind, preferring to pass his moments of leisure 
with his family, Mr. Stevens displayed a deep 
interest in the fraternal Orders. He was well 
advanced in Masonry, having been Master of 
Oriental Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Bridgton; 
had passed through the different chairs of the 
Royal Arch Chapter : and was a member of 
Lewiston Commandery, Knights Templars, 
lie was also a charter member of Highland 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of Bridgton. In 
politics he was a Democrat; and, while not 
taking any active part in public affairs, he 
sought by the aid of his vote to secure the 
proper administration. In his religious views 
he was a Universalist. 

On November 12, 1866, Mr. Stevenson was 
united in marriage to Abbie E. Alley, daugh- 
ter of E. T. Alley, of Bridgton. By this 
union there is but one son, Frank, who has 
succeeded his father in business. Frank 
Stevenson has already developed a thorough 
capacity for mercantile pursuits, and is at the 
present time the youngest merchant in West- 
brook. He is bright, energetic, and particu- 
larly agreeable in his manners, and is very 
popular, both socially and in a business way. 
Mrs. Stevenson, who survives her husband, is 
still residing in Westbrook. An intelligent, 
liberal-minded lady, she is highly esteemed 
by her many friends and acquaintances. 



jTjuWARD ALLING NOYES, Treasurer 
p| of the Portland Savings Bank, with 
— - which he has been connected since 

1S59, was born at Eastport, Me., October 6, 
1 8 39, son of Joseph Cobham and Helen M. 
(Ailing) Noyes. He is a lineal descendant 
of Nicholas Noyes, who located in Newbury, 
Mass., in 1635. 

Cutting Noyes, son of Nicholas, was the 
father of Joseph, who was born in 1689, and 
whose grandson and namesake, born in Port- 
land in 1745, took a leading part in public 
affairs, representing the district in the Pro- 
vincial Congress during the Revolutionary 



War. The second Joseph Noyes died in 1795. 
His grandson, Joseph Cobham Noyes, was bom 
in Portland, April 24, 1798, and moved to 
Eastport, Me., in .1819, engaging in business 
there as a ship-chandler and shipper of mer- 
chandise. An episode of Mr. Joseph C. 
Noyes's mercantile life about this time illus- 
trates his superiority to the petty graspings 
too common in trade. The canals were 
closed, and only about one-half the amount 
of flour necessary for consumers was obtain- 
able. A number of flour merchants, wishing 
to form a combine, waited on Mr. Noyes, who 
was so fortunate as to have received a large- 
amount of flour, and laid their proposed 
scheme before him. But he refused to comply 
with their request or to sell his goods to them 
at an advanced price or to their representatives 
who attempted to buy of him. Instead, Mr. 
Noyes advertised to sell to all bona fide heads 
of families in Washington County barrels of 
flour at only twenty-five cents' advance over the 
full cost, in this way crushing the combine. 
He believed in a fair profit on the necessaries 
of life and no more. 

In 1847 ne engaged in the flour trade in 
Portland, and for some years carried on an 
extensive and successful business. In 1859 
he was appointed Treasurer of the Portland 
Company (the locomotive works'), and about 
the same time became Treasurer of the Port- 
land Savings Bank. He then devoted all his 
time to the duties of these offices, but during 
the last years of his life his whole attention 
was given to the interests of the bank. This 
institution, when Mr. Noyes became first con- 
nected with it, had but one hundred and sixty 
thousand dollars on deposit, but its business 
was beginning to increase; and at the time 
of his death, July 28, 1868, the deposits 
amounted to two million, two hundred and 
seventy-three thousand dollars, the increase 
being partly clue to confidence in the probity 
and good management of the Treasurer. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Helen M. 
Ailing, was a native of Litchfield County, 
Connecticut, and grand-daughter of Major John 
Webb, a Revolutionary soldier of note. She 
died January 9, 1854. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. 
Noyes were the parents of four sons — George 
F., Frank, Edward A., and Joseph C. 



280 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Edward Ailing Noyes received a good edu- 
cation in the schools of Portland, and, when 
nineteen years of age, entered the counting- 
room of the Portland Savings Bank, where he 
was clerk live years. The following five years 
he was connected with the National Traders' 
Bank; and in 1-868, soon after the death of his 
father, he returned to the savings-bank, tak- 
ing the position of Assistant Treasurer, which 
he held till the death of his elder brother 
Frank, on December 17, 1877, when he suc- 
ceeded him as Treasurer. He is now in point 
of service the oldest official in the bank and 
one of the oldest bank Treasurers in the State. 
Dining his incumbency the deposits have in- 
creased from four million, two hundred and 
forty-eight thousand dollars to over eight 
million dollars, and are daily increasing. 
This bank is the largest east of Boston, and 
ranks ninth in New England in amount of de- 
posits. Edward Ailing Noyes has now held 
the office of Treasurer for nearly twenty years, 
and has established a reputation for unim- 
peachable judgment in financial matters. He 
is President of the Savings Bank Association 
of Maine. While devoting his time mainly to 
banking, he is also connected with other 
enterprises, including the Union Mutual Life 
Insurance Company of Maine, of which he is 
a Director, and the Portland Safe Deposit 
Company, of which he is Vice-President. In 
the public library he has taken especial in- 
terest. He was the first librarian, serving 
without pay for eleven years, and working 
earnestly to bring the institution to its present 
prosperous condition. He is now a member of 
the Committee on Books of the Board of Trus- 
tees, and has been Treasurer for many years. 

November 5, 1863, Mr. Noyes was united 
in marriage with Julia Augusta, daughter of 
John Edwards, of Portland, and grand-daugh- 
ter of Thomas Edwards, first Judge Advocate- 
general of the Revolutionary army, and at the 
time of his death Grand Secretary of the So- 
ciety of the Cincinnati. Seven children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Noyes, five of whom arc- 
living, namely: Helen Ailing; Charles Ed- 
wards, teller of the Portland Savings Bank; 
Julia; Joseph C. ; and Sidney W. 

In politics Mr. Noyes is a Republican, and 
he has taken an active part in furthering the 



interests of his party. He was Treasurer of 
the State Committee during the Blaine cam- 
paign, and was a member of the City Council 
from Ward 7 in 1882 and 1883, a member of 
the Board of Aldermen in 1884 and 1S85, ami 
Chairman of the Board in 1885. While a 
member of the city government, he was Chair- 
man of the Committee on Street Lighting, and 
was instrumental in introducing electric lights 
in the streets of Portland. 



EDUTHUN A. TRUMBULL, a vet- 
eran agriculturist, residing on his farm 
in Bridgton, was born in the town oi 
Denmark, Oxford County, Me., April 
3, 1817. He is the only living member of a 
family of eight children, six sons ami two 
daughters, born to Samuel and Lydia (Alexan- 
der) Trumbull, who spent their last years in 
this town. Their children bore the following 
names: Charles, Lois, Samuel, Jeduthun A., 
Lydia, William, John (first), and John 
(second). 

Jeduthun A. Trumbull received a limited 
education in the town of his birth, where he 
lived until reaching the age of twelve years. 
He then came with his parents to Bridgton, 
where for seven years he worked with his 
father on the farm and also at the stone 
cutter's trade. In 1836, two years before 
attaining his majority, he bought his time 
of his father, paying him one hundred dollars, 
and was afterward engaged in various pursuits 
until 1853, when he purchased the farm which 
he now owns and occupies. Here Mr. Trum- 
bull attended to his agricultural labors, and in 
addition worked at his trade, throughout his 
years of activity. He has eighty-five acres of 
productive land, in the care of which he has 
evinced excellent judgment and ability, by 
means of his industry and thrift acquiring a 
fair competency. He is a most respected citi- 
zen, and in politics he is a stanch supporter of 
the principles of the Democratic party. 

Mr. Trumbull has been twice married. His 
first wife, Rebecca N. Harnden, to whom he- 
was united in 1842, died October 16, 185 1, 
leaving two children, Sarah H. and ( )rren A. 
Sarah became the wife of Daniel Harmon, who 
served in the late Rebellion, having enlisted 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



28] 



in 1862 in Company 15, Twenty-third Maine 
Volunteer Infantry. The son, a bridge 
builder and contractor, lives in Reading, Mass. 
In 1S57 Mr. Trumbull was united in marriage 
to Miss Sophia M. Frye, who passed to the 
bourne from which no traveller returns, No- 
vember 28, 1888. The only child born of his 
second union was a son, Edward Frye, who 
lived but five years. 




|A J O R WILLIAM HENRY 
GREEN, one of the prominent 
contractors and builders of Port- 
land, and Department Com- 
mander of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
is a native-born citizen, the date of his birth 
being April 2, 1836. He is of substantial 
English stock, his paternal grandfather, John 
Green, Sr., having emigrated from England to 
Maine in the latter part of the last century. 
He built the first house, which is still stand- 
ing on Green Street, Portland, that thorough- 
fare being named in his honor. The large 
tract of land which he here bought appreci- 
ated afterward in value, being not far from the 
centre of the city. John Green, Sr., married 
a Miss Gould, daughter of an early settler; 
and their son, John Green, Jr., was the 
Major's father. 

John Green, Jr., was born in Portland in 
1795, and after reaching maturity started in 
business for himself as a rope-maker, carrying 
on a very successful business, supplying boats 
and producing cordage for other purposes for 
many years, continuing active until his death 
in 1S58. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Mary Jackson, was a native of Raymond, Me. 
They became the parents of the following chil- 
dren: John, the third of that name, who 
served in both the Mexican War and the late 
Civil War, and now resides at Fairfield in this 
State; Eliza, the wife of Seth Martin, of 
Chelsea, Mass.; William Henry; and Mary 
Frances, who married William E. Stevens, 
both being now deceased. The mother lived 
a widow many years, passing away in 1887, 
at an advanced age. 

William H. Green was educated in the 
Portland schools, being graduated from the 
high school in 1852. He soon began working 



at the trade of a brick mason, serving a three 
years' apprenticeship with S. C. & G. M. 
Chase, afterward working as a journeyman 
until war times. On June 10, 1862, Mr. 
Green enlisted as a private in Company B, 
Seventeenth Maine Volunteer Infantry, which, 
after the organization of the regiment, was sent 
to Camp King, on Cape Elizabeth, going 
thence to the front, August 22, 1862. The 
succeeding seven weeks the regiment occupied 
the line of forts on the north side of Washing- 
ton, after which it was assigned to Perry's 
Brigade, First Division, Third Corps of the 
Potomac Army, and was at the forefront at 
the battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 
1862. The regiment spent the following 
winter in camp near Potomac Creek, but was 
present at the battle of Chancellorsville, May 
3, and took part in the battle of Gettysburg, 
July 2 and 3, 1863, and in the engagement at 
Waupin Heights, afterward joining General 
Meade, when he fell back from Rapidan to 
the vicinity of Washington. The company 
advanced with the army to Kelly's Ford, and 
subsequently fought in the battles of Locust 
Grove and Mine Run, going into winter quar- 
ters near Brandy Station. In the spring the 
divisions were consolidated, forming the Sec- 
ond and Third Divisions of the Second Corps, 
and took an active part in the important con- 
tests of that year, being at the battles of the 
Wilderness, in all of the engagements in the 
vicinity of Spottsylvania, and at the capture 
of the bridges and works at North Anna, 
May 23, 1864. The army then moved via 
Milford to Cold Harbor, after the battle there 
crossing the James River and marching on to 
Petersburg, making assaults on the enemy's 
works at various times and places. In the 
spring of 1865 this regiment was under the 
command of General Grant in the skirmish at 
Deep Bottom, Boynton Plank Road, Hatches 
Run, and at Sailor's Creek, and on April 9, 
1865, was present at the surrender of Lee at 
Appomattox, an impressive scene, never to be 
forgotten. Mr. Green was made Sergeant of 
his company in December, 1862; Second 
Lieutenant in July, 1863; and, after the bat- 
tle of Gettysburg, for brave conduct was pro- 
moted to the rank of First Lieutenant. The 
following December Lieutenant Green was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



raised to the position of Captain of Company 
G, and at Sailor's Creek, three days before 
Lee's surrender, was brevetted Major, a well- 
merited promotion. 

After the Grand Review in Washington 
Major Green, having been in active mili- 
tary serviee three years, returned with his 
regiment to Portland, and resumed work at 
his trade, at first as a journeyman. In 1868 
he became a member of the firm of Knight, 
Green & Co., the firm continuing in business 
under this name until 1873, being engaged in 
contracting and building. In that year he 
formed a partnership with Mr. Jordan, under 
the name of Green & Jordan, and is still in 
business, theirs being the oldest contracting 
firm in the city. They have erected many of 
the prominent buildings of Portland, among 
others being the Storer Building, the Emery 
& Waterhouse store, the Shaler, Cavanaugh 
ami Carroll School-houses, the Public Library, 
and likewise many of the finest residences in 
the city, including Dr. Dana's and H. M. 
Rayson's. Major Green is a prominent mem- 
ber of the Mechanics' Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation, having been one of its promoters and 
a Director since its organization. 

Major Green has always been identified with 
the Republican ranks. He cast his first vote 
in 1864 at Petersburg, Va., for Abraham Lin- 
coln, the ballots being dropped in an ammuni- 
tion box. In local affairs he is very active 
and influential, and has served in various 
municipal offices with great acceptability. 
During the years 1872 and 1873 lie was a 
member of the City Council, and has been one 
of the Committee on Public Buildings, Street 
Commissioner, member of the Board of Over- 
seers for over twelve years, being Chairman 
of the Board for two years, and Chairman of 
the Farming Committee for six years. While 
seising in the State legislature in 1889, the 
Major was Chairman of the Committee on 
Military Affairs, a member of the Public 
Building Committee, and of the State Pension 
Committee, and instrumental in having the 
State Militia Bill and an appropriation for 
the Gettysburg monument carried through the 
House. 

In the years 1889 and 1S90 he was City 
Marshal under Mayor Melcher; and many im- 



provements in the police department were 
made during his term of office, the first patrol 
wagon ever used here being purchased, and 
the rogues' gallery established. A particular 
time for the annual spring ami autumn chang- 
ing of police uniforms from light to dark, and 
vice versa, was then instituted. The Major is 
a man of prominence in military circles, hav- 
ing joined the Bosworth Post, Grand Army of 
the Republic, in 1867, since when he has 
been Post Commander three different times; 
and, in February, 1895, at Skowhegan, was 
elected Department Commander for the State 
of Maine, having under his charge one hundred 
and sixty-six Posts, with an aggregate mem- 
bership of nine thousand. He is also identi- 
fied with other social organizations, belonging 
to Portland Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; to Munjoy 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias; to the Ancient 
Brothers Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; to the Eastern Star Encampment; to 
the Maine Commandery of the Loyal Legion, 
and the Lincoln Club. 

Major William H. Green married Miss Eda 
A. Merrill, daughter of Nathaniel Merrill, of 
Windham, Me., the only child of their union 
being Mildred G., wife of Herbert A. Roberts, 
of this city. Major Green is a regular attend- 
ant of the First Universalist Church and a 
generous contributor toward its support. He 
was one of the first to discover the beauties of 
that portion of the city known as the West 
End, and some twenty-five years ago built 
his present residence at No. 128 Funis 
Street. 




RACF CRFSSEY, a prominent and 
well-to-do agriculturist of Gorham, 
Cumberland County, Me., was bom 
in the town of Buxton, York 
County, March 10, 1841. He comes of sturdy 
English stock, his great-grandfather having 
emigrated from England in Colonial times, 
becoming a settler of Buxton. His two 
brothers, who accompanied him across the 
Atlantic, both located in the town of Gorham. 
All three took up land, and were in prosper- 
ous circumstances. 

Mr. Cressey's paternal grandfather, John 
Cressey, was a native of Buxton, and there 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



283 



spent his life. To him and his wife, Hannah 
Owens, seven children were born, two of 
whom are still living — Edmund Cressey, of 
Mollis, Me.; and Elijah Cressey, of Buxton. 

Daniel Cressey, one of the sons of John and 
Hannah Owens Cressey, was born and reared 
in Buxton, and there engaged in lumbering 
and general farming, fie was a keen, far- 
sighted man of business and very successful 
in his various undertakings, continuing in 
active pursuit until his death, which occurred 
in 1 8 g 1 . Politically, he was a Democrat, and, 
religiously, was an attendant of the Free Will 
Baptist church. He was twice married. His 
first wife, Mary Hill, a native of Brownfield, 
with whom he was united in 1840, died in 
1877, leaving six children, namely: Horace, 
the leading subject of this brief sketch; 
Hannah; Charles H.; Noah; Daniel; and 
Mary C, wife of Wilbur Rand, who has two 
children — Maud and Harold. Of his union 
with his second wife, Mary Flood, of Buxton, 
there were no children. 

Horace Cressey was educated in the schools 
of his native town and afterward worked on 
the home farm until 1863, when he offered his 
services to his country, enlisting in Company 
C, Twenty-seventh Maine Volunteer Infantry, 
which was made up of brave boys from York 
County. He subsequently re-enlisted, just 
prior to the battle of Gettysburg, for a week 
or ten clays, and for his gallantry received a 
medal of honor. On his return from war he 
worked for a time on the farm, going thence 
to Portland, where lie worked three years for 
the Portland & Rochester Railway Company. 
Mr. Cressey was then employed for three years 
in Warren's paper-mill at Cumberland Mills, 
after which he leased a farm in Buxton for 
two years. In 1878 he purchased the old 
Stone farm of one hundred acres, in Gorham, 
and here has since been actively and prosper- 
ously engaged in general agriculture, being a 
practical and progressive farmer. He is a 
stanch supporter of the principles of the Dem- 
ocratic part)-, and attends the Methodist 
church, of which his wife is a member. 

On November 21, 1S74, Mr. Cressey was 
married to Lovanthia Elwell, the seventh of a 
family of nine children born to George and 
Nancy (Smith) Elwell, of Gorham. Mr. and 



Mrs. Cressey have two children now living, 
namely: Ida M. Cressey, born May 29, 1876; 
and Alvin H. Cressey, born September 8, 
1877. 



^NATHANIEL DYER, a highly esteemed 
I — 7 native resident of Pownal, Me., for 
\\S I many years prominently identified 

""" with the management of town 
affairs, was born January 24, 1825, son of 
Michael and Rachel (Haskell) Dyer. Mr. 
Dyer's grandfather, Nathaniel Dyer, was an 
early settler of Cape Elizabeth, where he 
owned and cultivated a good farm. He was a 
ship master and owner, and for many years was 
a prominent man at Cape Elizabeth. He 
passed his last days in Portland, and died in 
that city at a good old age. He reared a fam- 
ily of three sons and three daughters, Michael, 
Mr. Dyer's father, being the youngest son. 

Michael Dyer was born at Cape Elizabeth, 
November 1, 1782. In early manhood he set- 
tled in Pownal as a pioneer, erecting a log 
house, and clearing a good farm from the 
wilderness, and by his energy and persever- 
ance succeeded in establishing a comfortable 
home for himself and family. He owned a 
farm of one hundred acres, which he culti- 
vated with prosperous results. He died at the 
age of seventy-eight years and ten months. 
In politics he was a Democrat, and he was 
called to serve in public affairs as a Select- 
man of the town and a Representative to the 
legislature. He was twice married. 1 1 is 
second wife, who was born in Gorham, Me., 
January 1, 1786, lived to reach the unusually 
advanced age of nearly one hundred years. 
He reared a family of thirteen children, three 
of whom are living, namely: Nathaniel, the 
subject of this sketch, who is the eldest; Mrs. 
Rachel Bangs, who was born March 23, [826, 
and now resides in Pownal; and Sarah Whit- 
more, who was born October 8, 1827, and re- 
sides in Oakland, Cal. 

Nathaniel Dyer received his education in 
the schools of Pownal, and in young manhood 
he was employed as a ship carpenter for a short 
time. His principal occupation in life, how- 
ever, has been farming. In 184S he purchased 
the home farm of one hundred and fifty acres, 



284 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



desirably located, which he has since con- 
ducted. As a general fanner he lias by his 
energy and good management kept his farm up 
to a high standard of excellence, and has at- 
tained a comfortable prosperity. The present 
substantial buildings on his place were erected 
by him. In politics he supports the Repub- 
lican party, and he has rendered faithful and 
valuable services to the town as Selectman, 
Assessor, Treasurer, and in other offices; and 
in 1861 and 1862 he served with marked abil- 
ity as a Representative to the State legis- 
lature. 

On March 18, 1851, Mr. Dyer was united 
in marriage with Harriet L. Martin, who was 
born in Poland, Me., April 9, 1827, daughter 
of Robert Martin. Mrs. Dyer died September 
12, 1877, leaving two children — Edwin L. 
and Hattie E. Edwin L. Dyer, born October 
15, 1S55, is a lawyer and present City Clerk 
of Portland. He was married August 2, 1888, 
to Fanny Green, and has two children, named 
Dorothy and De Young. Hattie E. Dyer was 
born October 6, 1857. On September 22, 
1886, she married Fred B. Pistes, a travelling 
salesman. Mr. and Mrs. Estes reside in 
Deering. They have one daughter, named 
Mabel H. 

Mr. Dyer is widely and favorably known as 
a genial, sociable gentleman and a kind- 
hearted friend. His views arc liberal upon 
religious subjects. Socially, he is connected 
with Ereeport Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and the 
Knights of Pythias. 




)EWELLYN SPURR, a prominent citi- 
zen of Otisfield, Cumberland County, 
Me., who is now actively engaged 
in general farming and dairying, was 
born in Otisfield, October 15, 1844. He is 
the son of Samuel and Laura (Harding) 
Spurr, the former a native of Otisfield, Me., 
the latter of Blue Hill, and the grandson of 
William and Nabbie N. (Dole) Spurr, early 
settlers in Otisfield. 

William Spurr, who was born March 8, 1765, 
was an able farmer and also worked at shoe- 
making. He spent the greater part of his life 
in Otisfield, dying July 10, 1837. His wife, 
Nabbie N. Dole, was born in Windham, Me., 



October 3, 1770, and died in Otisfield, Octobei 

12, 1844. She was the mother of twelve chil- 
dren — Miriam, born August [I, 1790, who 
died December 25, 1851; Joseph, who was 
born August iS, 1792, and died August 20, 
1802; Oliver, born June 23, 1794, who died 
May 14, 1868; Polly D., who was born April 

13, 1797, and died May 7, [828; Fannie, who 
was born July 27, 1799, and died July 23, 
1 81 5; Merrill, who was born April 18, 1801, 
and died February 21, 1S76; Jemima, born 
September 26, 1803, who died February 3, 
1848; Amelia, who was born March 25, 1806, 
and died April 21, 1806; Robert, born April 
20, 1807, who died June 4, 1878; Meredith 
W. , born June 23, 1809, who died February 
16, 1881; Samuel, born March 1, 1812; and 
William, Jr., born May 31, 18 14, who died 
April 28, 1825. 

Samuel Spurr was the eleventh child of this 
large family. Reared to farm life, he early 
settled on the farm which is now managed by 
his son, and by industry and judicious manage- 
ment drew from the soil a comfortable living. 
He occupied a prominent place among the 
citizens of the town, and held many offices oi 
trust. He died March 3, 1855, his wife sur- 
viving till 1895. Six children brightened 
their home — Clara S. , born in 1840, now the 
wife of Hamlin Spiller, of Lowell, Mass. ; 
Joseph M., born May 21, 1841, a shirt manu- 
facturer of Lowell, Mass., married, his wife 
being formerly Miss Laura Adams; Byron, who 
died in infancy; Cyril P., born in February, 
1846, a shoemaker living in South Bridgton, 
Me., and married to Mary Corson, of Bridgton ; 
Lewellyn, born October 15, 1844, the special 
subject of this sketch; and Ida M., born in 
January, 1852, wife of Albert Strout, of 
Webb's Mills, Me. 

Lewellyn Spurr received his early education 
in the public schools of Otisfield. He was 
but ten years of age when his father died, and 
was obliged to be content with a common- 
school education, going to work on a farm in 
North Yarmouth, Me., when he was seventeen 
years of age. He worked in North Yarmouth 
three months, and, when the war broke out, 
though under age, signified his willingness to 
fight for his country, enlisting August 2, 1S62, 
in Company H, Seventeenth Maine Infantry, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



285 



under command of Captain A. L. Fogg and 
Colonel T. A. Roberts. He took part in 
si ime of the most momentous engagements of 
the Civil War, including Fredericksburg, 
Gettysburg, and Chancellorsville. At Gettys- 
burg, July 2, 1863, he received a bullet 
wound in the leg, which permanently disabled 
him, and on account of which he was sent to 
the hospital at Newark, N.J. Receiving his 
discharge from the service September 25, 
1863, he returned home; and, his lameness in- 
capacitating him for farm work, he learned the 
shoemaker's trade and worked at it for two 
years in Mechanic Falls, Lewiston, and Otis- 
field. By that time his strength had returned; 
and, being again able to engage in active out- 
door labor, he resumed his farm work during 
the summer season, being employed in logging 
in winter in New Hampshire and Vermont, 
and in the summer of 1867 working in the 
brickyard in Oxford, Me. November 1, 1870, 
he moved to his present home to take care of 
his uncle and aunt; and when they died he 
succeeded to the ownership of the farm. The 
estate comprises about one hundred acres, and 
under Mr. Spurr's management is in a highly 
productive condition. He raises large quan- 
tities of hay, grain, and potatoes, and makes 
a fine grade of butter, which he sends to 
markets in different parts of the country. He 
also finds lucrative employment as a carpenter 
and mason. 

( )n February 14, 1882, Mr. Spurr was mar- 
ried to Miss Lydia Scribner, who was born in 
Otisfield, August 20, 1852, daughter of John 
and Sarah (Lamb) Scribner, both of Cumber- 
land County. Mrs. Spurr comes of a long- 
lived family, her great-grandfather, Edward 
Scribner, attaining the remarkable age of one 
hundred and three, and her grandfather, John 
Scribner, living to be ninety-five years of age. 
Her father was a prominent farmer and lum- 
berman of Otisfield. Mr. and Mrs. Spurr 
have one child — William S., born February 
28, 18S3. 

Politically, Mr. Spurr has been an ardent 
supporter of Democratic principles since he be- 
came of age. He was Selectman of Otisfield 
in 1884, 1892, 1893, and 1894. He is some- 
what of an antiquary and has a unique collec- 
tion of old documents and other relics, includ- 



ing almanacs dating back to 1757, which were 
gathered by different members of the Spurr 
family and given to him by his aunt, Sallie 
Spurr, who lived to be ninety years "I age, 
and a singing book, dated February 5, 1755. 
Mr. Spurr is adding yearly to his interesting 
collection, which is thus constantly increasing 
in value. 



AMES L. RICE, a substantial citizen 
and highly successful retail grocer of 
Portland, where he has a store at the 
corner of Congress and Portland Streets, 
was born in bis city, October 9, 1861, a son 
of Richard Gooding and Mary E. (Libby) 
Rice. 

When he was but six months old, his parents 
left Portland and moved to North Pownal, 
where they settled on a farm, subsequently 
removing to a farm in Westbrook, and going 
after a year's stay in that place to Scarboro, 
and thence to South Gorham. In the two 
places last named they remained several vears, 
the father being engaged in agriculture. 

James L. Rice attended school in various 
places; and, as his parents returned to Portland 
on leaving South Gorham, he finished his 
early education in the common school of Deer- 
ing. In 1876, when he was fifteen years of 
age, he took a course at Gray's Business Col- 
lege, and subsequently found employment with 
I. S. Bean in a wholesale fruit and produce 
store, where he remained a year, acquiring his 
first practical knowledge of business. After 
that he secured a position as book-keeper for 
Thompson & Hall, general commission prod- 
uce merchants, and two years later, in 1S84, 
started a small grocery store on his own ac- 
count. At first he employed but one clerk; 
but at the end of two years his trade had in- 
creased to such an extent as to warrant his 
entering more commodious quarters, and be- 
came to his present stand, a fine large corner 
store, where he now has the best business in 
this portion of the city, giving employment to 
seven people besides himself. 

On February \(~\ 18S4, Mr. Rice was united 
in marriage with Miss Ida L. Phillips, a 
daughter of Ossian C. Phillips, of Turner, 
Me. ; and they are the parents of two children 



->S6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



— Albert L. and Ada May. Mr. Rico is a 
faithful supporter of. the Republican party 
at the polls, but has never sought office. He 
and his family reside in Deering and are at- 
tendants of the Congregational church, to the 
support of which he contributes. 



Ji 



WIK1. M. CROCKETT, Town 
Clerk at Bridgton, Me., was born 
January 25, 1S31, in Charleston, 
S. C. His parents, Daniel Merrill 
and Ellen (Thomas) Crockett, had but two 
children, the elder being a daughter. The 
mother died when Daniel was an infant; and 
the father, who was engineer in a rice factory 
in Georgetown, N.C., died eight years later. 
After the death of his mother Daniel M. 
Crockett was taken to Portland to live with an 
uncle, who had sent for him, and made his 
home in that city until fourteen years old. 
Engaging subsequently for some time as a 
farm laborer, he became thoroughly acquainted 
with agricultural work; but, preferring to learn 
a trade, he then went to Westbrook, where 
he served an apprenticeship at shoemaking, 
which he subsequently followed for six years, 
and after that he was employed in lumbering 
in Wisconsin for two years. Returning to 
Westbrook, and again working at shoemaking 
for a short time, Mr. Crockett next established 
himself in business, which he finally sold out 
in the time of the late Rebellion, in order that 
he might offer his services in his country's 
defence. Accordingly, on October 3, 1861, 
he enlisted as a private in Company C, 
Twelfth Maine Volunteer Infantry, being 
mustered in at Portland. Sent to the South 
with his regiment, Mr. Crockett first met the 
enemy in battle at Ponchatoula, where he was 
wounded in the face by a piece of shell and 
was taken prisoner. He was held in the prisons 
of Jackson and Vicksburg from September 1 
until the following January, when he was ex- 
changed. Rejoining his regiment, he was 
soon sent to New Orleans, where he was sta- 
tioned three weeks, and the following fourteen 
weeks he spent at the St. James Hospital. 
His term of enlistment having now expired, he 
was honorably discharged, being mustered out 
of service September 7, 1S64. 



( >n his return to Westbrook Mr. Crockett 
resumed work at his trade, but was afterward 
appointed Assistant Postmaster, and was also 
clerk in a store, continuing thus engaged until 
1865, when he came to Bridgton, where he has 
since made his home. For- some years he has 
been engaged in farming. He was re-elected 
March 2, 1896, for the fifth term as Town 
Clerk of Bridgton, having tilled this office 
with credit for four years, and, himself a loyal 
Republican, enjoying the respect of both po- 
litical parties. He is prominent in the Grand 
Army of the Republic circles, having been 
Adjutant of Farragut Post, No. 21, for a quar- 
ter of a century. 

Mr. Daniel M. Crockett and Miss Abbie 
Mead were united in wedlock on November 26, 
1865. They have but one child living, a 
daughter, Susanna M., having been bereft of 
their only son, Charles M. 




EV. ASA DALTON, D.D., Rector 
of St. Stephen's, Portland, Me., was 
Js \ born in Westbrook, Me., Octobei 

^""^ 30, 1824. He comes from good old 
New England stock, being a descendant ol 
Philemon Dalton, who emigrated to this coun- 
try in 1635, bringing with him his wife and 
son, and was one of the founders of Dedham, 
Mass. After a time he moved to New Hamp- 
shire, and settled in Hampton, of which 
place he was also one of the first settlers and 
incorporators. 

Philemon Dalton soon became a leading 
man in his new home. He was elected to 
many offices of trust, and gained the respect 
and confidence of the people among whom In- 
dwelt. He became Deacon of the church 
and Selectman, and, as civil magistrate, had 
authority to perform marriage ceremonies. He 
died June 4, 1662, from injuries received from 
the fall of a tree. The Rev. Timothy Dalton, 
brother of Philemon, also sought a home in the 
New World. The rectorship of Woolverstone, 
Suffolk, England, which lie had held for more 
than twenty years, was taken from him under 
the tyrannical rule of Archbishop Laud. lie. 
therefore, in 1637 left England, and joined his 
brother Philemon at Hampton, and was the 
first "teacher" of the church there. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



287 



Samuel, son of Philemon Dalton, was born 
in England, 1629, but was brought up in this 
country from his early childhood. His career 
proves him to have been a man of sense and 
integrity. He was called upon while quite a 
young man to fill offices of trust; and he served 
as Clerk of the town of Hampton for thirty 
years, nearly all the deeds, wills, and civic 
records being in his handwriting. lie repre- 
sented Hampton in the General Court in 1662, 
1664, 1666, 1669, 1671, 1673, and 1679. 
He was in 1665 elected Associate Judge of 
the courts of Norfolk and Treasurer of the 
county, which offices he held until 1680, when 
New Hampshire formed a separate govern- 
ment. As soon as the new order was estab- 
lished, so high was the esteem in which Mr. 
Samuel Dalton was held that he was elected 
a member of the first council held by the State 
under President Cutt, an office he held until 
his death. On February 6, 1650, he married 
Mehitable, daughter of Henry Palmer, of 
Haverhill. She survived her husband, and 
married the Rev. Zachariah Symmes, of Brad- 
ford. 

Philemon Dalton, son of Samuel, was born 
in Hampton, N.H., December 16, 1664. He 
lived on the homestead, and did not go into 
public life, but served in the church, holding 
the office of Deacon. He was married on 
September 25, 1 690, to Abigail Gove, daugh- 
ter of Edward and Hannah (Titcomb) Gove. 
Their son Samuel was born July 22, 1694. 
He was a teacher, and married Mary, daugh- 
ter of Moses T. and Mary (Carr) Leavitt, who 
was a descendant of Thomas, of Exeter, N.H. 
Michael Dalton, brother of Samuel, became a 
prominent merchant in Newburyport, Mass., 
and was the father of Tristram Dalton, who 
was the first United States Senator from that 
State. 

Samuel, the son of Samuel and Mary 
(Leavitt) Dalton, was born in Hampton, 
N.H., April 5, 1726. In 1757 he married 
Sarah Scott; and they were early settlers of 
Parsonsfield, Me. Their son, Samuel Dalton, 
was born in Hampton, N.H., August 7, 1 77 1 . 
He became a merchant, and married in 1795 
Mary, daughter of Joel and Lydia (Perkins) 
Bennett, of York, Me., a descendant of John 
Bennett, of Wells, Me. 



Samuel Dalton, oi Westbrook, Me., born in 
Parsonsfield, November 25, 179", son of Sam- 
uel and Mary (Bennett) Dalton, was a mer- 
chant, as was his father before him. He mar- 
ried on October 12, 1S19, Mary Ann, daughtei 
of Joseph Huckins, of Effingham, N.H., and 
his wife, Mary Jenness, of Portsmouth, N.H. 
Mrs. Dalton was a descendant of Robert 
Huckins, whose son James was killed by the 
Indians, when his house in the garrison was 
taken, and all its inmates slain, with the ex 
ception of one son, Robert, who escaped the 
following day. 

The Rev. Asa Dalton is the eighth in de- 
scent from Philemon Dalton, his first Ameri- 
can ancestor. Dr. Dalton's parents removed 
from Maine to Massachusetts during his boy- 
hood; and in the Cambridge High School he 
was fitted for Harvard University, where he 
was graduated with distinction in 1S4S, a 
member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, from 
the first eight of his class. After receiving 
his college degree, he decided to enter the 
ministry, and continued his studies at Cam- 
bridge, at the Divinity School of the Univer- 
sity. Not long after, Mr. Dalton went to 
Newport, R.I., where he established a classi- 
cal school, which had a prosperous career. 
Later he accepted the position of Assistant 
Rector of the Church of the Ascension in New 
York. During two years of this ministry he 
also edited the Protestant Churchman of that 
city. From 1856 to 1862 Mr. Dalton was 
Rector of St. John's Parish, Bangor; and one 
year later, in 1863, he came to Portland, 
where he assumed his present charge, the rec- 
torship of St. Stephen's. He married, in 
1851, Maria Jackson, a native of Roxbury, 
Mass., the daughter of the Rev. William 
and Mary Brown Leverelt. 

The spiritual elevation of those about him 
as well as the material advancement of the 
church, bear witness to Dr. Dalton's faithful 
and efficient ministry. His broad outlook ami 
wide sympathies have conjoined to establish 
the happiest relations between the parish and 
the various congregations of other denomina- 
tions in the city. During his ministry at Si. 
Stephen's, Dr. Dalton has delivered fifteen 
courses of free lectures upon historical and 
literary subjects, and these lectures have been 



?88 



RIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



u : Iv attended by the most intelligent people 
ol the city. Their popularity has not been 
confined to Portland, as they have been widely 
reported and read; and it is only the just 
measure of praise to say that these literary 
talks were the most popular lectures ever 
given in this city. Dr. Dalton's energy as a 
writer is remarkable. Besides frequent con- 
tributions to periodicals and reviews, he has 
written and published a volume of sermons 
and a church history, which have received ap- 
preciative commendations from both the secu- 
lar and religious press. He has always co- 
operated with other churches in their religious 
and charitable work, and is connected with 
several literary and benevolent societies. His 
name is enrolled among the members of the 
New England Historical and Genealogical 
Society and the Maine Historical Society, 
and he is Vice-President of the Harvard Club 
of Maine. No surer testimony of a man's 
life work can be given than the happier, wiser, 
better condition of those among whom and for 
whom he has labored. 

A Maine man. Dr. Dalton early decided to 
devote his life to the highest interests of his 
native State, a plan to which he has adhered 
unswervingly, subordinating all sectarian re- 
lations and schemes to this purpose — namely, 
that of promoting the intellectual and moral 
advancement of his city and State. 



(CY"IIN G. TOLFORD, late an esteemed 
resident of Gorham, Me., in former 
years one of the leading dry goods mer- 
chants of Cumberland County, doing 
.business in Portland, was born in Saco, Me., 
in 1S11, son of Joshua and Mary Tolford. 
His parents removed to Portland when lie was 
eleven years old; and in that city he earned 
his first wages, being employed in a grocery 
store. He left his [dace within a short time, 
however, because liquor was sold there, and 
next entered the dry-goods store of Rogers & 
Cutler, where he began work as an errand boy. 
The strength ol principle which caused him to 
resign his first position never deserting him, 
step by step he worked his way up until 
finally he became owner and manager of the 
business, which he moved to more commodious 



quarters across the street. .As the years passed, 
fortune favored him increasingly; and in 1852 
he built another store on Free Street, Portland. 

In 1865 he retired from business, having 
accumulated a fortune, and travelled for some 
time on the Continent; and in 1875 he bought 
the handsome estate in Gorham where his 
widow now resides, furnishing his home with 
all needed comforts and luxuries suggested by 
good taste and foreign travel. A Republican 
in politics, he took a personal interest in 
national affairs, but was not an -aspirant for 
office. He was a prominent member of St. 
Stephen's Episcopal Church in Portland, 
which he joined when a young man, and was 
Senior Warden for over twenty-five years. He 
died November 1, 1880, in his seventieth year. 

Mr. Tolford was married in 1854 to Miss 
Anna B. Mountfort, daughter of Captain 
Daniel and Mary (Mussey) Mountfort, of Port- 
land. The Mountfort family is of English 
origin. Mrs. Tolford's grandfather, Daniel 
Mountfort, was a tanner of Portland, and in 
that city her father was born. He began to 
follow the sea when only a lad, and was Cap- 
tain of a vessel when he was twenty-one years 
of age. After weathering successfully the 
tempests of many seasons, he was finally lost 
at sea, December 22, 1839, his vessel being 
wrecked in a snowstorm off Cape Cod. He 
left three children, Mrs. Tolford, who was 
born in Portland in 1828, being the youngest 
and the only one now living. She enjoyed 
the best educational advantages offered at the 
time, attending the common schools of Port- 
land, and finishing her studies at Packard's 
Seminary on Free Street, Portland. Of her 
union with Mr. Tolford two children were 
born, a son and a daughter. John G, the son, 
a promising lad, attended the Gorham High 
School and then entered Phillips Academy at 
,\ in lover, Mass. lie was called home at the 
time of his father's death, and shortly after 
that sad event was taken ill. Three years 
later (1883) he died. He was then nineteen 
years of age. The daughter, Mary Elizabeth, 
received a liberal education, attending Mrs. 
Bailey's Home School at New Gloucester, 
Me., after a preliminary course of study in the 
Portland schools, later taking a special course 
at the Belcher School, Farmington, Me., and 




JOHN G. TOLFORD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



291 



at Gorham Seminary, and finally entering 
Wellesley College, whore she took a four 
years' course, graduating from the musical 
department in 1883. Nine years later she 
married Mr. John A. Ilinkley, of Gorham. 

Mrs. Tolford is highly esteemed in Gorham 
and in Portland, her earl)' home. She attends 
the Congregationalist church, and is always 
ready to respond to the demands of charity. 
Mr. Tolford was a fine example of a self-made 
man; and the wealth which blessed his declin- 
ing years was but a fitting outcome of the 
struggle of his youth with poverty and temp- 
tation, his constant integrity, and his diligent 
application to business in his manhood's prime. 

This brief memoir is happily accompanied 
by a lifelike portrait of Mr. Tolford. 




ATTAIN WILLIAM E. DFNNI- 
SON, who died on September 3, 1895, 
was for a number of years Com- 
mander of the Maine Central 
steamer, "Frank Jones." He was born in 
Portland, June 29, 1832. His father was 
Captain C. VV. Dennison, of Freeport, Me., 
where his grandfather, Solomon Dennison, 
lived; but the family originally came from 
Gloucester, Mass. At the age of thirteen 
William F. went to sea, going before the mast, 
working his way from the lowest to the high- 
est round in thirty-nine different vessels. 
His life was one of varied experiences. He 
was at one time an indigo planter in Central 
America, and he was master of an armed trad- 
ing schooner on Lake Nicaragua until driven 
thence by one of the periodical Central 
American revolutions. During the Crimean 
War he was one of the crew of a transport 
which carried British troops through the Black 
Sea to Sebastopol ; and, in the war of the Re- 
bellion, with his gunboat he assisted in the 
capture of the blockade - running steamers, 
"Circassian" and "Emma Henley," carrying 
away the largest prizes ever taken by the 
American navy. He was for seven years 
engaged in the coal business, and he made and 
lost a fortune in the California gold mines. 
Tact is better than talent, and Captain Den- 
nison's ability to take advantage of the situa- 
tion is notable. It was a lucky stroke for him 



when he was transferred from the Captaincy 
of a merchantman to the command of one ol 
Uncle Sam's war vessels. With the Ameri- 
can schooner "Adrianna," Captain Dennison 
saved the United States steamship "Wyo- 
ming," which had been run ashore by her 
rebel-sympathizing crew in the Gulf of Cali- 
fornia, July 31, 1861. The "Wyoming 
taught the Japanese to respect the valor of 
American seamen by fighting singly the com 
bined Japanese fort and fleet, and achieving 
a most audacious victory in the Strait of Si 
monoseki, whence warships of three nations 
had been driven. The "Wyoming" was one 
of the Linked States squadron then in the 
Pacific Ocean. Lieutenant Murray required 
Captain Dennison to leave the "Adrianna" 
for the time and go on board the "Wyoming," 
which was in so critical a position that Cap- 
tain Dennison realized that they must work 
night and day to save her. He called for the 
pilot who was in command when the "Wyo- 
ming" grounded, for the moral circumstances 
of the movement assured him that the vessel 
had been purposely run ashore. The disci- 
pline of the "Wyoming" was exceedingly lax. 
Her late Captain and other officers, honored 
with commissions by the United States gov- 
ernment, had deserted the vessel and had gone 
to join the rebels ; and of those who remained 
behind many were tainted with sentiments 
hostile to the government. While Dennison 
and Murray were talking over affairs, the pilot, 
who without any authority had been set 
ashore, made off and was seen no more. The 
"Wyoming" went ashore at high water, under 
full steam, with the power of her engine fully 
developed. Her keel lay parallel to the coast, 
far from the nearest habitation. After run- 
ning her ashore, the crew had taken the steam 
anchor out over the starboard bow and planted 
it farther upon the reef. The cable of this 
anchor had been tightened by the Captain, and 
the ship had thus gone farther ashore and 
more into danger. The "Wyoming " hail been 
thoroughly overhauled and repaired at the 
Mare Island navy-yard, and had on board all 
her stores and equipments. 

The tides in the Gulf of California are 
scarcely perceptible, and a ship ashore any- 
where in it increased her danger by delay. 



■'I 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



As soon as Captain Dennison took charge, the 
"Adrianna " hauled alongside and commenced 
to take aboard the shot and shell ; and, having 
lightened her burden, the ship thus took out 
astern the bow anchors of the disabled vessel, 
and at 6 p. \i., August 2, got the gunboat afloat 
and towed it into Petaluma Hay, a snug harbor, 
where the transfer of stores was made. ( )n 
the evening of August 4 both vessels went to 
sea, the "Adrianna" in tow of the "Wyo- 
ming." On August 7, at 9 a.m., the "Wy- 
oming " discharged the "Adrianna." Thus for 
seven days did the "Adrianna," interrupting 
her voyage, stand by the unfortunate ship, sav- 
ing her from imminent peril. 

Captain Dennison was at one time in com- 
mand of the "Cherokee," and served the 
blockade at Fort Fisher. On his return from 
the war he commanded the steamer "City of 
Richmond " until the "Frank Jones " went on 
the line. His steamboat route was from Port- 
land to Machias